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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Led Zeppelin - In The Light
Out of the three Zeppelin biographies that I have read, this is by far the best. Diligently researched, and well written it keeps you wanting to return to the albums (always a sign of a good music book) with each record being examined in great detail, which led to me purchasing Moby Grape's "Grape Jam" (1967) Grape Jam] album after discovering that the roots to Zep's...
Published on 19 Mar 2010 by Simon F.

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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wall to Wall Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin's latest author Mick Wall he has previously written books on Black Sabbath and Marillion as well as hastily assembled book on John Peel. I've no interest in Sabbath but have read his Marillion and Peel books and of course know his writing well from many high street rock magazines.

First of, despite some misgivings over Mr. Wall's writing style, I...
Published on 28 May 2009 by M. S. Smith


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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars These guys are Zep???, 26 Mar 2009
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Mark C. Hall (Krakow , Poland) - See all my reviews
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Im not sure Ill be able to finish this book... After reading the review in the Guardian I was really looking foreward to it... As it is, these guys are putting me to sleep... It's not that the book is badly written: It's just that members of Zep come off as either drunken brutes , bores or , in the case of Page a hobbit addled Satanist...yawn.... hard to believe these are the guys who came up with all that great music....The potentially clever use of the first person device to get into the heads of the members fails miserably because after a while you never know who the hell is talking.. It seems like the same dummy each time...
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but..., 25 April 2014
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SPUD (Cardiff Wales) - See all my reviews
This review is from: When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin (Paperback)
I would like to kick off by saying this is a very good book. It covers an array of things from the occult to the bands dysfunctional behaviour. But there are many, many flaws and inaccuracies. First off is Wall's attitude to other bands. Take the Beatles for instance. Wall suggests that the flaw with The Beatles was; they weren't touring because Epstein left them in the lurch. There are two mistake here. The band themselves have said they didn't want to tour anymore. What's more, Brian Epstein didn't leave the band to fend for itself, he died.
Secondly, Mick Walls endless criticisms of the Rolling Stones is another factor. Always saying LZ was the more dominant band. Although support for LZ it is to be expected, Wall doesn't bother mentioning that both bands were never in the same league and weren't producing music anywhere close to each other. While all the time mentioning Jimmy Page's relationship with Keith Richards and the amount of occasions where Jimmy NEARLY joined the Stones. Completely overlooking Richards comments opinions on Zeppelin, how different they both were and so on.
Third is the rather upsetting factor of overlooking John Paul Jones. The book is more about Jimmy Page followed by a Chapter or two on Plant and Bonham. It creates the idea that Wall never made the effort to research about JPJ.
Another criticism, of many more, is the ending of the book. Wall finishes the last 20 or so pages with and attack (almost) on Plant for refusing to reunite Zeppelin and taking priority over his solo career fair enough but It does go to far in places.
My final comment, (and this really annoyed me) was the comment on how Plant's career is far more influential and successful then Paul McCartney's. The Beatles more or less stopped in 1970. Over the last 40 years Paul McCartney has achieved much more than Plant and could rival Zeppelin (up till recently anyway).
Long and short is this - only read the book for the history of Zeppelin not the comparisons with other bands. Mick Wall nearly ruined the book due to his in accuracies.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars bought it for a friend., 15 April 2014
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bought it for a friend. Mostly revamped stuff. Also has a wierd way of writing,wouldn't recommend it for a fan or a reader.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Story Remains The Same, 3 Jan 2014
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Nothing wrong at all with this account of the triumph-to-tragedy history of Led Zeppelin.
As with any LZ bio, one is never far away from the usual superlatives 'Giants', 'Monsters', 'Power and glory' etc that are so often employed to describe Zeppelin's breathless rise to artistic and commercial dominance. Equally, no plausible account can avoid the sinister misery that clouded the second half of the seventies for the band, and Wall defines perfectly the fulcrum of the '75 period.
It's interesting to compare this work with Barney Hoskyn's 'eye-witness' compilation to illustrate the tragic inevitability that grabs hold of the band's fortunes in the late seventies. There really is no room for revisionism here and surely no new revelations that might take the story in a fresh direction.
Any new Led Zeppelin biog, therefore, can only distinguish itself by adding detail to hitherto glossed over background subjects. In this case, for instance, Wall fleshes out the various plagiarism allegations in some detail. Later, considerable space is given to a more balanced view of Aliester Crowley and Jimmy Page's immersion in his teachings and other occult interests.
So, we all know the story and nothing changes here; Wall tells it as well as anyone. Well worth a go.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Glorified hatchet job, 3 Aug 2013
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This review is from: When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin (Paperback)
The final two chapters are such a nosedive it ruins what came before. Shame the author didn't get the interview with Jimmy Page he so badly wanted. I guess he's just not important enough. Cue hatchet job.
Brad Tolinskis ' Light and Shade ' is a much better book.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dazed & Confused, 8 April 2013
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This review is from: When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin (Paperback)
It's a big improvement on Hammer of the Gods, and everywhere is calling this the "definitive biography". It boasts thorough research, in depth knowledge both personal and research-based, good writing, and a fantastic book jacket. I would have given it five stars if it were not for the following two problems.

Issue One is the italicized second-person detours that are meant to take you "into the head" of various members of Led Zeppelin, Peter Grant, and associates. This awkward literary device is an overly forced way of trying to get you to imagine what it must have been like to have been, say, a young flaxen-haired hippie lad from the Black Country who gets the opportunity of a lifetime.

Issue Two is a sometimes laughably credulous attitude towards the teachings of Aleister Crowley and the O.T.O., which Wall describes at one point as a "great world religion." Now, I'm not saying anything about whether the great world religions are more or less bonkers than O.T.O., but I would hesitate to classify the O.T.O. in such a manner. Why is it necessary to devote so many pages to this topic?

Whatever the reason for the massive word count given over to this topic, all I know is that I often longed to get back to the story of the band and its music and got pretty bloody sick of seeing magic capitalized and spelled with a "K".
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's okay., 5 Mar 2013
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I'm a great Zep fan.
I galloped into this full book of anticipation and for some reason slowed about half way through.
I haven't actually finished it yet. Sorry.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thanks, 29 Jan 2013
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This was a prezzie for my brother in law he loved the condition and it arrived on time this item was descrided as what I was informed postage was very fast and on time
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, 21 April 2012
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This review is from: When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin (Paperback)
I'm not a huge fan but like most people of a certain age I own Led Zep 4 (the one with Stairway) and bought the book to find out about the many myths that surround the band. I was not disappointed as the book is very well researched and the writing transparent. The only parts of the book I didn't enjoy were the section in italics where the author pretends to be in the head of the various band members, if you've read The Damned United you will know what to expect. Thankfully these sections are brief.

The story of the band is clearly laid out here and the background to important issues such as Pages involvement with the occult are intelligently and entertainingly explained.

There is a sense in the book of the speed with which the bands fame took hold, particularly in America and the inevitable fall from being the number one band in the world with drugs, album sales slipping and then the death of John Bonham all taking their toll.

The book ends around 2008 so includes the O2 concert. The author leaves an image of Plant denying his Led Zep history and Page sitting at home waiting for Plant to call him to get the band back on the road.

Good book, whether you are a fan or not you will enjoy this.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highy Professional, 30 Jan 2009
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The sender was highly professional and I'd recommend these guys to anyone who asked.
I ordered and it was with me 3 days later... My dad liked it very much as a Christmas gift too
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When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin
When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography Of Led Zeppelin by Mick Wall (Paperback - 1 Oct 2009)
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