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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny, fast-paced and original
An absolute joy of a book - very cleverly structured, beautifully written, and finding a neat balance between the entirely plausible and jaw-dropping absurd. BabyBarista will ring all too familiar bells for those who've been there and done all that, and gives the rest of us a fascinating glimpse inside the archaic (and astonishing) world of the English Bar. A classic...
Published on 11 Aug. 2009 by Eugenie Verney

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, but the Kindle version needs fixing for more stars.
This is funny, and I enjoyed it a lot; however, this is a review for potential Kindle downloaders. The Kindle version has many editing errors, for example, there are missing spaces after many full stops and commas. There are also some strange sentence and paragraph wrappings, with sentences broken between lines. There are also a few spelling errors. It didn't...
Published on 14 Jan. 2011 by IoBB


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny, fast-paced and original, 11 Aug. 2009
By 
Eugenie Verney (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
An absolute joy of a book - very cleverly structured, beautifully written, and finding a neat balance between the entirely plausible and jaw-dropping absurd. BabyBarista will ring all too familiar bells for those who've been there and done all that, and gives the rest of us a fascinating glimpse inside the archaic (and astonishing) world of the English Bar. A classic page-turner that you really don't want to end, with an above-average quota of LOL moments.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A first-rate read, 13 Sept. 2009
Machiavelli didn't write about trainee barristers, but if he had done so he may well have come up with BabyBarista - the narrator of this excellent book, and one of four pupils fighting for a single tenancy at a legal chambers. Seeking to impress the established tenants whilst attempting to facilitate the downfall of his competitors, BabyB resorts to increasingly underhand tactics to secure the place; usually with unexpected and hilarious results.

As with all good books the action revolves around some carefully crafted (and crafty) characters, most of whom are referred to by their `blog' titles throughout - a modern and very pleasing touch. Tim Kevan has drawn on his own experience as a barrister to bring us into a rarefied legal world in a style that is both entertaining and illuminating. If we believe that barristers are the very epitome of probity, then we evidently do so at our peril.

BabyBarista and the Art of War is a well-written, well-paced, very funny page-turner and one of the most enjoyable books I have read for a long time. I look forward to following more adventures of this fascinating character.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truth or Fiction?, 1 Sept. 2009
By 
CS "Colette" (Cheshire, England) - See all my reviews
As a lawyer it is always dangerous reading books from fellow lawyers-for fear of disappointment. However on this occassion there was not even a semblance of disappointment. From start to finish you find yourself wondering if you are reading a Biography or a fiction novel. Anyone who has any involvement with the Law, and indeed many who haven't, will be able to identify with some of the main protagonists,and indeed may even be able to recognise themselves depicted in the prose-notwithstanding the Author's disclaimer at the outset!! No doubt Mr Kevan fears the potential law-suits that could follow. The twist in the final chapter is the icing on the cake in what is a thoroughly entertaining read, at all levels, from start to finish. I defy anyone not to enjoy this extremely well written, intelligent novel. It has left me two things to do:
1. Purchase Mr Kevan's other tome-"Why Lawyers Should Surf" and
2. Use the book as a stocking filler for all of my other friends.

NOTE TO SELF; Order half a dozen copies of BabyB before December 25th!!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Absolute Delight, 10 Sept. 2009
By 
L. Elliott (England) - See all my reviews
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This is a wonderful, pacy, read: the characters are perfectly drawn, fabulously funny and Kevan sheds light on a world that no television drama would or could ever dare to expose. Written with obvious authority, this is a laugh-out-loud legal comedy that exposes the idiosyncrasies of the modern Bar. In particular I loved BabyBarista's attempts to find a one-size-fits-all winning formula for success in court - blindly interpreting the styles of other more senior advocates - so true!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What are lawyers really like?, 25 Aug. 2009
By 
Michael Scutt "Jobsworth" (London) - See all my reviews
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Now, if this doesn't provoke a whole heap of comments, no doubt mainly derogatory, nothing will. This being the silly season it seems like an ideal time to ask the question. And I'm not going to tell you the answer. Instead I suggest you read Tim Kevan's new book "Baby Barista and the Art of War", just published by Bloomsbury and which is based on his blog in The Times. Tim is also a barrister, albeit he is currently taking a break from practising in favour of surfing in Devon and walking his dog.

It's a thoroughly amusing read and should be required reading for anyone contemplating a career at the Bar (or as a solicitor, we don't come out too well either). It's the story of a "Pupil" (newly-qualified) barrister training in Chambers trying to outwit and outmanoeuvre the three other pupils in the hunt for the holy grail at the Bar; a tenancy in Chambers. The characters are all vividly drawn and credible; the situations the characters find themselves in all give a real flavour of litigation from the side of the practitioner. There's plenty to amuse both lawyers and non-lawyers alike.

It's not just a comedy though. He also touches on big issues such as the independence of the Bar which will become much more of a live issue now that solicitors and barristers can go into partnership together since the introduction of Legal Disciplinary Partnerships last April. For instance,

"For all their supposed independence, most barristers seem to live in a state of complete paranoia and spend so much time kowtowing to solicitors that their independence is worth even less than their pride"

You'll also read the best explanation of why you shouldn't sign up for a no win no fee agreement to fund your case, but instead get legal expense insurance in advance so that the lawyers don't start worrying about how they are going to get paid. No win no fee agreements do create a conflict of interest between lawyer and client and the question of how they (we) get paid becomes "a big fat ugly screaming beast jumping up and down on their head". Too true.

It's a good holiday read

Michael Scutt
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolutely smashing and absorbing read...., 31 Aug. 2009
By 
Lee Mcilwaine - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Its rare a book exceeds the "hype" of the reviews upon its cover. This one in my opinion does by a mile.

In style its a cross between "Rumploe" infused I thought with shades of "it should not happen to a vet". The book takes you into the murky machievellian world of the pupil barrister and is set in the context of the "dog eat dog" world of unnatural selection to the holy grail of a full time place in a set of barristers chambers.

The author is a well regarded Barrister in his own right and his skill in writing is very evident. The characters are sharply defined , the plot swift and precise . Where the book to my mind really excelled was in depicting the relationships between Solicitors and Barristers and had some smashing laugh out loud moments where the exchange between the Barristers and Judges was depicted.

The book was addictive. Once started I did not want to put it down and that for me is rare. I can see this story as a television series and I hope the author reads this post and gets another book out soon because Rumpoles author is so sadly no longer with us but Rumpoles successor has I think secured his place in Chambers and I predict a good career ahead.....

Buy this book its worth EVERY penny.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious diary of a young barrister, 31 Aug. 2009
By 
R. M. Nash (Taunton, Somerset, UK) - See all my reviews
This book makes you laugh out loud and then worry that life in chambers and the courts may really be like this.
Given a copy of " The Art of War" on g
his first day BabyBarista takes its lessons to heart trying to outwit his rivals for a place in chambers.
A great cast of characters and wonderful descrptions of the legal world. The worrying thing is it rings very true!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable, but the Kindle version needs fixing for more stars., 14 Jan. 2011
This review is from: Law and Disorder: Confessions of a Pupil Barrister (Paperback)
This is funny, and I enjoyed it a lot; however, this is a review for potential Kindle downloaders. The Kindle version has many editing errors, for example, there are missing spaces after many full stops and commas. There are also some strange sentence and paragraph wrappings, with sentences broken between lines. There are also a few spelling errors. It didn't completely stop my enjoyment of the book, but it became annoying - especially for a Kindle book which cost so much, so I do not feel the KIndle version is good value.

If the issues were fixed, I'd give it 4 stars
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4.0 out of 5 stars Cuckoo in chambers, 6 Oct. 2012
By 
T. Vicary "Tim Vicary" (York, England) - See all my reviews
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This is a lively, amusing, funny, cynical, compelling fiction about the life of a pupil barrister - Babybarista - in a set of chambers in London. It's also, in its way, quite horrifying: if only half of the stories in this book are true, then the public's view of the law courts as a fishtank full of hungry sharks is totally accurate.

One major problem -and the premise for this book - is the system still practiced in many chambers of accepting four or more newly qualified `baby barristers' for a year's pupillage, when it is known from the outset that there will be a tenancy available for only one. To an outsider, or parent of a barrister - like me - this seems immoral; to Mr Kevan, who survived it, it provides the setting for an orgy of black comedy. `Life is war' his pupil master says; and from day one, the young barristers learn this lesson. Like baby birds, they are in a nest where only one can survive; the cuckoo kills the rest.
The justification for this system, one barrister explains, is that the lawcourts themselves are a theatre of conflict, where backstabbing, deception, and dirty tricks abound. To survive in these courts, and (occasionally) defend your clients, a barrister needs to have learned these lessons early, in the cut-throat battle for tenancy.

I read this book shortly after reading The Homicide Chronicle: Defending the Citizen Accused, a US defense attorney (now a judge) who is so concerned with justice that he claims he would never defend anyone if he did not actually believe in his client's innocence. There could be no greater contrast between that book and the world Tim Kevan portrays, where -just as in several John Grisham stories - the vital and over-riding concern of almost all the barristers is quite simple: their fees.

Ouch. So what is the truth? Halfway between the two, I would hope. But Mr Kevan's view is very persuasive. This is a really enjoyable book: amusing, entertaining, witty, very easy to read. I will definitely read the next.

Unfortunately, the author has been seriously let down by his publisher, Bloomsbury. I read this book on kindle, and the editing and formatting of the ebook are truly awful; there are errors all over the place. A reputable publisher like Bloomsbury should do much, much better. Perhaps the paperback is edited properly: I hope so for the author's sake. He writes well; his editors should do their job too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars BabyB 2 coming to you soon., 27 Aug. 2009
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BabyBarista review for amazon.co.uk

You have to read this :-) It's a good insight into the British legal system, and it's a great documentation of how various types of humans with different styles have success at the same job, while still managing to play it their own way.

I know this guy. The writer. It would be terrible for me if his book were bad. Thankfully it is not. Actually, I couldn't put it down :-) Sleep and work were a necessary but annoying interruption between reading, and I got into the book's BabyBarista character and his exploits quickly. He shows a nice progression of skills he needs to get over a work obstacle and on to the next, and I found myself more than once REALLY wanting to turn to the end of the book to see if he got the girl and/or the job. (I remember getting a similar excitement when reading The Secret Diary Of Adrian Mole, but in that book the feeling was more to see if the poor love would be alright.)

The characters BabyBarista meets in his year of work feel real, genuine and believable. Ahhhh. Which brings me to a point. This book is either a work of fact, or a work of fiction. If it is fact then BabyBarista should be applying for work in the Intelligence Services of MI6, the CIA or similar :-) I think it is more likely it is a work of fiction. I consider the author sitting at home each night, finally able to relax a little, as he runs through in his mind the events of the day, letting himself imagine what COULD have happened if James Bond had lived the same day through :-)

I read the book by chapters, as they are not too long, and it is written in a diary style so if you only have a minute each time you pick it up then that is catered for too.

The author signed my copy of the book at one of the book signings. I said to write from the heart, and when I read his comment it makes me smile every time. So he really IS a good writer :-)

One more thing. If you did read this book please do write a review. It will be very appreciated.
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Law and Disorder: Confessions of a Pupil Barrister
Law and Disorder: Confessions of a Pupil Barrister by Tim Kevan (Paperback - 2 Aug. 2010)
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