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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For better for worse?
This book was bought as a birthday present for me by my daughter & son in law. On opening it the title had me baffled as did the sub-title "Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket & the Century that changed everything". All was soon revealed.

To put it in context I am a Yorkshireman, nearly seventy years old, with little interest these days in cricket. My daughter was...
Published on 7 July 2012 by J Wheeler

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good idea, not terribly well executed
Probably rather full in length, and line is sometimes awry, too. I suspect the second edition, if there is one, will be less fulsome about the late and not so great Yorkshireman Jimmy Savile.
Published 13 months ago by J. P. Post


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For better for worse?, 7 July 2012
By 
J Wheeler "Weez" (Huddersfield, West Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
This review is from: We'll Get 'Em in Sequins: Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket and the Century That Changed Everything (Wisden Sports Writing) (Hardcover)
This book was bought as a birthday present for me by my daughter & son in law. On opening it the title had me baffled as did the sub-title "Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket & the Century that changed everything". All was soon revealed.

To put it in context I am a Yorkshireman, nearly seventy years old, with little interest these days in cricket. My daughter was born in, & still lives in, Scotland; my son in law is a Southerner from Hertfordshire. Since they view me as the stereotypical Tyke I assumed they thought the book would strike a chord.

I enjoyed it. It traces the style & ups & downs of Yorkshire cricket through seven cricketers from George Hirst (1871 - 1954) to Michael Vaughan (1974 - ) using this to illustrate changes in the ideas of manliness through that time. These are not biographies but a look at the character of each man in his time. Many other Yorkshire men, often other cricketers, are brought in adding to the story. It chimed with my memories of my grandfather & father making an enjoyable nostalgic trip.

The book isn't long & this is to its advantage. It does not lose itself in great detail, but presents a developing progression of strengths & weaknesses which can easily be followed. It is clear that while the author admires the attitudes in society exemplified by the early cricketers compared with attitudes today, he finds much that has improved through time. These improvements usually have to do with the changing status of women & the uncertainties that this causes men in coming to terms with a manly role.

I am not sure if I was given this book simply for a good read, or whether it was so that I could find where along the timeline I felt at home - an interesting exercise. My only reservation about the book is that, while it will appeal to Yorkshire readers, others might tire of this excursion into God's own Country, & its funny folk. They are an acquired taste.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A triumphantly unusual cricket book, 8 Feb 2013
By 
David Reti (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: We'll Get 'Em in Sequins: Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket and the Century That Changed Everything (Wisden Sports Writing) (Hardcover)
This book is a serious and well written attempt to look at the elusive concept of "manliness", and the way that it has changed in Britain over the last 100 years. To provide some focus for its theme, the book concentrates on 7 major figures from a great county cricket club, Yorkshire. The seven chosen are George Hirst, Herbert Sutcliffe, Hedley Verity, Fred Trueman, Geoff Boycott, Darren Gough and Michael Vaughan. The whole concept sounds crazy, but to my astonishment, it works triumphantly. I thoroughly enjoyed the book and could not put it down.

It probably helps that Max Davidson was assisted by his comissioning editor, Matthew Engel, who is himself a great writer, and a master at marrying cricket with wider societal themes.

I strongly suspect that most people who give this book a try will enjoy it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good idea, not terribly well executed, 7 Aug 2013
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This review is from: We'll Get 'Em in Sequins: Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket and the Century That Changed Everything (Wisden Sports Writing) (Hardcover)
Probably rather full in length, and line is sometimes awry, too. I suspect the second edition, if there is one, will be less fulsome about the late and not so great Yorkshireman Jimmy Savile.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Fred or a quiche-eater?, 6 Mar 2013
This review is from: We'll Get 'Em in Sequins: Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket and the Century That Changed Everything (Wisden Sports Writing) (Hardcover)
Weez (brother-in-law) lent me this book as he knows I am a cricket fanatic. Couldn't put it down. In its own way it matches CLR James's "Beyond a Boundary" in that it parallels the development of sport with a change in society. However, where James can be turgid, dealing as he does with graver matters, Davidson is bright and entertaining. He includes occasional Yorkshire expressions "Like `eck" and many cricket metaphors which richly illuminate his theme. The thesis is backed by illustrations from comics, films, plays etc of the specific ages but, of course, mainly by analysis of the cricketers chosen. It is truly fascinating.
As an exiled Yorkshireman living in Cambridgeshire I have to fight down the notion that southerners are effete big girls' blouses. Now I discover we Yorkshiremen have "blouses" in our midst. As Weez says, the problem is to face the question of whether your own attitudes are frozen in a particular era or have they changed with the times. A hard one, that. Am I still a "Fred" or have I become comfortable with quiche?
Yorkshire Council cricket was dour in the sixties. My first shock on moving South was when I was asked if I was available next weekend. Where I came from you biked to the pub to see if your name was on Saturday's team sheet pinned up in the window. Availability wasn't negotiable. If you missed a game (for something as trivial as your wedding) you had to work your way back from the 2nd Team. I had no idea until I read this book that I was living through a sea change in attitudes. We remain victims of our times.
A brilliant read causing much laughter and some secret cringeing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 4 Aug 2014
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This was a present for my husband who enjoyed it.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Looks great - thought provoking, 10 May 2012
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This review is from: We'll Get 'Em in Sequins: Manliness, Yorkshire Cricket and the Century That Changed Everything (Wisden Sports Writing) (Hardcover)
Bought this as Father's Day present so only read the sleeve comments. But intrigued. I am a Yorkshirewoman so know all about True Men!! But hope it will provide entertaining read. And may even get my own copy....Quick delivery and in perfect condition. Would order again.
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