Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

15
3.1 out of 5 stars
Lucky Break
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£7.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 July 2011
First of all let me say that I throughly enjoyed this book, but I would have liked to have read the orginal more cynical draft which Freud produced before showing it to her husband the successful British actor David Morrissey. Apparently she said on BBC news that when she showed him one of her earlier drafts to him he said "You've forgotten to say it's the best job in the world." After which she rewrote it. Yes the acting profession must be one of the best jobs in the world if you are successful, but many people suffer hardship, insecurity, jealousy, depression etc. Freud attempted to cover this in her book, but maybe if she had included some of her own experiences as a struggling actor rather than been influenced by the successes of others it mightn't have been such a light read! Also I would have liked the book to include the experiences of an actor from a working class background in what is basically a middle class profession! Perhaps those looking for a more cynical read should look at Barbara Ewing's The Actresses. Saying all this I would recommend Lucky Break, but there is always room for improvement.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2011
I really enjoyed this book, although having read the comment that Esther Freud originally wrote a harsher, more cynical version, I concur with the wish that she'd stuck to it! Yes, acting is the best profession on the world, but only for a charmed minority, I suspect. She's very good on how vile Los Angeles is (or can be!), but I'd have liked more about the student years of her characters. I like Esther Freud's work a lot, but I'd suggest anyone coming new to her work should start with 'Hideous Kinky' to get a taste of her at her absolute best.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
As an actor in training myself, I found it enjoyable to read because it was like reading about people I actually know. Freud captures the actor's struggle in a clever, funny and sensitive way. I will recommend it to my mother because I think she still thinks all we do is sit around reading plays to each all day, acomplishing nothing. I've been waiting for this kind of book to surface!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 13 October 2013
Lucky break charts episodes from the interlinked lives of a bunch of aspiring actors who meet at drama school and remain loosely in touch for over a decade after.

As she's been to drama school herself and is married to an actor, Freud has no shortage of material, and the book is rich in absurd details of both the successes and the frustrations of struggling young thespians, ranging from penguins and pantomimes through to staged conversation with members of the royal family.

The large cast and the episodic nature of the narrative requires quite a bit of attention from the reader. Sometimes I felt like I had to keep track of somebody else's facebook friends, but as the characters mature and their paths diverge, it becomes easier to remember who's who. Also, it may help to read the book a bit more swiftly than I did.

It all sorts itself out by the end though, and I felt rewarded for staying the course. I'm almost tempted to start over again, now that I know who's who. The other perk of reading this is that as a freelance writer I suddenly feel I have an amazingly sane and stable career compared to what these poor souls have to deal with.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 April 2012
I read this book in 2 sittings (which is unusual for me as I am a slow reader). Not because I was so riveted that I couldn't put it down, but because I was waiting for something interesting to happen. The subsequent discussion at my book club revealed that I was not alone in this assessment and we all agreed that it lacked a certain spark or emotional interest. Not a bad book, but a bit dull.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Too fragmented, this novel is a sort of mosaic where the "tesserae" are too separated and I found difficult to follow the stories in it.
I feel disappointed: I have appreciated Ms Freud in her previous novels, but this has not been a pleasure, rather an exercise for my memory to try to recollect when and where a character had appeared and who was who.
Pity.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 16 May 2014
This is a bit of an odd book. It works, in itself, but I can't help feeling like it could have been so much more. The back cover blurb gives the impression that it's going to be the story of the students at drama school (the unconvincingly named 'Drama Arts'), but the student period only takes up a small part of the book. Freud creates very convincing characters, but unfortunately there are too many of them for us to be able to spend any decent period of time with any one character. As a result, the reader is left wanting more each time a chapter ends and the focus switches to someone else. It feels a bit like flicking between a couple of very good movies on different channels; each time you switch to a new one, you miss a huge chunk of the other stories. I wanted to know more about each of the characters and felt quite let down at the end that I hadn't been able to.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 5 June 2011
I picked up this book because of its attractive cover; but having read the first page in the bookshop I knew I was going to love it. 'Lucky Break' is really easy reading and I finished it within 24 hours of buying it (which for me, with three young children on half term holidays, is super speedy). It has a televisual quality, and I enjoyed the highs and lows of the three main protagonists as they arrive at drama school and the subsequent years that follow their successes and failures. Whilst superficially having a "chic-lit" plot, the novel gives depth to its characters, raising it above the usual romantic fodder: thoroughly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 11 June 2012
Esther Freud's writing never quite delivers. It flatters to deceive and leaves strands unresolved and the reader feeling slightly unsatisfied. However its fictional structure aside, this is probably a pretty accurate picture of what it is like to try to make your way in the acting profession. It seems a realistic and therefore cautionary tale and should probably be required reading for anyone thinking of making acting their life.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 19 June 2011
Having attended the drama school so thinly disguised by Esther Freud in this novel I looked forward to comparing a seminal time in my life. No such luck. This superficial account trades the authentic for generalised cliches. It's infuriating. So much of what is written about the theatre - the narcissism, backslapping, bitching, tantrums and neuroses - only serves to feed the generally received idea of the profession. And in any case it's out of date. Real life for the modern actor is so much more complex, surprising and tough. There are some sharply observed moments here, revealing the fact that the author knows this world from first hand. But this only serves to highlight the novel's deficiencies. We skip from episode to episode in the lives of a group of actors without ever being made to care about what happens to them. There are almost no references to the world at large and by the time we reach the end - the Royal Gala premiere - we might as well be reading Hello! without the benefit of that magazine's glossy photos . A big disappointment.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Mr Mac and Me
Mr Mac and Me by Esther Freud (Paperback - 18 Jun. 2015)
£3.85

The Sea House
The Sea House by Esther Freud (Paperback - 29 April 2004)
£8.99

Love Falls
Love Falls by Esther Freud (Paperback - 2 Jun. 2008)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.