Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read
I found Looking For The Goshawk to be a compelling, fascinating, entertaining and informative read. I was hooked on Conor's adventure and rooting for him at every turn in his quest. His determination is admirable and you can't help but turn the page to find out whether those elusive birds will make an appearance.

It's well written and very accessible, whether...
Published 10 months ago by Millsey

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where was the editor?
A book with lots of stuff about the Goshawk has got to be interesting, and this held my attention well, but ultimately I recall the many irritations more than anything else. On coming to the end of the last page my reaction was mainly satisfaction that I had not paid the cover price for the book, rather than regret that the journey was over.

On the credit...
Published 10 months ago by BG


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 17 Oct 2013
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
I found Looking For The Goshawk to be a compelling, fascinating, entertaining and informative read. I was hooked on Conor's adventure and rooting for him at every turn in his quest. His determination is admirable and you can't help but turn the page to find out whether those elusive birds will make an appearance.

It's well written and very accessible, whether you have a fully fledged interest in goshawks or as a casual reader (me). Though I'm no expert, or even a 'serious' birder, I learned a lot and become a tiny bit obsessed with seeing a goshawk some day for myself.

Living locally to the area, I found the search in Bedfordshire to be particularly fascinating, and found myself trying to work out the locations he describes so well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine book about a magnificent bird, 16 Oct 2013
The goshawk is without doubt our most elusive and mysterious bird of prey - rarely seen apart from occasionally in spring when they display above our woods and forests. So it's great to have a book that digs deep into the details of its life, written by an author with far more persistence and dedication that I could ever muster. Like many modern nature books it is written in the 'present historic' - giving a vivid sense of the quest to encounter the goshawk. Some people find this hard going, but I believe it does, in the right hands, bring an immediacy to the writing - and if it's good enough for Hilary Mantel... Conor Jameson combines a fine writing style with a depth of knowledge and sense of place - I look forward to his next book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a great read! Natural History books are normally ones I ..., 6 Aug 2014
By 
Mrs. T. Ashton "Tracey Ashton" (Hampshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
What a great read! Natural History books are normally ones I dip in and out of but I read this like a novel - in 5 days. It is beautifully written and I am now desperate to see a goshawk! Conor's journey was fascinating and the more so as he was looking for the nature and soul of the bird, about where it lives and why it doesn't live in other places, as much as just wanting to see one. This has definitely inspired me to read his other books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn't put it down, 17 April 2013
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
I started reading this book on Friday evening and had finished it by Sunday evening. I've always been interested in goshawks since seeing them in Sweden, and a falconer friend's bird a few years ago. Jameson's story has a really strong plot line - more so than a lot of nature writing. I really enjoyed the historic aspects of the story and there's a strong pull from one chapter to the next. If you like birds of prey and a bit of history too, you'll love this book. It's a really interesting mix of story, science and history. I;ll be reading The Goshawk, by T H White next. Full marks from me!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, well researched book about the elusive, intriguing and much maligned goshawk., 9 May 2013
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
I felt the book, like many nature writing books in my view, was a little too long. The author is not just a hawk man but works to conserve all bird species, and at times his love for all birds and his conservation work, coupled with the diary format of the book, lead him to occasionally describe encounters not directly related to goshawks, which although interesting in their own right, slow down the ongoing narrative. But these are minor criticisms.

Reading T.H. White's brilliant book 'The Goshawk' started my lifelong obsession with hawks, and I found the T.H. White thread of 'Looking for the Goshawk' particularly engaging; at one point the author meets someone who as a child in the 1930's trailed a dead rabbit on a string for White's goshawk to chase. I have seen austringers fly their goshawks, and one summer I took care of a moulting goshawk, and I found the author's difficult search for the wild goshawk captivating and thought it caught the essence of the nature of this elusive, intriguing hawk. The author is an expert bird watcher and I admired his honest admissions of how difficult it is to confirm a sighting of a goshawk. Only yesterday I saw what I assumed to be a sparrowhawk, yet it looked so big without anything to compare it with in the sky, I still wonder if it was a male goshawk. It is the author's honesty, occasional doubts and speculations which make the book so authentic. One of his speculations about there being both bold and timid individuals within a species was backed up by recent research in the 'New Scientist', which considered the evolutionary advantages of such contrasting natures. For over fifty years I've read about falcons and hawks; their high esteem in medieval times; their fall from grace and destruction; their gradual return. Even so I found out new and sometimes surprising information while reading this extremely well researched book, such as how Germany losing the First World War possibly led to goshawks being an everyday sight in the parks of Berlin. I was particularly gripped by the vividly written accounts unearthed by the author of how American goshawks ferociously attacked anyone approaching their nest.

Despite my minor criticisms I believe 'Looking for the Goshawk' deserves five stars. Overall I found this a fascinating and important book written by an author who is a passionate, well informed champion of the much maligned goshawk.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A passion for a bird, 27 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
A beautifully written account by someone almost obsessively consumed by the goshawk, yet always human, always interesting. His passion is infectious.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book search, 23 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
It was better than I had expected. could not put it down. Thank you.A very competitive price. Will shop with you again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoyed reading and will certainly recommend., 20 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Loads of little known facts about an iconic raptor and a really enjoyable read. Highly recommended. Reminded me of hours spent by myself looking for Gos.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Where was the editor?, 10 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
A book with lots of stuff about the Goshawk has got to be interesting, and this held my attention well, but ultimately I recall the many irritations more than anything else. On coming to the end of the last page my reaction was mainly satisfaction that I had not paid the cover price for the book, rather than regret that the journey was over.

On the credit side: the narrative is mainly engaging; some good information about the life of wild Goshawks is provided; the experience of being in Goshawk habitats is at times nicely evoked; there is a decent index and a bibliography: the chapter-heading vignettes are pleasant, as is the cover sketch. The author stresses persecution associated with game-shooting interests as a constraint on Goshawk populations in the UK.

On the debit side - where to start? The cover price is absurdly high for a book with merely adequate production values. It looks as though the final draft text went straight from the author's computer to the page with minimal input from designer or editor (no specific mention of editorial help in the long Acknowledgements). A good editor would have made the book half as long but twice as good. There is much repetition and even more irrelevant material (I would have preferred to learn much more about the Goshawk and much less about the author's life history and the names of all his friends). Some early passages where the author slips into generic 'nature writing' style are effective, but this soon begins to pall. I would have expected at least a few colour photographs of the Goshawk and some of the sites where it occurs, and even - given the number of times the author bangs on about being uncertain of a bird's identity - a little more focused discussion of how the Goshawk differs in appearance and behaviour from birds it is commonly confused with. Why is this debatable opinion in a book about Goshawk: "If we can just find room for a few more [wind turbines] ...we might have a hope"? He commonly appears to use "depredate" as a synonym of "predate": it is not, but it's not clear if this is a linguistic slip or an attempt at creative writing. I too have been obsessed by the Goshawk for more decades than I care to remember (and the other quasi-mythical raptor in Britain, the Honey-buzzard), and many of the author's moments of doubt and excitement in the field are instantly familiar, but ultimately I found this book disappointingly thin on substantive content.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars well researched, interesting read, 25 April 2013
This review is from: Looking for the Goshawk (Hardcover)
Mystified that anyone would think there isn't enough goshawk in this story. I found a surprise round every corner. But then raptor politics is a murky world. I can understand some people wishing to sabotage this book because of the big idea at its heart. The uncomfortable truths within it may not be popular with certain interest groups, but here is a heartfelt recommendation from a reliable and identifiable source:

"Conor Jameson's new book looks at man's role in first eliminating the Goshawk from the landscape, and then reintroducing it, and at what this says about our relationship with the natural world.

The very uncertainty inherent in the search for the bird makes it a thoroughly engrossing, sometimes even tense, read, with his travels around the UK being mixed with disappointments and surprises in equal measure.

Jameson brings the same personal slant to the subject that he used in the excellent Silent Spring Revisited, but it's mixed with plenty of hard science too.

I read the book just days before flying to Berlin, so the chapter on the city, whose parks hold a thriving population of Goshawks, was a particular favourite, but it's a great book to dip into for inspiration any time you own personal Goshawk quest starts to feel like a lost cause."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Looking for the Goshawk
Looking for the Goshawk by Conor Mark Jameson (Hardcover - 11 April 2013)
12.91
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews