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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly Audiobook Adaption Of A Fifth Doctor Classic
Doctor Who - Earthshock.

CD Info.
4xCD
Running time 4 hours & 45 minutes

What's Up Doc.
The fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan & Adric encounters a group of palaeontologists have been savagely attacked while carrying out a study of fossilised dinosaur remains in an underground cave system on twenty-fifth century Earth.

A party of...
Published 6 months ago by Timelord-007

versus
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cybervoices
Why did they not ask David Banks, who played the cyberleader on TV from 82-88 including Earthshock, to do the cyber voices. Why use this Nicholas Briggs?
Published on 8 April 2012 by DH


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly Audiobook Adaption Of A Fifth Doctor Classic, 8 Sept. 2014
By 
Timelord-007 (The Eccentric Wanderer) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Doctor Who - Earthshock.

CD Info.
4xCD
Running time 4 hours & 45 minutes

What's Up Doc.
The fifth Doctor, Nyssa, Tegan & Adric encounters a group of palaeontologists have been savagely attacked while carrying out a study of fossilised dinosaur remains in an underground cave system on twenty-fifth century Earth.

A party of troopers & Professor Kyle, the only survivor of the attack, are investigating the deaths of her colleagues when they discover the Doctor & his companions at the site of the massacre.

The time-travellers are immediately suspected. In trying to establish their innocence & find out who - or what - was responsible for the killings, the Doctor is confronted by an old enemy...The Cybermen.

Timelord Thoughts.
The late Ian Marter who played Harry Sullivan a former companion adapted this serial written by script editor of the time Eric Saward to novel form which was originally published in 1983 after Earthshocks broadcast in 1982.

Fifth Doctor himself actor Peter Davison narrates this Audiobook book brilliantly adding grrat drama & sensitivity to the Doctor & depicts the various character's of the story with a great vocal range while The Cybermen are chillingly brought to life & voiced by Nicholas Briggs who voices them on both the bew series of Doctor Who & Big Finish audios as Briggs gives more of a classic interpretation which isn't quite how they sounded in 1982's serial.

The sound design, effects & music are as efficient as usual & give a atmospheric feel to the story while the two hander narrative between Davison & Briggs enhances the story & allows actor Peter Davison someone to act against.

If you seen the serial then you know how this ends hence the word shock in the title, if you haven't I recommend you purchase both this audiobook & the DVD of the story as it's one of the top 10 best Doctor Who stories ever & this a excellent quality faithful adaption on audio.

Timelord Rating.
9/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 80s Cybermen with New Series voices - A terrifying terrific 'shocking' experience!, 14 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Since 'Earthshock' was the first classic `Doctor Who' story I watched, it's fair that I should purchase the audiobook of the Target novelisation of the TV story.

`Doctor Who - Earthshock' is a brilliant novelisation of one of my favourite Who stories with the Fifth Doctor, Nyssa of Traken, Tegan and Adric and of course with the Cybermen. I read the actual novelisation of this whilst hearing the audiobook in the background. I bought the audiobook in Stratford-upon-Avon whilst purchasing the novel from Amazon. The story is read by none other than the Doctor himself - Peter Davison. There's also Nick Briggs who provides the Cybermen voices for this to, which are very convincing Cyber voices compared to the TV story.

This book was published from the Target range in 1983, a year after the TV story's initial broadcast. It was novelised from Eric Saward's TV scripts by...Ian Marter! Yes, that's right. Ian Marter wrote this novel. Do you know who Ian Marter is? He played Harry Sullivan, Doctor Who companion during Tom Baker's time. And he's done a remarkable job adapting this story into a novel that I've enjoyed reading and hearing.

Ian has written a number of Target novels based on original TV stories during the series, particularly stories from the Patrick Troughton days such as 'The Dominators' and 'The Invasion'. He also novelised a story he was in himself that became 'Doctor Who and the Sontaran Experiment'. `Earthshock' is his fifth novel for the range, and he writes splendidly adapting the story from Eric Saward's original words to an audience that would suit a more novel approach.

In terms of plot, not much has changed in the story. Although Ian has slightly amended and adjusted some certain scenes making them a work a little better compared to the TV screen. He also has provided more descriptive dialogue to the settings of the story making it far more dynamic and action-packed, especially when concerning character development and involvement.

One thing I remember from this novel is how he described the caves at the beginning, making them look from the outside like the face of a skull which was very exciting and scary to think about, and made me wonder why it couldn't look like a skull in the TV story as that would have been terrific. The deaths of Snyder and some of the other troopers are handled well by Ian Marter, giving more descriptive detail and still making the deaths as gruesome and horrifying than before when reading on page compared to what was on screen. The death of Kyle was a little disappointing, as I found in the TV story she died heroically whereas in the novel she died by accident or got callously killed by Cybermen which was rather a shame frankly.

A moment in the story is in the later half when the Doctor and Tegan are taken away by the Cyber Leader to the TARDIS on the freighter. The Doctor tries to make a break for it, and causes an `accident' in the Cyber Control room close by that reawakens the dormant Cybermen in the silos. This would help to explain why the Cybermen woke up unexpectedly in `Part Four' of the story as there seemed to be no explanation and didn't make sense as to why they were awakened.

Also the dialogue's much more sharper compared to the TV story. It sticks to same points made in the story, but when reading it I found the characters easier to enjoy with sharper dialogue compared to sometimes when the dialogue was dodgy on screen. Even the Cybermen's dialogue's improved, making them less emotional and more logical sounding like robots which I hope for but didn't transpire in the TV story.

I love how Ian's handled the regulars of the Doctor, Adric, Tegan and Nyssa. I enjoyed some of Ian's descriptions of the character especially with Nyssa's aristocratic , pretty nature and Tegan's `red hair' and bossy attitude. Even listening to their dialogue was enjoyable making them much stronger characters, especially with Nyssa when she's with Kyle or when she mourns the death of Kyle and rebukes Scott in the TARDIS.

Peter Davison reads this novelisation of the story of `Earthshock'. I have heard Peter do another one of these audiobooks, which was his first story 'Castrovalva'. He was very good reading that and he's equally good reading this getting across the characters and making them sound right as they did on TV. I like his impersonation of Tegan's Australian accent, Nyssa's calm tones and Adric's rather obnoxious attitude in mathematics that shifts to his compassionate side that we eventually saw him in before his tragic fate. His energy shines throughout reading this novelisation and I enjoyed hearing him from the audiobook with his reassurance and enthusiasm for this particular story.

Nick Briggs again provides voices for the Cybermen as he did before with another Cybermen story - 'Doctor Who and the Cybermen' (which is in fact `The Moonbase'). I didn't like the Cybermen voices in `Earthshock' and their design was pretty terrible for me. But when reading this book and hearing the audio CDs, these weren't 80s Cybermen anymore. They were new series Cybermen. They sound exactly what Nick Briggs does for them in the new series today in stories like 'Rise of the Cybermen'/'The Age of Steel'. This made me really happy, as the dialogue spoke by the Cybermen was exactly right and the way Nick says the dialogue in his new series Cyber voice was brilliant. They still say `Excellent' as they did on the TV story, but Nick doesn't make it sound emotional and silly as I felt David Banks seemed to do it when he played the Cyber Leader in the story.

I like Ian Marter's use of description for the Cybermen when going deeper into how their hydraulics and mechanical parts worked. Even with sound effects in the background in the audiobook when reading the pages, I was convinced by these Cybermen being more robotic compared to TV. I enjoyed it when a Cybermen clutched his chest unit in almost reaction of `choking' to the mention of Voga - `the planet of gold' when watching the `flashback' sequences of Doctors on their holo-screen. Ian should know about Cybermen and gold shouldn't he, since he was in 'Revenge of the Cybermen' himself. Also when people reacted to Cybermen's oily vapours when coming into close contact with them was fascinating and enjoyable to listen to and read. The scenes when the Cyber Leader and Doctor confront each other are a great improvement, and even with Nick Briggs providing the Cyber voices when hearing it was a true joy.

The final end with the death of Adric was effectively handled as it carried the same emotion and weight as it had been carried in the TV story. I still found myself emotionally drained and `shocked' when reading and hearing the end of the story, and it took me a while to get to settle down and sleep in bed when I was hearing it. Ian Marter has handled Adric's death pretty well and it's done with such a tense and heart-breaking atmosphere. Even knowing what would happen, I was still emotionally moved by it.

This is a great novelisation of a TV story. `Doctor Who - Earthshock' was brilliant to enjoy reading and listening with Peter Davison providing narration on the story and Nick Briggs doing the Cybermen. You're bounded to enjoy this, and with the great improvement of dialogue and description by Ian Marter as well as on providing new series Cyber voices, you can't go wrong. This audiobook should provide extra enjoyment and thrills to your `Earthshock' experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A memorable Story., 22 July 2012
By 
Glenn Cook (South Cave, near Hull UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Earthshock is possibly one of the most remembered stories of the Doctor Who Series for the simple reason that one of the Doctor's Assistants dies at the end.

I don't think for a moment I have written a plot spoiler for almost everyone will know the ending? It was dramatic and shocking- that doesn't happen to the Doctor's assistants does it?

Peter Davison is also one of the top of people's favourite Doctors and Cybermen are up there too with the favourite monsters.

Eric Seward was a great Doctor Who writer.
Marry that with the fact it's set in earth's Future and you have Space Freighter's in peril then you have a cracking mix of a realy good story.

So with all those in the mix I sought out this Audio Book reading by Peter Davison.

The book is actually written by the deceased Ian Marter based on Eric Seward's Serial for Dr Who. It was published in 1983 after Sewards serial shown in 1982. Even I cannot believe it is over 30 years ago since I saw it.

Davison reads the book well. When he depicts a character's voice there is a special effect that changes it so it does not detract from the story- but rather enhances the narrative.
The Cybermen too are voiced by Nicholas Briggs so this really helps dispel possible 'dryness' in the narration. - True some decry Brigg's voice as not being authentic but for me the voices are spot on in increasing my enjoyment of the books reading.

At a running time of 4 hours and 45 minutes spread over 4 CDs this is good entertaiment.

The story as I said is a cracker- well remembered and liked.
Davison depicts it well and the story rolls along at a good pace with no 'dead part; fillers.

I would have preferred an audio play version akin to the excellent Big Finish productions but this is the next big thing.
Had it been an audio play it would have got 5 stars and not the 4 I have given.

It's good but not great.

So recommended.Earthshock
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cybermen's cunning plan, 22 Jun. 2012
By 
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Review of Audio cd: (22 June 2012)

I only vaguely remembered the story of Earthshock from the tv series; only the ending is etched indelibly on my mind. It was shocking at the time; or at least I found it so. And it's still really shocking when you hear it read out loud now. I never really cared for the character of Adric much, but the whole story is really quite sad.

Peter Davison is great in this reading of Ian Marter's wonderful novelisation of this wonderful 80's story; it's lovely to hear a Doctor reading a story about the Doctor. His reading of the other character's voices is not affected in any way; it's really just a simple reading done by him in the character he played so well. The only gripe I really had was the cybermen voices - it would have been nice to have David Banks voice the cybermen in the tones that were used in the original tv story; it would have made more sense too, when Ian Marter uses the word "boomed" to describe the Cyber Leader's voice; Nicholas Briggs' rendition of the cybermen, while good, is more of a "classic" Cyberman, not the 1980's even more chilling creatures that were voiced by David Banks. Apart from that, everything was spot on - the voices, the characterisations, the sound effects.

All in all, totally recommended - a great story, well novelised, well read and wonderfully preserved for us all to listen to again and again.

Review of novelisation: (2 July 2013)

This is, as any Doctor Who fan will know, the story with the ending that just about everybody is familiar with. I won't spoil it here for anyone who doesn't know it, but it's a biggie for the Tardis crew.

This novelisation of the story of Earthshock is written by Ian Marter, who played the character of Harry Sullivan for a few stories in Tom Baker's Fourth Doctor era. He was a good writer, and has written a few Doctor Who novels, but unfortunately died very young - a sad loss.

The story involves the Fifth Doctor, Tegan, Nyssa and Adric becoming involved with an expedition who have suffered some mysterious deaths and sabotage. It doesn't take long before some old friends (!) of the Doctor's turn up, and things get really ugly from there. The story moves to a freighter waiting to return to Earth, and the Doctor attempts to sort out several threads of a great and cunning plan before it's too late for everybody.

This story was first broadcast in Season 19, in 1982, and featured Peter Davison as the Fifth Doctor. The story was, I recall a very good one - striking and stark, and quite true to the nature of those involved. The brutal nature of the story, and the shocking ending, means that it stays in your mind. This novelisation of the story is very good, and I recommend it heartily.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Return of the Cybermen, 21 Oct. 2012
By 
Mr. D. K. Smith (South Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Earthshock is an efficient adaptation by Ian Marter of Eric Saward's script, originally transmitted in 1982. Marter was responsible for penning a series of highly regarded Doctor Who novelisations, from the late 1970's until his untimely death in 1987.

Earthshock sticks quite closely to the original scripts, although Marter is more than able to add more tension and fear on the printed page.

Peter Davison gives a capable reading, and sound design and effects are as efficient as usual. The only drawback is that the Cyber voices are not the ones as used in the original TV serial.

Nicholas Briggs did offer to do Earthshock-style voices, but for some strange reason BBC policy decided that this wasn't acceptable, and the new series voices should be used instead. As the Earthshock-era Cybermen are quite verbose it doesn't really work if they don't have the "proper" voices.

It's still a decent reading though, and worth picking up.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Chilling. Truly chilling., 14 Mar. 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Doctor: "I wonder whose bloodhounds they are?"

For decades amongst the more discerning DOCTOR WHO aficionados, Ian Marter's 1983 TARGET novelisation is regarded as reverently as Rowling's initial outing for Harry Potter or as Pratchett's DISCWORLD series, and, to honest, it's easy to see why. Marter presents an astonishingly accomplished re-imagineering of Eric Saward's original four-part televised story, ushering the already substantial script & plotline toward the realm of adult science fiction horror.

In this new form, AUDIOGO has re-unearthed a true classic by any definition. Regrettably, whilst Peter Grimwade's on-screen direction was certainly adept, dutiful and thoughtful but it was flawed, however Marter's novelisation is the authentic `voice' that will reward fans for further decades.

A timeless audiobook.

The superiority of the novelisation is magnified two-fold by both Peter Davison's performance and MEON SOUND's effortless contribution of sound effects & incidental music.

Davison's performance is dramatic and sensitive simultaneously, deftly leaping from that narrator, to that of paranoid soldier, to petulant Alzarian stowaway, to a sometime patronising Time Lord, to an aging Space Freighter Captain who, in this audio version of EARTHSHOCK, does not believe that her vessel will drive from Warp drive to Acacia Avenue if she turned left at the traffic lights. It's an achievement, really, as the character list is both extensive and varied, and in the hands of another reader the delineation would be lost and uninspiring.

As I said, the success of this audio version is artistic collaboration founded on Marter's original text, and supporting Davison's presentation is an array of peerless sound effects that act in tandem with original incidental music that would not be out of place in the NEW SERIES.

Whether it's an atmospheric treatment to voices within an organic caves, occasionally dripping with ground water, giving them soft echoes as opposed to the bounced-back echoes within the hard-surfaced interior of the Freighter's cargo-hold, MEON SOUND has, once again, excelled in recreating the seemingly impossible. From the `gulp' of a soldier hydrating himself, to the lethal laser rifle blast - as it rips through human flesh, eviscerating a liver, micro-waving the heart and disassembling metres of intestine within seconds of the trigger being tensed - to the gentle womb-like hum of the TARDIS Console Room.

However, it the sound treatment of this audiobook works perfectly as it's restrained and its application judged for maximum effect. When not to use additional sound or music is just as important as to when, and here is where MEON SOUND (with the AUDIOGO Producers) understand the structure of the storytelling and the needs of the listener precisely.

More importantly MEON SOUND contributes in updating the EARTHSHOCK version of the Cybermen, banishing the sound of vacuum-formed plastic chest plates rubbing unceremoniously against nylon, silver paint-sprayed aircraft pilot overalls heard on the televised version to be replaced with a terrifying rhythmically pulsating `steam pump' joints that re-enforces the fact that the aliens are a bio-mechanical pot-pouri of spare parts & genetically-grown implants.

This is enhanced by NEW SERIES stalwart voice-artist, Nicholas Briggs' voice treatment that is an conglomeration of various incarnations delivering a tonally resonance that achieves a sinister air of superiority not witness in the CLASSIC SERIES (post-EARTHSHOCK).

Chilling. Truly chilling.

AUDIOGO's DOCTOR WHO - EARTHSHOCK continues the excellence, and excellence has become the byword for their unabridged presentations, but here more so. On reflection, remembering the more recent releases, EARTHSHOCK succeeds as it's `perfectly formed', not only because of its creative partnership but, more importantly, its overall duration; four discs for a four-part story is unalloyed, and this, if I were to give advice to AUDIOGO, should be the template for future releases.

Fans of the NEW SERIES will thoroughly enjoy DOCTOR WHO - EARTHSHOCK but, whilst they will be absorbed but it, CLASSIC SERIES fans (who originally watched the story in 1982, and had leapt out of the sofa at the end of episode one) will be equally disappointed that Ian Marter's novelisation contribution was terminated so early by an untimely death and by the fact that 1983 is nearly 30 years ago. Where has the time gone?

Oh, and after listening to disc two chapter 17 you may consider if, in 1983, Ian Marter named a modern-day electronic data storage device decades before Steve Jobs did? A phrase that leaps of the aural page!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Earth to earth, funk to funky, 11 Mar. 2012
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This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Quite a dark story, originally produced during Peter Davison's first season as The Doctor, and noted for its fairly high quota of violent death. This audio adaptation of the original 1981 serial is faithful to its source, but benefits further from a strong narration by Davison himself - all quiet authority and understated charm as with his televisual portrayal of the Time Lord. Saward's script is as bumptious as you'd expect, but there is still a good level of unspoken menace created in the early scenes. A good, solid, if unspectacular entry in the audio series.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Cybervoices, 8 April 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who: Earthshock (Audio CD)
Why did they not ask David Banks, who played the cyberleader on TV from 82-88 including Earthshock, to do the cyber voices. Why use this Nicholas Briggs?
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Doctor Who: Earthshock
Doctor Who: Earthshock by Ian Marter (Audio CD - 2 Feb. 2012)
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