Customer Reviews


414 Reviews
5 star:
 (262)
4 star:
 (87)
3 star:
 (46)
2 star:
 (11)
1 star:
 (8)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Paper Towns
To be totally honest, when I received this book for review I wasn't all that sure about it. Having never read any of John Green's previous work, I don't really know why this was other than I hated the cover. However I'm glad I was sent this one, as it turned out to be the most beautifully written story and I adored every minute.

Quentin (Q) has been infatuated...
Published on 16 July 2010 by Vicki @ Cosy Books

versus
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars a little older than the target audience, but did not enjoy
From the other reviews I can see that this is mostly a well loved book, but I'm afraid it wasn't for me. I found the whole story to be somewhat unbelievable and inconsistent and really struggled to get through the corny dialogue without cringing. I found from the start that the way the three boys spoke to each other was very clichéd and really felt like an adult...
Published 20 months ago by kbearreader


‹ Previous | 1 242 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars a little older than the target audience, but did not enjoy, 3 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
From the other reviews I can see that this is mostly a well loved book, but I'm afraid it wasn't for me. I found the whole story to be somewhat unbelievable and inconsistent and really struggled to get through the corny dialogue without cringing. I found from the start that the way the three boys spoke to each other was very clichéd and really felt like an adult trying to imagine what young people would say to each other.

Unfortunately I also found the premise of the story itself to be very unconvincing; Q is an anxious and cautious person and yet takes relatively little persuasion by Margo to do a number of things which could clearly have a number of serious consequences.
Something he feels compelled to do despite barely knowing Margo.
The character of Lacey is also particularly inconsistent; we hear from Margo that she often makes snide comments and puts her down, but when she befriends Ben she appears to be nothing but pleasant and extremely worried about Margo.

There are aspects of the story which become quite compelling. I found myself reading out of a genuine want to know what happened to Margo. However, around the middle of the book the story drags a lot and I really had to trudge through it to get to the part where they find her again. During this time Q is particularly annoying as a character and really comes across as unnecessarily obsessed and melodramatic. I felt as a reader that it was very much clear that Margo was self-absorbed and inconsiderate, and found it frustrating that Q did not realise this until the point when he meets up with her again.

When they finally did find Margo, there was a huge anti-climax. There was no real mystery to be solved, she just didn't like being at home and wanted to leave - which had pretty much been alluded to throughout the book anyway. However the book then carried on for several pages incoherently talking about metaphors. And the part which frustrated me the most was that Q claimed to love Margo at the end of the book, despite coming to the realisation himself that he did not really know her.

Unfortunately, I was very disappointed by the book. Perhaps the storyline itself is not a bad one and I am older than the target audience, but for me the dialogue and development of the characters was not convincing. I felt that I was never able to get lost in the book as I was very aware of how the author was trying to develop the story throughout.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Paper Towns, 16 July 2010
By 
Vicki @ Cosy Books - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
To be totally honest, when I received this book for review I wasn't all that sure about it. Having never read any of John Green's previous work, I don't really know why this was other than I hated the cover. However I'm glad I was sent this one, as it turned out to be the most beautifully written story and I adored every minute.

Quentin (Q) has been infatuated with his next-door neighbour, Margo, since they were both 9 years old and were involved in a traumatic experience. But to Q, Margo is completely unobtainable; she's magical, courageous, wild and unique where as he's a bit of a geek, self conscious and timid. I wasn't expecting to like and relate to Q as much as I did, not being a teenage male myself. But I'm sure we've all known someone like Margo, who we see as so perfect but completely out of our league, and idolise so much they become almost godlike in our imaginations. He also has all the qualities required so that anyone, of any age can identify with him, with flaws as human as they come. He's a bit dorky, easily embarrassed, obsessive and impatient. He's also sensitive, thoughtful and loyal. Above all though, he's just a really nice kid and someone you would want to be friends with.

The other characters in the book are equally well rounded. Q's friends, Radar and Ben each have their own quirks, which make them completely believable. The dynamics and dialogue between the three miss-fit boys is superb, ranging from hysterically funny, cringe-worthy, contemplative and touching. I really liked seeing such close friendship from a male perspective, something I have rarely come across. Although Margo is the main focus of the book, for the majority she is missing and in solving the mystery of her disappearance, and indeed who she actually is, Q embarks on a surprising journey of self-discovery. Margo herself is exactly what Q imagines her to be to begin. On their one night together she's fun, crazy, vivid, passionate and wild but through Q's investigation, as a reader you are taken on the same journey as he, realizing that the way you see and imagine people is rarely who they really are.

Paper Towns is quite simply a wonderful and beautiful Book. It starts with fun filled energy and continues with intrigue and mystery that will keep you turning the pages. I really wanted to know what had happened to Margo, more than I remember wanting to know the ending of a book for a long time. I couldn't predict any of the plot and it was constantly surprising and fresh. John Green's writing ranges from truly funny one-liners to thoughtful and poignant with a cast of characters you will genuinely truly care about; even days after finishing I'm still thinking about them. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


57 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful in every way possible, 30 July 2009
This review is from: Paper Towns (Hardcover)
It is difficult to write a book for any age group which manages to be funny, serious, interesting, gripping and realistic without losing some form of consistency or structure. But John Green, in his third novel, truly raises the bar. His characters are rich but they never shy from saying things startlingly real and believable. Q, for example, is the perfect teenager without every falling into cliche - he's a bit of a nerd but he's strong and commanding. Margo may be the 'oddball' but, even without personally being in the narrative for most of the book, proves to have depth that backs up her status. The plot is gripping, without driving the characters in any way that does not make perfect sense. The first part, for all it's random requests of Margo for Q gives us something stunningly romantic and original as a way to meet and understand the characters. I can not type higher praise for this book - personally, I think it is one of the books which has stayed with me the most since I first read it, full as it is of images I am sure I will never shake in my lifetime.

I would recommend anyone, young or old, to read this book. What it will give you is an experience that not only will you enjoy but that maybe you might get something out of. I live in the UK, and I had to buy this book on Amazon because it is not published here; apparently, the UK are not receptive to YA novels of this nature. All I can say is, it's a shocking indictment on us, and not the book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad!, 29 Jun 2011
By 
A. Lucas "bookworm" (Essex, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
I realise I'm perhaps not in the target audience for this book, being a 46 year old mum of 3, but it sounded intriguing and had lots of great reviews. It was a bit of a disappointment really. Not much actually happened - a boy goes searching for a troubled girl who lives next door and has run away from home. The clues he follows reminded me of that old gameshow 3-2-1.......... they could have meant absolutely anything, it was just sheer luck that he managed to be on the right track! I think I liked his friends and her friend more than I liked the main characters - in fact the main girl just got on my nerves with her selfishness and need for attention.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well written, 14 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
Was a good read but was quite long and slow moving for what it was. I felt it needed a stronger plot to sustain interest and look at the characters in more depth. Still a well written and enjoyable book though :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I love John Green, but this was a disappointment., 4 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
As a lover of John Green's other novels I had high hopes for this one, especially with all the positive reviews. However, I felt like this book was particularly aimed at teenagers, and at 20 years old I am not much older than the characters yet I found it extremely difficult to relate to any of them. The characters were extremely annoying and inconsistant, the storyline was boring after the first quarter of the book and it was all so unrealistic and infuriating.

The book is about Quentin, an 18 year old senior, who goes looking for his next door neighbour Margo - who he is in love with - when she goes missing after a night of driving around Orlando together pulling pranks of classmates. Sounds like an alright storyline eh? Well, unfortunately Margo is one of the most inconsiderate, annoying and selfish characters I have ever came across in a book and it made me really not care if she was found dead or alive. Quentin can't seem to see that she does not want to be found and is doing this without thinking of anyone but herself, and spends the entire book waffling on about how he doesn't really know her (but still says he's in love with her?!?!).
The other characters are just as annoying and seem to change personalities halfway through the book with no explanation.

The last month of their senior year is ruined, they miss their graduation and I have wasted hours of my life all because Quentin insist on going on a wild goose chase after a girl who likes to play with people. It was amusing at times, the first part was entertaining (but still shows how Quentin has no balls and just does whatever Margo tells him without any questions) and John Green certainly has a way with words and somethings said really did get to me. The underlying message of the book was great but it was terribly portrayed, and we also had to read the same poem 234 times.

Disappointed but if you were on a very long flight like I was then I suppose it will pass the time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable romp, 6 Aug 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Kindle Edition)
A thoroughly enjoyable book. Took me back to my teenage years; angst, infatuation and the onset of responsibility. A perfect summer read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly brilliant in every way!, 18 Sep 2011
This review is from: Paper Towns (Hardcover)
John Green is just one of those authors you'll remember. All of his books are written so well, they'll have you laughing out loud and thinking really deeply about yourself. Its so nice to find something that get the balance right! I would definitely recommend this book to everyone its just THAT good. The story line is amazing and the way its told. BRAVO JOHN!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A hilarious adventure!, 2 Sep 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
Let me start by saying that my fellow passengers on my bus home today must all think I'm completely nuts
after this book had me laughing out loud! I thoroughly enjoyed every second of this book and so glad this was
bought me as a gift!

The story is from the point of view of Q otherwise known as "Quentin" and his relationship with a very mysterious
girl named Margo Roth Spieglemann. A girl who Q has known most of his life. He describes Margo as being his miracle,
because of all the places in all of Florida Margo moved in next door to him. He's always been in awe of Margo
thinking her a complete mystery, someone exciting and surprising, and unattainable. As they grow up they drift apart
and Q goes to admiring her form afar. However, even though Q and his friends are on the botoom end of the pecking
order at school, his one time friendship with Margo has kept them protected from the bullies.

The story starts mere weeks before graduation and Margo turning up with a painted black face at his window very
late at night, determined to get him to be her wheel man whilst she carries out her epic plan for the people
in her life who she feels have wronged her. Mostly because of his secret affection for her he evntually agrees to
go along with her schemes and ultimately has the most amazing night of his life. The next day Margo has vanished.

Everyone tells him that she's just after attention and will turn up but Q is left very worried and determined to
track her down. He finds what appear to be clues in her bedroom and with the help of his two hilarious friends
Ben and Radar he begins a quest to figure out the clues and ultimately bring Margo back to Orlando.

We follow Q through his investigations, his desperate searches and constant wonderings, trying to figure out
who the real Margo was hoping that might lead him to her. Its very funny and also sad and heartwarming.
He cares for her so much, but he doesn't really know her and only figures it out once he really sees Margo
for who she really is and not who he wants her to be.

John Green has a unique way of writing. Its incredibly descriptive in that I could easily picture the world he
was creating and all the things and crazy antics that happened in the book. His characters were spot on and he
writes humour very effectively. I don't know if I've ever read anything funnier that when one character
confesses that he can't take his girlfriend home because his parents own one of the worlds largest collections
of black santas! John Green could easily become on of my fav authors. 've already ordered "Looking for Alaska"
I can't recommend this highly enough. If you want a story with heart, epic road trips and adventures and a bit
of meat to it, then you won't be disappointed by this!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 12 Oct 2011
This review is from: Paper Towns (Paperback)
This is another great book from the author of the excellent Looking for Alaska.
Quentin Jacobsen has always loved his neighbour Margo Roth Speigelman. They aren't really friends by the time they reach their final year of high school so he is surprised and excited the night she knocks on his window and takes him on a late night prank spree. Then Margo disappears on one of her trips, her parents say they won't let her come back home this time, and Quentin finds himself investigating the hidden life of Margo Roth Speigelman.

This is a great book by turns funny, insightful, intriguing and poignant. It includes poetry by Walt Whitman, crass humour, a sense of dread, and an exploration of how we relate to people. It's nice to see a book in which a girl who is the object of the main character's affection is shown to be both more and less than he expects her to be. Quentin realises that he put Margo on a pedestal and discovers that not only did he fail to understand her, but so did everyone who knew her. Everyone has their own version of Margo, and none of them can explain her. The book played with my expectations at every step and I honestly wasn't sure how it would end.
This is a great book and I would recommend John Green's books to any teens (or indeed adults) who want an interesting, entertaining and also meaningful read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 242 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Paper Towns
Paper Towns by John Green (Paperback - 19 Dec 2013)
£3.85
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews