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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
The Radiophonic Workshop was always an essential ingredient in the initial brilliance of Doctor Who. Whether or not you're a dedicated Whovian, these are still really interesting pieces of sonic otherworldliness. A straight re-release of a 1978 LP, these are predominantly 1970s sound effects, and although sound of the incidental music at that time was just beginning to veer into novelty synthesizer cringeyness, the sound effects remained raw, experimental and really interesting.

The effects are all in their original mono, but they've been cleaned up as necessary to sound absolutely perfect and practically brand new. As it's a faithful re-issue of an LP, you only get just over half an hour's worth of sound.

Side one (the first 8 tracks) is predominantly background atmospheres ('atmos')- most are actually quite sedate and some even end up feeling like ambient meditation noises, but some, like "the Dalek control room" (the sound effect that continued to be used so brilliantly in the series from 2005 onwards), are familiarly sinister and tension-inducing. By weeding a couple of the more dangerous-sounding atmospheres out, I've got myself a playlist to help get our baby daughter to go to sleep- that's a bonus!

Side two (the other 22 tracks) is a little more atmos but also a range of spot effects- some alarms sounding, the sonic screwdriver (less squeaky than you may remember it), a few squeaks from the TARDIS, and a range of alien weapons being fired- not least the Dalek gun. These are more of a curiosity than a proper sit-down listening experience but they're still a joy. Some of the noises may sound cliché now (not all of them), but that's generally because the Radiophonic Workshop did them first, and everybody else copied it!

If you want to use Doctor Who noises for (for example) your ringtone or your alarm sound or your home movie (well who knows) then this is NOT the complete set of sound effects you'll be after. However, if you've downloaded the Doctor Who Adventure Games from the web site and you're willing to poke around a little with converting OGG files, then you'll find that between this excellent disc and the files already hidden on your PC, then you'll have a very thorough and generally outstanding Who sound effect library.

The inclusion of CD Text (so if your CD player is compatible, it will display the name of the track as it's being played, without having to look it up on the internet) is a small plus but a real sign that a bit of care has been taken on this release.

If you're a Who fan, or even just a fan of electronic sonic wizardry and ambience, then this is an essential and bargain addition to your collection.
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50 of 55 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 1 February 2012
Like the circles of Hell in Dante's 'Inferno', there are many layers of Doctor Who fandom.

The first level is made up of fans who try not to miss the new episodes when they're broadcast and also own a few DVDs.

In the second level, the Who fans owns ALL of the DVDs and will make an effort to visit any exhibitions.

In the third level, the Who fan owns all of the DVDs, plus a few audio recordings of the missing episodes. They may also attend the odd convention too.

To enter the mystical fourth level, the Who fan leaves the existing reality behind and enters an e-space alternate universe of new audio adventures and books that fill the gaps between the known adventures.

Next comes the fifth level: videos featuring Doctor Who actors that aren't actually Who adventures and books with no actual appearance from Doctor Who.

If a Doctor Who fan is dedicated enough to pass through the fifth level, starved of any real Who-related material, they are then allowed to reach the final level, the ultimate challenge, where they sit alone in a room listening to noises.

This record is a Proustian treat for Doctor Who fans who watched it in the 1970s, or for those who have caught up with the Pertwee and Baker mid-70s adventures on DVD, giving listeners the opportunity to enjoy classics like 'Exxilon Control Room' without any annoying interruptions from the actors. You can, of course, also use them as a background to any homemade audio or video adventures.

One word of warning - whilst I welcome the opportunity to celebrate the mastery of Dick Mills and his colleagues at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, whenever I watch a Doctor Who DVD adventure from the mid-1970s, I keep getting distracted by the sound effects, thinking: "Side Two, Track Four" at key moments in the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I've got this on LP somewhere. This is a nice to have on vinyl look CD. They are mostly sound effects from the Tom Baker era 74/78. But there is a few from Jon Pertwee's final season too. Sound effects albums are not something you listen to on a regular basis unless you're an oddball. But for this price it good's to have in your collection.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 14 March 2012
I know it's a generality but I'll be safe ground if I say, "DOCTOR WHO fans are hoarders". Great hoarders. Of course, the more veracious (read: vocal) fans will be offended to be labelled as such and will depend a retraction; they would (high) regard themselves as `collectors'.

Certainly, there's a fine line between hoarding and collecting, and over the years I have been guilty of both, becoming fanatical about to vehemently seeking out the minutiae, no matter how obscure, that features the DOCTOR WHO brand. I realised I had a problem when discovering an `ice-lolly' wrapper from 1982. What was I thinking; where was the value in this? Collecting `archive material' or hoarding `tut' as THE APPRENTICE's Lord Sugar was remark.

However, there is merchandise that no matter how obscure and wholly useless in the real world that I am relieved to have `hoarded'. It serves not purpose and has been unceremoniously stored amid similar formats for decades.

The LP (`long playing' vinyl record), DOCTOR WHO - SOUND EFFECTS is it but why am I still retaining it? I don't even have a `record player' anymore, and haven't since the turn of the century.

It comes from a time (1978) when DOCTOR WHO merchandise had almost vanished from the high street, and, in the period before `off-air video recording machines' (VHS Recorders), the LP allowed fans to re-immerse themselves into the time:space vortex in the comfort of their bedrooms, imagining trips to alien landscapes and operating technology to disintegrate an oncoming threat. It enhanced imagination in playing within the DOCTOR WHO universe in a way that no modern day wii device or hand-held DS module could ever do.

In 2012, AUDIOGO's aural time machine takes us back to that bygone age with the re-issue of the LP. Digitally remastered (though I fondly regret that the Dalek's control room track is not subjected to a `skip' due to a minor vinyl scratch) by Mark Ayres (I assume as the sleeve notes are not specific), DOCTOR WHO - SOUND EFFECTS is as genius as the previous `vintage re-issue', DOCTOR WHO - GENESIS OF THE DALEKS whether you are long-time viewer or a post-2005 newcomer.

The single-disc release includes 30-tracks that span the final season of Jon Pertwee to Tom Baker's 1978, DOCTOR WHO - INVASION OF TIME, delivering a mix of background atmospherics (from the interior of the Zygon spacecraft to the sandminer relentlessly trundling across a wind-blasted landscape) and technology sound (from DOCTOR WHO - THE FACE OF EVIL Tesh firearms to dalek weaponry to the iconic - and never beaten - Fourth Doctor's sonic screwdriver).

However, it is testament to sound effects `magicians' from the BBC RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP, Dick Mills and Brian Hodgson, that one aural creation is authentic and timeless, and, as such, has even been adopted by the NEW SERIES; the regular electronic ominous, low-rumbling (heart)beat of a dalek spacecraft interior. It's almost music. It's beautiful in a macabre way.

Equally disturbing is the hatching tanks within which the Skaro genetically-modified mutants "squelch and squeal in their tanks".

There is something innocent the sound of the TARDIS interior as it gently breathes and exfoliates through the turbulence of the vortex. Think of it as sucking a Werther's butter candy whilst perched on your Dad's knee at the age of five. Comforting, familiar and womb-like - the TARDIS. Presented here in a crystal-clear, crisp digital format without the interference generated as metal scrapes across the plastic of the original release. Glorious.

Sadly, DOCTOR WHO - SOUND EFFECTS may be too arcane or facile for some NEW SERIES viewers to comprehend but it has to be understood that without the expertise and natural creativity (using very the barest of resources available at the time) of sound designers that DOCTOR WHO would a one-dimensional television series. Sound effects are as important as the incidental music and the actor's dialogue.

Certainly, in isolation, listening to a series of sound effects may be considered to be odd but, here, we can indulge in unadulterated audio heritage that defines a piece of television history.

DOCTOR WHO - SOUND EFFECTS' importance resonates as significantly as a Yale key scarifying a taut piano wire. A singularly simple album but essential.
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on 7 February 2012
Please note this CD does not feature the classic "Vworp Vworp" " or TARDIS Materialization" sound effect.

I was really surprised that this effect was not featured - but I really should have done my homework before buying.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 4 February 2012
Originally issued in the late 1970s as part of an extensive collection of LPs featuring selections from the BBC sound effects library, 'Doctor Who Sound Effects' has now been re-released as part of the Vintage Beeb series. As with others in the series, the CD (in a standard jewel case) features a booklet reproducing the original front and rear sleeve artwork, and the disc itself is designed to give the appearance of the original record as well. Interestingly - and presumably for reasons linked to the way in which these effects were originally archived - various tracks are listed with reference to earlier versions of their respective story titles, so you can now thrill to the sounds of such forgotten tales as 'Dr Who and the Exillons', 'The Desructors' and 'The Enemy Within'. As with all the Vintage Beeb titles, the retro packaging is nice, particularly for a budget range where more elaborate replica sleeves etc may not be commercially viable.

Moving on to the contents, the 30 tracks on the disc hail mainly from the 1970s, and consist of atmospheres and special sounds created for the series by the legendary BBC Radiophonic Workshop. The first half (Side A of the original LP) is weighted more towards the atmospheric effects, which include the famous pulsating Dalek control room noise which haunted young viewers back in the day, and the ambient sounds of the Exillon City and Metebelis III among others. The second half veers more in the direction of shorter effects, including various alien gun blasts (some of which immediately evoke memories of the stories in which they originally appear) and the sounds of the Doctor's TARDIS and Sonic Screwdriver. Well, some of them. Disappointingly, the original release didn't feature the famous wheezing, groaning (or Vworp Vworp, if you prefer) that accompanies the TARDIS' taking off and landing, and so this is a notable omission from the disc. Given that this disc is essentially an exercise in nostalgia, I can entirely understand why it's been decided not to interfere with the contents of the album. It's still a little disappointing, though.

Ultimately, this is a great bit of nostalgia for fans who owned the LP the first time round. Whether it'll have much appeal beyond that is debatable. It's difficult to think of a situation where you'll get the urge to sit down and listen to 'Gallifreyan Staser (3 Blasts)' or 'Sutekh Time Tunnel', and unless you have a desire to use the sounds for some purpose or other, it may not be worth bothering. But at this price point, it's worth a shot. 3 blasts, of course.
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on 19 October 2014
Nice selection of sounds indeed. I was hoping more for tardis beeps and buttons but the atmospheric sounds are rather neat in themselves. One for theach collectors I think
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on 21 December 2013
Only for the Dr Who anorac.

Very clever stuff back in the day for the BBC radiophonic workshop. How the effects have changed over theyears to technology
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A strange-but-superb experience. My favourite sound effect on this is the sound of the Dalek Hatching Tanks from 'Genesis of the Daleks', but I love it all.
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...well, what do you expect from Aunty Beeb! LoL! Not exactly like the original vinyl disc but just as I wished it to be. Buy and enjoy. Dan x
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