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48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Goldfinch
I discovered Donna Tartt through The Secret History and, although I enjoyed The Little Friend, I didn't feel it was in the same league as her debut. So, I approached this novel with some trepidation but, I am delighted to say, it was unnecessary. This is a masterpiece - in fact, it may well end up considered her greatest work. A huge, sweeping novel, which takes you on a...
Published 8 months ago by S Riaz

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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Repetitive and uninspiring!
I really enjoyed this book at the start, couldn't put it down. However, somewhere along the way, about the time the main character moved to Las Vegas I became disheartened with the story, a bit long winded, repetitive and drawn out. By page 600 I was over it but battled on until the end and was also disappointed with that. Perhaps I am not into art enough for this book...
Published 1 month ago by Hellerina


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48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Goldfinch, 13 Dec 2013
By 
S Riaz "S Riaz" (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
I discovered Donna Tartt through The Secret History and, although I enjoyed The Little Friend, I didn't feel it was in the same league as her debut. So, I approached this novel with some trepidation but, I am delighted to say, it was unnecessary. This is a masterpiece - in fact, it may well end up considered her greatest work. A huge, sweeping novel, which takes you on a roller coaster ride, doesn't let up for a minute, and has a breathtaking ending.

Theo Decker is a young boy when we meet him, who lives with his mother in an apartment block in New York. His father has left and his greatest worry at that point is that he has been suspended from school. On his way to a meeting with his headteacher, Theo and his mother visit an art gallery and his life changes forever. A bomb explodes and Theo is unable to find his mother. Instead, he finds an injured, elderly man, who he had seen before wandering the gallery with a young girl. Before dying, the man gives Theo a ring and he also takes a painting - The Goldfinch, a masterpiece painted in the 1600's. That whole scene is like a dreamscape, as Theo emerges onto the street almost unnoticed and returns home. However, he cannot remain alone forever and, before long, social workers emerge on the scene. From that moment on, Theo is shuttled from place to place. He spends time at the home of a school friend, visits the antique shop of the man he saw in the gallery and finds his business partner, James Hobart 'Hobie' and meets the girl, Pippa, is reclaimed by his estranged father, befriends another lost soul, Boris, at his new home in LA, before returning to New York. Throughout his travels, Theo is neglected, often lonely, always feels an outsider and, although he fears discovery, clings to the painting that he took that day. It is meaningless to say more - this is a huge book and you will need to give it your time and attention, but it will reward you amply. A stunning achievement and possibly the best book of the year.
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476 of 532 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical, 24 Oct 2013
This review is from: The Goldfinch (Hardcover)
This is a tough book to review without gushing and without giving away too much of the story. I am going to gush, because in this instance I can't help it, but I'm going to try to avoid giving away too much of the story, because many of the great delights of The Goldfinch come from that rare experience of reading for pleasure: turning the pages to see what happens next, and losing yourself in this world of someone's creation. So try to know as little about this book as you can before you start to read it. The Goldfinch is a novel of many wonderful surprises, whether it's the introduction of both major or minor characters, or plot twists I really never expected, or unexpected shifts of scenery. (And whoa! One change in location in particular is a masterclass in dramatic handling, artfully rendered and most purposefully done.)

But gush isn't enough, so let me just say this: if you're a fan of Harry Potter or Pinocchio or The Wizard of Oz, if you've enjoyed Truman Capote, Jack Kerouac or J.D. Salinger, or Huckleberry Finn or Walt Whitman, if you've had fun with Breaking Bad or Six Feet Under, if you can imagine Dickensian epics retold for the era of global capital and sprinkled with a dose of Buddhist sentiment, if you love the old masters of Dutch painting, if you love dogs, if you love little birds, if you've loved either of Donna Tartt's other novels, if you live for great storytelling, if you think that art can change the world and that we can love unquestioningly (deep breath) ... if any of the above apply to you in any way, there is a good chance that you might like or even (like me) love this book and be totally wrapped in its embrace.

The ending of the book just soars. It moved me to tears.

The Goldfinch is epic, and it's ambitious. The many fantastic reviews are warranted. It takes risks, and they worked magically for me. Books as pleasurable as this are rare events. Yes, I'm gushing.
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74 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliance and paradox, 13 April 2014
This review is from: The Goldfinch (Paperback)
Rarely these days does one find a writer brave enough to confront so unflinchingly the desperateness of the human condition in the 21st century. But Donna Tartt is such a writer and it is this which raises her novel The Goldfinch to the highest level of art. The protagonist Theo Decker has been compared to Pip in Great Expectations but the reality is that this is a far darker tale than Dickens' novel.

Dickens shines a light on the bleakness and wickedness at the heart of 19th century British industrial society but in his novels there is always the conviction that good and right will triumph in the end. This was still a Christian world he was writing about after all and his Victorian audience expected a happy ending even if the reality did not quite live up to it.

But the amoral world Theo Decker inhabits following the death of his mother in a terrorist attack in New York, is a world of unrelieved bleakness where there are no certainties any more. Once on the road to corruption through drugs, deception, stealing and dishonesty there is no way back. Without a family to offer some sort of protection or relief, Theo has absolutely no hope in a society which is fundamentally corrupt at every level.

From the well observed social workers whose job is to process Theo through the care system, to the wealthy Barbour family with their coolly efficient lifestyle, concealing fundamental psychological flaws, Donna Tartt paints a picture of quiet desperation where there is no longer any possibility of finding anything that resembles home ever again. It's a picture of alienation and as such utterly convincing. Only with Hobie the antique restorer and Welty's niece Pippa does Theo find a temporary bolt hole where he can genuinely relax.

But the narrative takes on a darker aspect altogether when Theo's unreliable alcoholic father turns up finally with his new girlfriend Xandra and they move to the outskirts of Las Vegas to a life of gambling, baccarat, drinking and cocaine. It's here that Theo meets Boris, a dissolute but entertaining Ukrainian with a similarly unreliable and violent father, who has lived in Australia. Together they dabble in everything, Vodka, beer, drunken swimming, shoplifting, drugs and sex.

There is a point in this novel when you think, so.. is this simply a rites of passage novel, the move from childhood to adulthood by way of drugs and alienation? Is Theo finally bound to settle for the inevitable dull mediocre future of adult life with its nine to five cycle, chained to the capitalist machine for a lifetime? I mean, what else can there be now? What can there be after you've done everything else, except to end up as a carbon copy of your hopeless father?

But here's the surprise. No. No. That's not it. It's worse. So bad in fact that ultimately there seems to be no way back. Even Theo sees this in the end.

But then just to confound the reader even more, there's a twist. Just when you believe things can't possibly get any worse, the enigma of The Goldfinch,the painting by Fabritius which Theo stole from the museum, works its own magic. The paradox is that hope springs out of paradox. This is the nature of art and love and all greatness.

Donna Tartt writes with the cool eye of the observer standing just far enough away to see clearly. But I defy you not to be moved by The Goldfinch and its finally hopeful message.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A return to form, 4 Aug 2014
By 
AT Clarke - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
The Secret History is one of my favourite books, and like much of Donna Tart's fan-base I was disappointed with The Little Friend.

The Goldfinch however is a return to form.

I don't know whether Donna Tart was searching for the formula that made The Secret History such a success, but there are similarities between the two books. The Secret History had a sense of class isolation, an outsider looking in on a world he didn't belong to - and there are elements of that theme in the new book.

The book is laced with questions about the human condition as lead character struggles to overcome a major tragedy in his childhood. I thought the character development was excellent - the book spans over a decade - and you get a great feel for the person he has become and the choices he has made.

Overall I found this book to be truly excellent, the characters and story stayed with me for weeks after finishing.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Repetitive and uninspiring!, 3 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
I really enjoyed this book at the start, couldn't put it down. However, somewhere along the way, about the time the main character moved to Las Vegas I became disheartened with the story, a bit long winded, repetitive and drawn out. By page 600 I was over it but battled on until the end and was also disappointed with that. Perhaps I am not into art enough for this book but all in all this book was not for me!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A promising start but ultimately a broken promise!, 24 Aug 2014
This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
The structure and pace of the novel is very uneven making it appear as though it has been written at widely different times and under differing circumstances. Hardly surprising given a decade long gestation.
At the start of the novel the portrayal of the main character, the description of the terrorist explosion which kills his mother, and his feelings at his loss are accurate, perceptive and well written. There are other short sections where the author achieves a similar level of understanding and description. Unfortunately however most of the rest of the novel is overshadowed by endless and pointless descriptions, an immature desire to show-off her knowledge / research of drug culture, the antiques "trade" etc. all in a convoluted style of writing.
The thin storyline is one of bleak self-destructiveness and misery with few characters, most of whom are cyphers, having any redeeming features. Most appear to have no moral compass and it is difficult to have any sympathy for them as they make little or no effort to rectify this deficiency.
It is yet another book that I failed to finish; after some 600 pages the tedium simply became too much and it is difficult to believe that anything much would change in the last quarter of the novel.
Overall the book is self-indulgent, repetitive and pretentious. It is way too long and should have been the severely edited before publication. Final verdict - poor and hardly worth the effort.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A contemplative read, 21 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
I have read the authors two previous books and am a fan of her writing, but Don,t really know how to correctly describe this book. There is a crime but it's more than your usual crime fiction.The book is about a boy who is visiting an art gallery with his mother when it is hit by an explosion ( a bomb?). Theo Decker survives but his mother is killed. While Theo is searching for his mother he sees an old man who is injured and dying and recognises him as the man he has seen earlier with a red headed girl looking at the artworks. Theo tries to help the old man who tells him to go, and to take the famous picture of the Goldfinch which his mother loved, with him. The story then takes you through Theo' s life after he leaves with the painting and into adulthood, it follows his relationships , the unrequited love he has for pippa the unsettled life he lives as a teenager with his alcoholic father in Vegas and the friendships he has with Boris, and Hobie who becomes the father figure Theo needs. The story is much more than that and takes you on a journey through the world of art and antiques, but is primarily about loss. The painting of the Goldfinch is a central character and what happens to it once Theo steals it takes many twists and turns. Not exactly a page turner, but interesting, enjoyable and quite philosophical and thought provoking at the end. Give it a go, and then read the other two books .
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Hard work and disappointing, 18 July 2014
This review is from: The Goldfinch (Hardcover)
Too many descriptive paragraphs that confuse the reader. The dialogue in parts is so bad it has to be re read to be understood, the young boys in the early part of the book speak to each other in a language which is totally out of place in the 21st century. A strange mixture of children's and adult literature. Iife is too short to read 800 pages of boring, heavy handed writing such as this, I gave up after 200 deciding I didn't care what happened to the main character.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book of two halves, 29 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
I finally finished this novel a few days ago. I recollect the final 10% (I read it on my Kindle) being tedious and repetitive and I was skim reading it. Ultimately the biggest problem with this epic novel is that not nearly enough happens to justify the 700 - 800 pages. Yes, Donna Tartt can write and sometimes she has a way of writing that's so powerful and heartfelt, it feels like a punch in the guts. However hidden amongst the gems is an awful lot of meandering. Just because every Donna Tartt novel carries a massive weight of expectations doesn't mean that she shouldn't have an editor telling her less is more. I really enjoyed my time with Theo, the main character, until he becomes an adult and then he became this passive rather moody soul who I slowly grew tired off. There's a great novel in here somewhere, in particular dealing with themes like loss and love and death but somewhere, it all just gets lost. The final third, which will not spoil anything for you if I tell you that it's set in Amsterdam, (you learn this in the first few pages) is a massive let down, almost like the Hollywood Studios have dictated the direction the story should go. This is a book that will stay with you but sadly, not for all the right reasons.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally absorbing, 29 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Goldfinch (Kindle Edition)
Just lost three days of my life and gained a whole new perspective on the World... I feel like I've lived in another realm. Donna Tartt... Thank you.
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The Goldfinch
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (Hardcover - 22 Oct 2013)
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