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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book I've read all year!
Revolution is the highly anticipated second novel for young adults by Jennifer Donnelly. I read and adored Jennifer's first novel A Gathering Light when it very first came out at the young age of 14 now 6 years later after a long, painful wait I got the chance to read and review Revolution early much to my delight!

At the beginning of Revolution we're...
Published on 13 Oct 2010 by Jess Hearts Books

versus
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hit and Miss At Times
Jennifer Donnelly's first novel A Gathering Light , (US title A Northern Light), is one of my favourite YA/crossover novels so I was relishing the thought of getting my teeth into "Revolution" - 7 years is a long time to wait!

"Revolution" is a busy novel given that it encompasses so many ideas and themes - love, loss, family relationships, music (lots of...
Published on 20 Mar 2011 by Lovely Treez


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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best book I've read all year!, 13 Oct 2010
By 
Jess Hearts Books (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
Revolution is the highly anticipated second novel for young adults by Jennifer Donnelly. I read and adored Jennifer's first novel A Gathering Light when it very first came out at the young age of 14 now 6 years later after a long, painful wait I got the chance to read and review Revolution early much to my delight!

At the beginning of Revolution we're introduced to cool, incredibly talented Andi a teenage girl living in present day New York. Andi goes to a prestigious private school for talented students and Andi's talent is music. It would seem that Andi has the world at her feet with endless opportunities available to her, it seems like she has it all, and she did but that was before her younger brother Truman died in an accident that Andi believes is her fault. Since Truman's death Andi's family has been slowly falling apart with her mother going insane and her father leaving the family for a younger woman who's pregnant with his child. Drowning in guilt and depression Andi turns to her music to express the thoughts and feelings she cannot say. Andi loses all interest in anything else but her music and risks flunking out of school because of it. Her father - oblivious as to what's going on in his old life - doesn't realise anything's wrong until he gets a call from Andi's school saying that if she fails her thesis she won't graduate. With her mother in a mental health unit and her father flying out to France to work on the mystery of the Lost Dauphin Louis-Charles, Andi has no choice but to go with him. It's in Paris that Andi stumbles upon a lost diary belonging to a girl of her age Alex who worked in the palace looking after Louis-Charles during the French revolution. Captivated by Alex's story and confessions instead of turning the diary in Andi reads on intrigued by the similarities between herself and Alex, Louis-Charles and her brother Truman, and what follows is a page turning historical mystery merging both girls' fates together.

When I started this book I thought it was good but not brilliant. It took a while for the story to really get going for me. It wasn't slow exactly but it just took a good chunk of the book for Jennifer Donnelly to set the story up. However when you get further into the story you see that the book needed that set up so if you're struggling with it I urge you to continue reading because it really is vital to the story and when Andi goes to Paris that's when the book really starts to get going. It was from that point on that I simply could not put this book down. I think that I expected the historical part of the book to start straight away and the first 50 or so pages read very much like a contemporary young adult novel rather than historical fiction so I think that's why I didn't enjoy it as much as the rest of the book. If you expect that from the beginning though then I don't think you'll have a problem.

I don't think main character Andi's the most likeable character out there but she definitely grew on me as I carried on reading. She may not be kind and perfect but she's real and that's why I liked her. She loves, she hates, she's definitely one of the most realistic characters out there for young adults at the moment and I loved her passion for music. Throughout the book you get to read little snippets of Andi's favourite songs and her own music and they really give a gateway into how Andi's feeling. Jennifer Donnelly's characters all have so many layers to them both good and bad. They have depth. Their human, and because of that Revolution felt very real to me like this was really happening which I think is an aspect you really need when re-telling a part of history.

As with Jennifer's first novel A Gathering Light, Revolution is flawlessly written. You can tell that Jennifer's a born storyteller and a beautiful writer - you so easily get wrapped up in her words. I lost track of time on so many occasions because I was so engrossed in this book. It's powerful, beautiful, mesmerising and fascinating. I went into this book not knowing that much about the French revolution and I admit that I was a little wary that I wouldn't enjoy it or understand what was going on but I was so wrong. You don't have to go into this book knowing all of the facts because it explains everything you need to know along the way without it reading like a history text book - in fact quite the contrary. I was so fascinated by the French revolution Jennifer tells its story so well and I'm going to definitely be looking out for more books on the subject in the future.

This book made me feel so many things; the book itself is so many things. It's love and grief, life and death, good and bad and I became so emotionally attached to it that I lost count of how many times I got teary eyed whilst reading. Sometimes because I was sad sometimes because I was happy sometimes because of the sheer beauty of Jennifer Donnelly's writing. You definitely get taken on a journey whilst reading Revolution. Jennifer really brings the French revolution to life. Not only did it feel like I could see and smell everything that was going on around me but I could feel what the characters were going through I could feel their pain and their bloodlust their need for revenge and change. This book has everything love, passion, hate and lessons that are just as current now as they were during the revolution. There are so many important things that this book has to say. It will change the way you think and feel without even trying to. Revolution is the kind of book that will be read and loved by everybody because it has so many things to offer but above all Revolution is a story about doing the right thing, the good thing, forgiveness and moving on. It's about the revolution that we all have inside ourselves over some thing or another. The revolution that's still going on. After finishing this book yesterday afternoon I'm still thinking about it, it's still all going through my mind. It's haunting like the ghost of the revolution itself. Revolution is one of the best books I've ever had the pleasure of reading and I think it's my favourite book that I've read so far in 2010, it's definitely been worth the wait for all these years! Start reading this with the highest of expectations and you still won't be disappointed - not one bit. Highly, highly recommended to everyone. 5 stars.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of A Trillian Books, 10 Oct 2010
By 
Tasha (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
At the beginning of the book, Andi's story is one seen often in YA books - a teenage girl dealing with the death of someone close to her, in this case her younger brother. Trueman's death has deeply effected the family. Her parents have split up; her father remarried; her mother not coping at all well, spending most of her time painting. Andi herself only gets through each day with the help of medication and her music. She's failing miserably at school and because of this her father decides to take her on his business trip to Paris.There she finds a diary. The diary takes us back to the French Revolution and the life of Alexandrine and from this point the book switches back and forth between the two stories.

Donnelly's writing is amazing, with so much detail that I really felt like I was right there in Paris with both of the girls. The amount of historical detail and musical knowledge included is pretty awesome and, I'm sure, extremely well researched. The characters themselves were brilliant as well and I felt really invested in them, caring what happened to each and every one of them.

A highly recommended read for lovers of both Historical and Young Adult fiction.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hit and Miss At Times, 20 Mar 2011
By 
Lovely Treez (Belfast, N Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
Jennifer Donnelly's first novel A Gathering Light , (US title A Northern Light), is one of my favourite YA/crossover novels so I was relishing the thought of getting my teeth into "Revolution" - 7 years is a long time to wait!

"Revolution" is a busy novel given that it encompasses so many ideas and themes - love, loss, family relationships, music (lots of music) and science including complex DNA testing. To complicate matters there's a dual time frame narrative with Andi, our 21st century Brooklyn girl and Alex(andrine) in 1790s Paris. Andi is a troubled teen, struggling to maintain an interest in anything including her demanding timetable at St Anselm's, an expensive private school with a cast of students who wouldn't look out of place in Gossip Girl or Beverley Hills 90210 for those old enough to remember! She and her parents are still traumatised by the death of Andi's younger brother Truman. Andi is removed to Paris by her father in an effort to encourage her to complete an outline for her senior thesis. The discovery of Alexandrine's diary, written in the 1790s, sets in motion a series of events which push present-day Andi to the brink.

Revolution is well written, it's very ambitious, the scenes from revolution-torn Paris are extremely vivid and the author has clearly done her research but...for me, it just didn't come together as a coherent story. Andi is teenage angst personified and has very few endearing qualities - yes, I know likeable characters aren't compulsory but somehow she didn't ring true for me. I loved Alexandrine and her account of the travails she and her family faced, her friendship with the young dauphin, her encounters with the intimidating Duc d'Orleans and all the sights and sounds of revolutionary Paris are there for the reader to savour. However, I found the section where Andi and Alexandrine's worlds collide a step too far on the suspension bridge of disbelief and things went progressively downhill thereafter.

Revolution will appeal to teenagers with its pop culture references but it didn't hit the spot for me as an adult reader. I also suspect that teen readers don't need plot devices and gimmicks in order to tie up narratives in neat little packages.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolution, 23 Nov 2010
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
I only recently read Jennifer Donnelly's first book, A Gathering Light so I knew she was good. However, Revolution is not just good, it is brilliant, as with her first book I think it will easily cross over into an adult audience.
The book revolves entirely around the two main female characters who are completely believable, I felt as though I knew them so well by the end of the book. Andi is from present day New York, she is extremely intelligent and musically gifted. Her life and that of her family have been torn apart by the death of her younger brother, Truman. Andi blames herself, she feels her father blames her and Andi's mother is barely holding on to life and reality. When Andi's father gets a call from her prestigious high school about Andi's slipping grades, he steps in and places his ex-wife in a psychiatric hospital and takes Andi to Paris with him so she can concentrate on her thesis which she needs to complete in order to graduate.
It is Andi's trip to Paris that introduces us to the second main character. Andi is staying with friends of her fathers and comes across an old guitar case; she discovers that she can open a secret compartment in the case with a key that once belonged to her brother. The case is from the time of the French Revolution and it contains Alexandrine's diary. She was not trying to save just any boy but the son of Louis XVI who she was the companion of. The young boy is orphaned after his parents are killed and locked in a tower with very little care shown to him. Alexandrine describes in her diary the horrors of the revolution and her struggles to free the boy who she dearly loved.
Louis-Charles was the same age as Truman when they both died, this is something that Andi cannot ignore. She becomes engrossed in Alexandrine's story just as the reader does; she is looking for answers, not only about Louis-Charles's fate but also her own as she struggles to continue on without Truman.
Jennifer Donnelly's writing completely blew me away. She describes the horrors of the French Revolution in great detail so you feel as though you are standing by watching it all happen. I have to be honest in that the French Revolution has never been something that I have been particulary interested in, but having read Revolution I know that I will look into this period of history to find out more.
As the synopsis states, these two young girls are connected by love and grief, emotions that have the same effects no matter what century they are experienced in. Both Andi and Alexandrine are carrying around the burden of guilt which has huge consequences for both of them. Obviously Alexandrine's fate cannot be changed but I kept turning the pages in the hope that Andi will find some kind of resolution.
Revolution is right at the top of the list of my favoutite books this year. The plot and characters are absorbing and the attention to historical detail is amazing. Jennifer Donnelly has written a book that children and adults will greatly enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BRILLIANT, POIGNANT AND FUNNY, 25 Nov 2012
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This review is from: Revolution (Paperback)
Absolutely brilliant! It was recommended to me by the teenage daughter of a friend who knows I love all things French Revolutionary. Surprisingly I had not heard of it, despite having read and greatly enjoyed A Gathering Light some years ago. DO NOT be put off by the Young Adult tag - I am an (oldish) adult and was completely captivated. All the teenage angst, sadness and guilt is so realistically portrayed that it transcends age and gender, so I totally empathized with Andi, the teenage protagonist. She is certainly a flawed heroine and not the most likable of characters but the deeper one gets into the book the more one realizes why she is as she is. She is not one-dimensional and that makes her interesting and real. As for the storyline and the time-slip element, well, just suspend your belief, accept The Amazing Coincidences and allow yourself to be swept away. I really did not want this book to end but the conclusion is touchingly redemptive whilst managing to avoid the cheese. It is also beautifully written - both funny, poignant, with a great narrative flow that is beautifully paced.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars DESOLATION FOR THE TEEN AUDIENCE??, 27 Sep 2012
By 
Red Rock Bookworm (St. George Utah USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Revolution (Paperback)
REVOLUTION by Jennifer Donnelly blends two storylines into a fusion of history, music, conscience and love that is engrossing and lyrical as well as educational. This is the story of two teen-aged girls born centuries apart whose lives connect in a most unusual way and throughout the many twists and turns in their dual stories, we never doubt the definite connection between Alex and Andi.

One storyline presents the reader with an up-close and personal look at the French Revolution as experienced by Alexandrine (Alex) Paradis, a teen-aged girl who aspires to a life on the stage. She is engaged as playmate/caregiver to Louis-Charles, doomed son of Marie Antoinette. As the Revolution takes its toll on the lives of the "rich and famous" Alex plays every card in the hand life has dealt her in an unselfish and valiant attempt to make the little princes final days more bearable.

In the present, the rich and gifted but desolate and self-destructive Diandra (Andi) Alpers, finds that she is flunking out of the prestigious private school she attends due to her negligence in submitting a senior thesis. Andi's desolation is due, in part, to her feelings of guilt regarding the death of her younger brother Truman. Her coping mechanisms are her music and the prescription drugs she devours like a bag of popcorn. With just weeks to produce and submit her treatise this drug dependent, suicidal girl accompanies her father to Paris, where she hopes to complete a paper confirming her theory regarding the contribution to modern music of an 18th century musician named Amade Malherbeau. As luck would have it, destiny intervenes, and her discovery of a hidden journal irrevocably sets her on a collision course with the past.

While one cannot fault Ms. Donnelly's writing style nor her ability to seduce her audience, I did have one problem with this story. REVOLUTION is being marketed as a YA novel and I felt that drugs, suicide or the love of a hot guy might be perceived by a young mind as the answer to lifes problems. That said, let me add that this is a book that will sit on your shoulder and whisper to you for sometime after reading it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Revolution: Review, 14 Jun 2012
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This review is from: Revolution (Paperback)
Revolution is a stand-alone young adult novel half set in Brooklyn, New York and half set in Paris, France both in the present day and during the late 1700s whilst the French Revolution is reaching its peak.

Revolution is a story about loss and hope at its core. At times the narrative is heart-breaking, and it is not always easy to read particularly the events occurring during the French Revolution, though some of the events set in the modern-day are not easy either. The title of the book is apt, and not only because of its ties to the French Revolution, but because of a series of events that fall-out because of the discovery of a diary.

As the book blurb states, when we first meet Andi she is broken. She's given up. Even her father taking her to Paris isn't enough to change this, and then she discovers Alexandrine's diary. Alexandrine is the most interesting character for me. Don't get me wrong, I like Andi but there's just something about Alexandrine. She is very driven, and at one both innocent and knowing. Then Alexandrine meets someone - I won't say who here, as I don't want to spoil is for anyone - and something changes. I found it interesting to read this transformation, and her bravery. I also found myself empathizing with her.

The pacing of the book was brilliantly done. I also liked the way Jennifer Donnelly wrote the scenes set in the French Revolution. It was nice to see that although this is a fiction book Donnelly has done her research well, she's even included a bibliography which is several pages long. I really enjoyed reading this. If you like books like 13 Reasons Why and historical fiction then you should definitely give this book a try.

Originally posted on TheFlutterbyRoom.com
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Revolutionarily Brilliant!, 23 July 2011
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
`Revolution' is the highly anticipated second novel by American author Jennifer Donnelly following her critically acclaimed debut `A Gathering Light.' Having read `A Gathering Light' prior to `Revolution' and absolutely adoring it, I waited eagerly for `Revolution' but I was worried it would not live up to her debut. I need not have wasted the energy, `Revolution' is as close as it gets to flawless!

We are introduced to Andi Alpers, a seriously cool teenage New Yorker who is devastated by the death of her younger brother. However, she is not only being destroyed by her grief but by her rage as well. You see, Andi is angry, angry at her mother who cannot cope with the loss of her son, angry with her father who left her and most of all angry with herself for not saving her brother. Her spiral downwards becomes complete when she is threatened with expulsion from her prestigious high school. As a last resort her father bring her Paris in the hope that she will improve. It is here she finds the diary of Alexandrine Paradis, a young girl living during the French Revolution. Andi is captivated by Alex's diary and lets just say one thing leads to another...

This book just has so much going for it and one of them is a strong cast of characters. Andi, the protagonist, is, to say the least, an unusual character. Firstly, she is not the most likeable character out there but that is okay, in fact it makes the story all the more interesting. She has issues, serious issues and she takes it out on the people around but that makes her all the more realistic, all the more interesting and certainly grabs your attention. Alex is a different character but she can be quite similar to Andi. While she is less angry than Andi, Alex has her own issues and spends the book trying to resolve them. There are some great minor characters too such as Vijay, Andi's ever loyal best friend and her father the cool, collected geneticist.

The novel flows really well and it is quite fasted paced. I did not notice the time pass when I was reading this. As usual, Donnelly's writing is beautiful and evokes a range of emotions. You can tell that she is passionate about the characters and their stories and that passion rubs off the reader. The story had a great plot, which was only complimented by terrific characters.

I loved this book and I hope you give it chance because I am sure that you will love it too! While this novel is marketed at young adults, an older audience would definitely enjoy this just as much. Do not be put off by its young adult tag! To conclude I think that `Revolution' deserves all the awards it has been bestowed and I highly recommend it. It's a fantastic read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars revolution, 6 July 2011
By 
Ali (Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
After witnessing the death of her younger brother, Truman, Andi finds herself in a broken home, feeling the blame of herself and her parents. Her Nobel-winning geneticist father, never the most attentive of parents, has left and set up home with a much younger woman, while her artist mother does nothing but paint portraits of Truman and fail to find the exact shade of blue for his eyes. Andi herself is failing in all subjects at her prestigious school apart from her music lessons, one of her few outlets. Her other outlet, sadly, is self-prescribing on pills to numb her thoughts and emotions.

It's safe to say this is a bit of an angsty read and Andi is not the most likeable of characters.

I like books where characters have flaws and aren't perfect. I don't always need to like the character I'm reading about but I like to be able to empathise and connect with them. I could do that with Andi, despite occasionally wanting to strangle her for her actions. Yes, she's a bit self-centred, she witnessed something horrible, and I can get behind that in this particular story. Andi has a passion for music and, as such, the novel is brimming with musical references, be it modern, classical or technical aspects. I loved that. It also helped that we appeared to have similar tastes in music and most of the stuff she mentioned, I recognised. That helped draw me in.

It's not just Andi that's musical. She meets a man, Virgil, in Paris who, with some friends, plays in a cafe/restaurant twice per week. He's French but his family are from Tunisia, which means he's an outsider in the city, living on the unsavoury edges of Paris where violence is common and often hits the news. I could almost hear his music when reading the lyrics to his rapping. For the most part, Virgil was a nice guy and very amiable, sort of the calm to Andi's storm. I think the story needed an average, run of the mill person to counteract Andi and Alex.

We meet Alex through her diary, which Andi discovers and reads. She lived through the French Revolution and had a role as the young prince's companion and, later, as the Green Man, the person who set multitudes of fireworks off to give the prince hope while he was in jail. Alex is the other complicated character in the book. I found her, and her life, fascinating and she was probably my favourite character.

Paris itself, especially the catacombs, almost becomes a character of its own. I enjoyed wandering the city with both Andi and Alex in their respective time periods. I have always been intrigued by the catacombs under Paris, or anywhere really, particularly the sections that are off-limits to the general public so I was glad that the descriptions were detailed and vaguely creepy as they deserved to be.

And the writing! I loved it. There are a lot of wonderful passages throughout this novel. I don't know much about the French Revolution but this did seem very well detailed and researched. It has definitely encouraged me to pick up a book on that particular subject. Alex's diary entries did seem a bit modern in tone but I just read that as Andi's interpretation and translation of the old French it was written in. It certainly didn't dull my enjoyment of the story. Donnelly deftly juggles her various plots (some of which I haven't touched on here) making them all interesting and absorbing.

What stopped it from getting five stars? Virgil had some unsavoury behaviour in this novel, particularly as he's a love interest for Andi. Between slyly manipulating her and holding her iPod hostage or grabbing her by the wrist and taking her somewhere against her will, he didn't really enamour himself to me. Virgil didn't necessarily carry out these actions in a purposefully horrible way, as Andi had almost went to the top of the Eiffel Tower to kill herself and Virgil was rightly concerned about her, but there's a whole lot of uncalled for manipulation and manhandling of young women in YA and it's really got to stop. Every time I read it, I can feel my teeth on edge at yet another girl basically being forced to do something, however small, by a boy. No. Not good.

The story lost its way a bit for around 50 or so pages in the final quarter and I wasn't entirely taken with its new direction as it just seemed out of place. It does, however, end strongly and with all of its storylines being tied up in a bow, although some bows are neater than others and not all aspects end on a positive note.

Apart from a few minor niggles, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Revolution, 14 April 2011
This review is from: Revolution (Hardcover)
The story is set both in present day Brooklyn and eigtheenth century France. There's an incredible amount of historical detail woven into the book, which serves to evoke the sights, sounds and smells of Paris. I felt like I was transported back in time to a period that's always fascinated me.

What's so clever about 'Revolution' is that one narrative and one story is contained within another. First, I was absorbed by the story of Andi, an American teenager whose coping with the traumatic aftermath of her brother Truman's accidental death. This event is ripping Andi apart as she blames herself for his death and can no longer face up to life anymore. The only solace she finds is in her music. When her father takes her to Paris, she discovers the diary of a young French girl, Alexandrine, who lived during the time of the French Revolution. As Andi is sucked into Alex's story, so I was drawn into reading about Andi discovering Alex's secrets and the events of her life. The two narratives are knit together seamlessly and just as Andi is desperate to read Alex's diary - a few more entries each night, I too was desperate to read on and on. Trust me, once you've picked this up, you won't want to put it down.

The story delivers a real emotional punch and some of the incidents narrated in the book are so breathtakingly sad that I really felt myself sympathising with the characters. I don't think I was quite prepared for how difficult it was going to be to read about some of the things they had to go through.

I absolutely loved the richness of detail that went into creating Alex's world. The history of France and Marie Antoinette has always interested me and so I enjoyed finding out about her and her family. I certainly learned a lot of things that I wasn't aware of before.

The only bit of the book that didn't work quite so well for me was sequence near the end. I don't want to say too much about it because it will spoil it for people who haven't yet read 'Revolution', but although it worked well as a device to bring the story neatly together and wrap up all the loose ends, I'm not sure if it was entirely in keeping with the rest of the book. I think it might have worked more effectively without it.

Regardless of that, 'Revolution' is a superb book that will whisk you back in time and make you both smile and cry as you unravel the events of both Alex and Andi's stories.
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Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly (Paperback - 3 Oct 2011)
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