Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A heavy tome but good to read, 28 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
A very interesting book about the history of food. Not so much about cooking but what and how we have eaten through the ages
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars One to buy!, 2 April 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
What can you say, the man is a total genius. This book is a delight to own and read, well put together and a beautiful addition to any bookshelf. Heston is without doubt my favourite chef; the majority of his creations I would not even attempt. That being said, the very fact that he does is testament to his skill. There are a couple in this book that are infinitely 'do-able' with a little patience but like a lot of his creations, they require a laboratory, an army of helpers and the skill of a brain surgeon. That being said, I love it; worth every penny paid!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great gift for aspiring chefs, 31 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
Heston takes you step by step through the processes (from inspiration and by way of trial and error) to the creation of a great dish.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sorry But "it’s the culinary road to nowhere except a very few restaurants", 31 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
It’s a good time for Heston Blumenthal. His Fat Duck restaurant in Bray has kept its maximum three Michelin stars, while his Dinner by Heston Blumenthal in London has been awarded its second

Among the recipes it contains is one for a wonderful dish served at Dinner: “Meat fruit”, a life-like tangerine with an aromatic orange zest, topped by a stem with a couple of leaves. The “peel” resists the knife and fork much as a mandarin would; but inside it turns out to be a savoury mousse of chicken livers and foie gras, flavoured with port, brandy and Madeira, while the skin is made from gelatine and mandarin purée. It’s an elaborate, delicious joke, and something like it was one of the surprise dishes served to guests at a feast for the coronation of Henry IV in 1399.

I openly admit that Blumenthal is a genius, and you are very lucky that, if you have the money and the patience to reserve a table, we can order his gastronomic marvels: his science-inspired bacon and egg ice cream or snail porridge at the Fat Duck, for example..
But these difficult/impossible cookery books are not exclusive to Heston. Indeed, they represent a cutting-edge publishing trend. René Redzepi, the Albanian-Danish chef of Noma has published "A Work in Progress: Journal, Recipes and Snapshots, with food you can’t expect to do at home unless you have a supply of moose fillet, reindeer tongues and black ants.
Then theres Ferran Adrià, who has closed his celebrated Catalan restaurant, El Bulli, has published a mind-boggling catalogue raisonné of the dishes he invented between 1994 and 1997 and now the new Box set out in March (yes I have pre-ordered)
Mugaritz: A Natural Science of Cooking by the amazing Andoni Luis Aduriz reveals all in its title.
I have tried some recipes from Faviken by Magnus Nilsson and managed one or two of them – though they took several weeks. And there are many more examples.

I have been asking what are these books for?

On the whole, you can’t cook from them at home. Are they simply to look at? And if so, are they a kind of food pornography, intended to make us drool over or lust for their art-directed photographs of edibles?

This is a bit old hat foodie porn started as long ago as the early 80's With Mossimann and a like, but fashions change, and maybe "snails slithering up a silver chafing dish do it for you in a way a color photo of a juicy steak no longer does".

Perhaps these cook books are a signal that our relationship with food itself is changing. Trends in eating and cooking have traditionally followed the post-revolutionary French bourgeois cookery was influenced by the cuisine of Louis XVI’s court then the grand German Bauhaus era.

Culinary fashion usually travels in a top-down direction, just as present-day British eating habits (and supermarket shelves) reflect what’s happening in restaurant kitchens. Lemon grass, root ginger, bulgur, crème fraîche, sumac, poblano chillies, balsamic vinegar and smoked paprika aren’t escapees from some foodie zoo, they’re in Waitrose and Sainsbury’s because their customers have tasted dishes that incorporate them in restaurants (or seen them used by telly chefs).

This is the glory of retail. But centrifuges, vacuum packers and thermostats on every kitchen gadget? Surely these are leading home cooking straight into a cul-de-sac – it’s the culinary road to nowhere except a few restaurants. All you need at home is a sharp knife, a food processor, some sturdy kitchen scales – and a few Great books by Elizabeth David or Jane Grigson or even Mrs Beeton...

But having ranted on I have to say that it is still an amazing publication and I am glad to have purchased it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 16 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
This is certainly not a beginners book and you have to spend a lot of time just to make a single dish. Some of these recipes have 13-16 different sub-recipe lists within, so good luck.

So far I have made only two of the dishes, but it is really amazing - but do try out the "real thing" in his restaurant "Dinner @ Heston" so you have an idea if it is worth it.

If you have an interest in food history there is a lot of background information on each dish.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars cookbook, 20 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
if you love heston's way of doing things you will love this book ! a book for people who love cookbooks
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Amazing Cookbook!, 5 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Historic Heston (Hardcover)
Amazing book with absolutely stunning photography inside! The lay out is very similar to The Fat Duck Cookbook which is great! I highly recommend this book if your a fan of Heston's work!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Historic Heston
Historic Heston by Heston Blumenthal (Hardcover - 10 Oct 2013)
£81.25
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews