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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 29 August 2012
This is the first of the authors books I have read, it was the title that attracted me and I thought I would learn a great deal from it. It is basically a book about mankind`s connection with the sea over the ages. The author himself suggests that this book need not be read in the traditional manner and that it would be OK to dash about reading chapters out of sync. I chose not to. The book gives ideas and factual accounts of how man migrated over and explored the seas and Oceans, for example how polynensia/oceania was populated and how trade developed in Arabia/Africa. This is trip around the world using the authors substantial knowledge of the sea ( he is a great experienced sailor). I must say though that I did not learn as much new as I had hoped, even though I have read little on this subject. Much of it I have picked up before through periodicals and TV documentaries. Nevertheless, the authors explanation of winds, currents and archaeological evidence points to some fascinating conclusions. I particularly found the chapters on Arabia, East Africa and also the Aleutians very interesting.
I am pleased I bought this book, but it did not give me the `wow` factor, but maybe I knew a bit more about the subject than I originally thought.
A good interesting read though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 6 December 2013
A very interesting review of the origins of navigation and seamanship, starting from the exploration of Oceania on double sailing canoes.
The author, an anthropologist and he himself a sailor, describes how the ocean currents and winds can be deciphered and exploited in the absence of modern navigation instruments. This introductory, easily readable text tells about the origins of the arts of orienteering, boat-building, and sailing. Navigation started during the stone age, much before iron or even bronze became available, using dugouts canoes either paddled or downwind sailed; to return home the ancient mariners exploited predictable reversal of the prevalent winds, patience and rudimentary orientation with the stars. In spite of these limits and at the cost of many lives these ancient mariners were able to cover thousands of miles of open ocean and to populate remote islands.
A beautiful story, nicely written.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 24 September 2012
brilliant book written by an expert who also has hands on experience of sailing, and can convey a real feeling of sailing with these remarkable adventurers
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 18 November 2012
Got to say I was disappointed with this book -it had so much potential so much to teach us and is well written BUT it left so much out, ignored the presence of so many other books that explore this area in other ways that I felt it answered little. At the end I felt it was repetitive as the same thing was discussed only the area in the world changed. Learning how we moved around the world, discovered new places, new ideas , new techniques, is fascinating but not so much in this book .Well written but so conservative that it failed to inspire me or even answer real questions, probably because it never asked any. Disappointed as there was so much to tell and it is well written just lacks any GO Beyond the Blue Horizon: How the Earliest Mariners Unlocked the Secrets of the Oceans
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 12 January 2013
Becomes a bit like a textbook after the initial excitement of the opening chapters, but I will continue to dip into it and probably take advantage of the references to explore areas of particular interest to me.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 February 2014
Has its moments - some fascinating, some dull. A decent holiday read for those fed up with Hello and OK.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2013
I like this book, but it is a bit mystical, so hard going sometimes. Just like this review really .
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 1 November 2012
Why the publishers insist on putting the metric version of every measurement - any there are many - in parentheses after every one when it would be so much simpler to establish them at the start is a source of annoyance on just about every page. Otherwise it's OK but not well written and feels like inadequately researched.
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