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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 23 March 2011
Another travelogue about south east Alaska from the author of The Blue Bear: A True story of Friendship, Tragedy, and Survival in the Alaskan Wilderness. A nice mix of a walking trip told from a first person perspective, interspersed with the history of the region itself. He keeps the journey and the history parts separate, and switches back and fore between them, which helps keep up the interest level.

He writes from a very personal perspective about his journey and the current state of his life (a recent failed relationship). I found it very readable and interesting as he made his way through the difficult landscape. The history parts are also interesting and always focussed on the individual people involved and their lives and the incidents that occurred.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 23 June 2012
This one turned out slightly different to what I have expected, given the blurb on the back, I thought the book would be mainly about Schooler's trip, but I realised by the time I had reached half way into the book, and Schooler had yet to start his walk, that there was more to this than simply the telling of the tale. Ultimately, this is because Schooler's trip, in itself, is only a week or so long, not really a great undertaking that can hold a full length narrative together. And, to be honest, not much really happens (well apart from... but that would be spoilers!). But that doesn't mean this isn't an interesting and enjoyable read. Schooler uses the walk as a platform to relate stories of many who have lived and travelled through this area, bringing the wilderness alive with memories of human passage. Towards the end of the book, Schooler observes a flock of sandpipers, and comes to an understanding of the power of continuity. Facing his own demons which had led him to this point, he realises: "It does not matter if we are forgotten; what matters is the effect we have on those around us, and those who come after us. What matters is how our lives affect the larger, perpetual community of the living." It is a touching moment in a book that is as much about Schooler as it is the vast wilderness in which he seeks to walk. In seeing this, Schooler sets off to "walk home", more aware now of the true meaning of this idea. Schooler writes engaging history, and lays his soul bare at times painfully, but for me overall, the thinness of the actual narrative of the walk itself left me wanting something more from this book than it offered.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 10 September 2010
But for the serialisation of this book, I would not have come across it. I heard one episode in a read abridged version and just had to get the book. I was certainly rewarded well. A fine narrative describing an Alaskan adventure; taking the reader into situations that are real and dangerous. Who needs fiction when modern explorers write so grippingly of actual events. Lynn Schooler also manages to give us an insight into his own character balanced perfectly with the adventure itself.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 25 February 2012
Just finished reading this book and really enjoyed it. Felt like I was on the journey with him and could imagine the landscape with the vivid descriptions. Enjoyed the way he wove the history of the people of the region as well as explorers that visited it. Being a lover of the outdoors I appreciated the bushcraft and survival skills that Schooler hones to his advantage.
The account of the tsunami, shipwreck and injured bear encounter had me gripped and his wildlife knowledge was truly educational. Great read and I'm about to order "The Blue Bear"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 3 January 2013
I liked this book so much I read it twice. Nice balance of philosophy about relationships, bits of historical factsabout the area he lives and travels in and travellers tale. Well writtten and thoughfully traced, brings Alaska to life.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 8 September 2010
I spent five days exploring Alaska with Lynn Schooler........feeling his fears..elation..and pain. There were many stories within his story. A truly great real life adventure..combined with some personal drama and emotional turmoil thrown in.
A great read. Lynn
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on 25 September 2013
A well written and entertaining book. At times during the narrators travels in the northern wilderness one became quite concerned as bears (both fit and injured) made his travels hazardous! A good read, well recommended.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 7 June 2011
I read a newspaper review of this book and the publishers blurb. It seemed to be my type of book and it was a reasonable read. The title of the book is 'Walking Home' but I think that title is perhaps less about the physical walk and more about the psychological walk. I was half-way through the book before the author began his Alaskan walk. The first half of the book is spent setting the scene, telling us the history of the area and also bemoaning the intimations of mortality triggered by deaths of friends and acquaintances, and the apparent death of the author's brief and recent marriage.

Eventually Lynn Schooler sails out of Juneau bound for Lituya Bay the jumping off point for his walk on the wild side. He has a great knowledge of the birds, animals and plants of the Alaskan Spring and shares that interwoven with the history of its native peoples and those travellers of European extraction who passed by and through it over the past 300 years. The vast devastation of the great tsunamis in the Bay; the shipwrecks; the prospectors and even a modern-day hermit on an island. The tales of what they did linger on but there is little physical remembrance of them, the earth has reclaimed all of that.

Mr Schooler lays his soul bare and throughout the book he engages in painful self examination. He does not always like what he sees when soul-searching. At times I felt like giving him a shake and saying 'snap out of it this is getting depressing'. (Almost to the point of self-pity) It all goes to build up the sense of foreboding and looming disaster which threads through the story line. Then suddenly in the final 30 pages or so the book and narrative change gear as he encounters a grizzly bear which does not run away but instead has designs to eat him. Man and beast, hunter and hunted, but with the normal roles reversed. When at real risk of death he is at his most vibrant and full of life. It is a thrilling piece of writing and contrasts with the rest of the book. He remarks on the contrast himself. I know that we cannot expect every day to be enlivened by a life threatening bear but it might have done him and the reader a little bit of good to encounter at least one other prospective man-eater along the way.
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on 19 April 2015
excellent service, price, and delivewry
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 6 October 2012
Excellent account of a guy walking in the wilderness of Alaska. including his terrifying experience of meeting a bear. Read it after hearing it on Book of the Week
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