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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading for all who care about our planet and our health
Thoroughly recommend this book to everyone who cares about the planet and all who live on it. The routine use of antibiotics in factory farmed animals should be of concern to all of us, as should the squandering of resources to feed these animals, and the plight of the smaller farmers put out of business by industrial style farmers. Something needs to be done. Starting...
Published 5 months ago by Oswald

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Should read
When are we going to wake up, we don't have a food shortage, but too many people on the planet.
We need to start controlling that, before we kill every thing of beauty and diversity.
Or we will end up with no wild life and just a concrete jungle. Who wants to live like that.
This book talk's about how we treat animals and the cruel ways we slaughter them,...
Published 5 months ago by marc


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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading for all who care about our planet and our health, 17 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
Thoroughly recommend this book to everyone who cares about the planet and all who live on it. The routine use of antibiotics in factory farmed animals should be of concern to all of us, as should the squandering of resources to feed these animals, and the plight of the smaller farmers put out of business by industrial style farmers. Something needs to be done. Starting with ensuring decision-makers understand the problem and take the appropriate steps to avert Farmageddon (and that includes consumers deciding what to buy) . I must add that this is a highly readable book.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What we should all know about the industrial farming of farm animals., 16 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
An absolute 'must read' for all who care about our planet, its people and its farm animals. The hidden truths of factory farming are exposed - and not pleasant. We can, and MUST, change. Bravo to the authors, and all those connected with the publication, of this far reaching book. Buy it, read it and pass it on.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Outstanding Book, 17 Feb 2014
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Anyone who cares a jot about our planet should read this book. The book highlights the skewed approach that is all to often being used to produce (and waste) our food and in the process severely damage our world.
We should all be extremely grateful to the authors for bringing the all to often catastrophic consequences of factory farming to our attention and praise them for all the time and dedicated hard work they put into producing this unique and valuable book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We Ignore this at our Peril, 17 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
A brilliant exposition of our international food system and the damage it is doing to animals, the environment, our health, wildlife, etc.

Three years' work has never produced such a wake-up call. Read it, become informed, and make the adjustments to your life that you may well find necessary. This is the first time that all the effects of industrial farming have been so holistically explained and they are horrifying.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read it and believe it!, 17 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
This book exposes the inconvenient truth about where so much of our food comes from. And where might that be? It could be from a dairy farm where the cows never get to graze and live on concrete floors or outdoor mud baths. it might be from a pig farm where the pregnant mothers never get to turn round throughout their long pregnancies. If you don't look for the labels declaring free range or organic, this could be what you're getting. But of course, as Farmageddon makes so abundantly clear it's not just the suffering of our fellow sentient beings that's so important, but the impact of factory farming on the whole planet - the outrageous use of nearly 40% of the world's cereals and over 90% of soymeal just to feed to farm animals, when so many fellow humans are going hungry to bed every night; the polluting greenhouse gases and the stinking effluent that damages our rivers and even parts of our oceans. But Farmageddon is not a list of horrors - it's a beautifully written and deeply personal account, which makes it an easy read, but a truly challenging one. Let's hope we are all brave enough to take that challenge.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Devastating critique of factory farming, 2 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
People tend to think of a farm as a place where animals roam around, the farmer attends their crops and happy birds sing from the trees, this book states that image is a PR spin of what farming used to be like because in the last 50 years farming has changed and the factory farm has become the norm. Factory farms specialise, the meat farms make only meat, the plant farms grow only a single type of plant.

The meat factory farms are grim places where animals spend their lives trapped indoors, squeezed in to tiny areas barely able to move. The factory meat farms pump out massive amounts of manure that is just dumped creating massive pits of excrement. A large hog farm of 800,000 pigs in America can generate 1.6 million tones of manure annually, more than 1.5 million residents of a city like Philadelphia. Because the meat factory farm specialise in just making meat they have no crops to fertilise and the manure just sits there devastating fishing and tourist industries and contaminating the drinking water.

The people that live by these mega farms have terrible health from the pollution, heart disease, birth defects and childhood asthma are all a lot higher than the national average and massive swarms of flies infest the entire area.

For the plant growing factory farm, they grow a single crop in massive amounts, having to buy fertilizers and using pesticides to keep away the bugs. Birdsong, once the key feature of the English countryside is all but disappeared as the pesticides that kill bugs have moved up the foot chain, killing the nations' birds. In the last forty years the population of tree sparrows has dropped by 97%, gray partridges by 90%, turtle doves by 89%, corn bunting by 86%, skylarks by 61%, yellowhammers by 56% starlings by 85% and song thrushes by 48%.

Bee populations in the UK and USA have crashed as well, the British Beekeeper Association believe that the UK could lose all its bees in the next decade. The problem is so bad in America farmers are having to rent lorries of bees to come to their farms to pollinate the crops, when the inevitable crashes happen swarms of millions of bees are released causing chaos on the roads. Insect pesticides and lack of diversity in single crop farms are believed to be the reason behind the bee population decline.

Fish farms use nets to block off farmed areas from the rest of the water but sea lice still get through devastating the tightly packed farmed fish and turning the farm into a massive fish lice factory that reinfects the local water system destroying the wild population. Farmed salon and trout contains more fat than wild and higher levels of contaminants. Because of differences in diet between wild and farmed fish, the flesh of the farmed fish is gray which consumers don't like so dyes are used to make the fish the same pink colour as the wild.

Fish farm require massive amounts of food to feed the fish, usually fishmeal (small fish, crushed into oil and dry feed). The fishmeal factories in Peru pollute the local area destroying the wildlife and poising the locals.

Tightly packed in farm areas are a breeding ground for virus. Attempts at using antibiotics to treat infected animals causes new antibiotic resistant super virus to emerge and when these virus jump the species barrier, infect humans who now cannot be treated with antibiotics. Swine flu being the perfect example of this.

Factory farming has stripped much of the nutrients from food, a single organic chicken from the 1970's contains the same nutrients as four factory farmed chickens today. Pasture reared beef has 25% less fat and free range and organic chicken up to 50% less fat. Free range eggs have up to double the vitamin E and three times the beta-carotene. Factory farm food is geared towards quantity not quality.

Factory farmed chickens have been selectivity bred to grow very fast, their legs, heart and lungs unable to keep pace with their weight gain, this results in them being barely able to walk.

The factory farmed animals instead of eating grass and other no use to humans plants instead are fed food like soya or wheat, food that could have been eaten by people, this demand for food from factory farms drives up prices on those foods for everybody.

Genetically modified (GM) crops are seen as the solution for more food problems, but there are problems with GM, research by the Russian Academy of Sciences found that rodents fed Gm-soya lost the ability to reproduce with three generations. An international team of scientists found that rats fed on GM corn eat more and got fatter than those on non GM diet. The effect was repeated when rats were fed fish that in turn had eaten GM food. Research from the university of Caen found rats fed a lifelong diet of GM corn developed breast tumors and liver and kidney problems( unfortunately this book does not mention the arguing over the credibility of these experiments ). GM is banned in UK but there are no rules against giving farm animals GM food,

The farmers themselves although getting more revenue now actually make less profit because of all the fertilizers, equipment etc they now need and the powerful interests that sell fertilizers, equipment etc are unlikely to want this broken system to change.

All these sounds very depressing, but does the consumer really care why it is their food is so cheap?
It would seem that yes they do, After Compassion in World Farming brought a private prosecution against monks of Norbertine 'white canons' for raising veal using barbaric veal crates, the media lapped up the story of ascetic monks inflicting cruelty on veal and when the public learned how veal is made the veal market in England collapsed. So people do care but unfortunately the supermarkets use misleading labeling on food to deceive people about what they are buying, for example chicken with 'corn fed' on the label means nothing as most factory chickens are corn fed anyway.

And what is the solution to all this? The author recommended a return to the old ways of mixed farming( plants and animals on the same farm). No more giant pits of excrement, instead the farmer uses the manure to fertilize their crops, so no need to buy fertilizer. Animals roam freely eating grass etc not trapped in a shed all day been fed food that could have been eaten by people. These results in a more environmentally sustainably farm, higher quality food and less cruelty to animals. Also the consumer can be savvy about what they buy (and the supermarket's misleading labeling) and avoid factory farmed food

This book is an excellent read and I thoroughly recommend it.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exposing the madness of factory farming, 16 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
Certainly not anti famers but unashamedly anti factory farming. This book shouldn't really be controvertial at all as many of the views seem such common sense and self evident you wonder why you haven't thought of them before. Farmageddon could and should prove to be a landmark book and act as a catalyst for change. Surely no-one wants our beautiful countryside and wildlife destroyed.
As they say, every purchase is a vote for the kind of world we want to live in. Let's think about the effect of our actions on people, animals and the environment and not blindly follow the USA.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and Frightening, 17 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
A really frightening look into the truth. Highly recommended for the more conscientious among us. Ignore the trolls, embrace the scary truth. Because without truth, we are uninformed and blind. Seek and learn, live in reality, conscientiously.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You know you've written a good book when they send trolls to try to trash it!, 16 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
This book was a very frightening look at what our world is becoming because we would all rather shop with our heads buried in the sand. Judging by the troll reviews I've just read of this book then its hit the nail on the head and we should all be very scared of whats coming!! An absolute must read for anybody who worries about what world their children will be living in soon.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thought provoking book that shows why factory farming is bad for people as well as animals, 16 Feb 2014
This review is from: Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat (Paperback)
It was visiting a 'factory' farm owned by a friend of my parents that turned me veggie. I'm from rural Lincolnshire and had no idea what goes on inside those sheds full of pigs and chickens you can see from the road. I just couldn't get my head round why the thoroughbred horses out in fields were treated so well yet the pigs in the shed were in barren pens their whole miserable lives. However, many people have no knowledge of how the animals they eat live and die or if they do, no problem that some animals such as cats and dogs are revered whilst other, often more intelligent and sentient, such as pigs and cattle are treated differently because they are 'food'. That's why Philip's approach in this book, to demonstrate why factory farming is bad for all of us, is so refreshing and important.

This book points out that industrial farming systems will produce industrial waste and that pollution is having a negative impact on human health all over the world. It also negatively impacts on other economic sectors such as tourism, where industrial farming waste is destroying e.g. the coral reef in Australia or beaches in Brittany.

We are having to shift our thinking in many areas due to increases in human population and climate change. The very welcome improvements in standards of living across developing countries are leading to increased meat consumption, which leads to greater stress on resources such as water and cereals, as well as greater rates of obesity and other health problems resulting from excessive consumption of meat and processed foods. Philip's excellent book is full of important facts such as that 1/3 of the world's grain is used to feed farm animals when it could be used to feed 3bn people instead. It's more important than ever that people are mindful of what they are consuming and think about sustainability, even if the couldn't care less about the suffering of billions of animals who live and die in industrial systems. People should be challenged to consider the benefits to themselves, animals and humanity of eating less meat and ensuring that meat is pasture raised so not consuming cereals that should be used to feed people, instead, feeding on pasture that has no arable potential. Isn't that common sense? It's not an attack on farmers, omnivores or anyone else. We need new solutions to cope with new problems.

It's disappointing to read 'reviews' on here that attack Compassion in World Farming - a charity established by a farmer who was appalled by the cruelty of new farming practices introduced in the 1960s. It's not surprising though, after recent attacks by sections of the press and 'countryside' (bloodsports) groups on any organisation who is trying to improve welfare for farmed animals. I've got 12 sheep at home who are incredibly sensitive and characterful animals. It's a national disgrace that live exporters are allowed to take thousands of such animals on a horrific journey by sea and road for days on end. I'm incredibly grateful that charities like CIWF are working so hard to raise awareness of this cruelty and bring about its end.

A fascinating and timely book.
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Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat
Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat by Philip Lymbery (Paperback - 27 Jan 2014)
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