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on 6 April 2007
I'm a huge fan of Rankin's books and like most who read one have read them all. It's always been a key point of the series that Rankin has aged his central character in real time and here we start to realise just how close we are to the end of the career of John Rebus.

I have to say that I think this is possibly the best in the series since Black and Blue, it benefits from being set in reality in this case Edinburgh during the G8 summit. Tony Blair is the prime minister etc only adds to being sucked into the book.

I like this aspect as Rankin makes mention of current music and TV culture even CSI gets a mention from Rebus.

This book is as much about Siobhan as it is about Rebus and we continue to see that Rankin will be able to continue this series even without the man who was the central character. One principle character is Edinburgh and the setting isn't going to change.

I don't want to give away the ending as like all the stories there is plenty of twists and turns but I like that with Rankin the crimes are always based on real reasons like money, love and revenge.

I usually read these books in a couple of days but this time I purposely read this slower savouring every word like the fine wine this book is with only one Rankin book a year and possibly only one more Rebus story to come it's going to be tough to find another series as good as this one has consistently been.
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on 19 November 2006
Ian Rankin has been in fine form of late. Having only discovered his work about 2 years ago I have been enthralled by every single book. The Black Book, A Question of Blood and Dead Souls were particularly good, but The Naming Of The Dead is probably my favourite of all so far. This is another book in the Inspector John Rebus series, but it focusses a great deal on Siobahn Clarke who may well become the focal point of forthcoming novels by Mr Rankin. This is fast paced and reads like an episode of the TV series '24'. Rankin has also taken to dropping in popular culture references like one would expect to find in a Nick Hornby novel. This makes it similar in style and pace to The Innocent Man by John Grisham. There are a number of top notch thrillers coming out in time for the Christmas rush, and The Naming Of The Dead is as good as any of them. If you're looking to buy a book for someone as a gift I would recommend starting them on one of Rankin's earlier efforts if they are unfamiliar with his work. For fans though this is a must have, and the sooner the better.
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on 30 November 2006
Ian Rankin is surely ahead of his fellow crime writers if only in the amount of books that he has written that are consistently of a high standard. This is Rankin's 16th Rebus book since 1988, an asthonishing amount by by anyone standards -- not mentioning the other books not featuring Rebus.

This latest edition in the Rebus series sees the Scottsman nearing retirement only for a mysterious set of murders to drag him back in to murky world of criminality -- all set against the backdrop of the G8 summit. This book sees Rankin and Rebus on top form, and Rankin, in particular, uses the G8 and the protest marches that surround it to great effect.

Considering that this is the penultimate Rebus novel it seems to me that Rankin is grooming Siobhan Clarke to succeed Rebus when the old man finally retires -- or worse. She is given a more central role, like the previous few books, and we are seeing new and interesting sides to her.

Quite how Rankin keeps such a high standard is beyond me, but be sure not to miss out on the latest Rebus books before the character is finally seen off.
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on 21 December 2006
It's ironic that The Naming of the Dead has come so late in the series, since some of the later novels in it -namely, The Falls and Fleshmarket Close- have been a little weaker than the rest, as if the series was running out of steam. But this latest installment truly is Ian Rankin at his brilliant best, weaving absolutely everything in to it which made Rebus so damned good in the first place - and Cafferty's back!

For me, this is one of Ian's most balanced pieces of writing: drama, incident, suspense, mystery, political comment and intrigue, musical trivia and very sharp observation - it's all there in the right doses to keep you hooked from start to finish. Set against the G8 summit, Rebus is on the hunt for a serial killer who's been bumping off convicted rapists. He's been kept well away from the summit but it doesn't stop him from making that brilliant nuisance he does of himself and rubbing the right people up the wrong way !!

I think i've made myself clear enough. I simply loved this book!
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on 12 November 2006
I'm a huge fan of Rankin's books and like most who read one have read them all. It's always been a key point of the series that Rankin has aged his central character in real time and here we start to realise just how close we are to the end of the career of John Rebus.

I have to say that I think this is possibly the best in the series since Black and Blue, it benefits from being set in reality in this case Edinburgh during the G8 summit. Tony Blair is the prime minister etc only adds to being sucked into the book.

I like this aspect as Rankin makes mention of current music and TV culture even CSI gets a mention from Rebus.

This book is as much about Siobhan as it is about Rebus and we continue to see that Rankin will be able to continue this series even without the man who was the central character. One principle character is Edinburgh and the setting isn't going to change.

I don't want to give away the ending as like all the stories there is plenty of twists and turns but I like that with Rankin the crimes are always based on real reasons like money, love and revenge.

I usually read these books in a couple of days but this time I purposely read this slower savouring every word like the fine wine this book is with only one Rankin book a year and possibly only one more Rebus story to come it's going to be tough to find another series as good as this one has consistently been.
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The book is set in Scotland in July 2005, when one of the most important events in modern history is due to take place. The G8 summit, a meeting attended by some of the world's most powerful men. Virtually every day there is some form of demonstration or protest and the thin blue line is stretched to its limits.

Detective Inspector Rebus has been sidelined, until an MP's apparent suicide coincides with clues that a serial killer may be on the loose. The powers that be are keen to keep the lid on both the suicide and the possibility of a killer on the loose. They would not make good headline reading while such important people are around and the possibility of overshadowing such an important meeting does not bear thinking about. But they have not taken into account the fact that Rebus has never been one to stick too closely to the rule book.

When a colleague of Rebus, Siobhan Clarke becomes involved in finding the identity of the riot policeman who assaulted her mother, it looks as though both of them may be involved against both sides in the conflict.
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The book is set in Scotland in July 2005, when one of the most important events in modern history is due to take place. The G8 summit, a meeting attended by some of the world's most powerful men. Virtually every day there is some form of demonstration or protest and the thin blue line is stretched to its limits.

Detective Inspector Rebus has been sidelined, until an MP's apparent suicide coincides with clues that a serial killer may be on the loose. The powers that be are keen to keep the lid on both the suicide and the possibility of a killer on the loose. They would not make good headline reading while such important people are around and the possibility of overshadowing such an important meeting does not bear thinking about. But they have not taken into account the fact that Rebus has never been one to stick too closely to the rule book.

When a colleague of Rebus, Siobhan Clarke becomes involved in finding the identity of the riot policeman who assaulted her mother, it looks as though both of them may be involved against both sides in the conflict.
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on 27 July 2011
Can the British detective fiction cop ever escape from the shadow of Chandler's Marlowe? Judging from Rankin, the answer is no, which is not to say that The Naming of the Dead is predictable. Edinburgh is under virtual siege as the police gear up for the G8 summit and the world's political leaders descend on the city along with anarchists, hippies, and other protesters determined to disrupt the proceedings. Rankin keeps you guessing until the end as to whether and what the link could be between the death of a politician at the summit and a potential serial killer. He's great on the details of the city, the tensions between the English and Scottish police, all on overtime to protect the politicians; his women - the cops especially - avoid the usual caricatures being neither too hard-boiled nor too touchy-feely. It's good to see Siobahn Clarke taking centre stage, she's even Rebus's boss. But I'm not sure whether the appearance of real people like Midge Ure, Geldof and Tony Blair, really works. Rankin's style is so reminiscent of Chandler thrillers that modern references seem like unnatural intruders. There is one hilarious moment when Rebus encounters Big Dubya on his bicycle. But often Rebus is so much in the mould of Marlowe - the anti authoritarian cynical, wise-cracking but highly moral defender of order - with a few Scottish additions like eating too much junk food, that it feels as though he has stepped into the wrong movie when he encounters contemporary figures. And it's because of this American formulaic style that Rankin's characters never feel quite real. None the less, as always Rankin is fun, often funny. He, or at least his alter ego Rebus, is a wonderfully disenchanted observer of both the do-good politicians and the do-good celebrity protesters. I was genuinely moved by Siobahn's attempts to win her parents' love and as always by the end can't help but be seduced by the tarnished knight, Rebus.
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'Out of the corner of my eye.

I turned to look but it was gone.

I cannot put my finger on it now.

The child is grown, the dream is gone.

I have become comfortably numb.' Pink Floyd

My favorite nonconformist Detective Inspector Rebus infuriates everyone including his bosses. He is based in Edinburgh, and this is 2005 the week of the G8 summit

Ian Rankin was in Edinburg during the G8 and he conveys the atmosphere to perfection, from the people with ideals, wanting to make a difference for the poorest people in the world through to the disaffected people of the poorest parts of Edinburgh who'd like to make a difference to their own lives. Rankin catches the protestors, the gung-ho attitude of some of the police and the edginess of the crowds. I felt I was there: On occasions I could feel the anxiety. There are contrasts with the situation at Gleneagles, where no expense or detail is spared to protect the leaders and to provide facilities for their staff. The futility of the summit against the backdrop of what was happening in the real world is real and palpable.

The 16th Inspector Rebus novel is a big read set against the backdrop of one of the most tumultuous weeks in recent Scottish history: the G8. Rankin digs deeper into Rebus's psyche and continues to explore themes of justice and retribution, impermanence, loss and regret. Rebus is the same truculent character he has always been and impending old age - his 60th birthday and consequent retirement - is preying on his mind.

The Naming of The Dead which Rankin took from a ceremony to honour those who had died in Iraq which took place in Edinburgh in 2005. While every cop and his dog is pulling overtime to cope with the daily marches and demonstrations surrounding the summit, Rebus has been sidelined. Who wants him getting close to world leaders? But when a body is discovered in a glade in Auchterarder, Rebus, as the only person left in the office and he is assigned the case and finds himself visiting the G8 after all.

Almost immediately, he clashes with the English police commander in charge of G8 security. Before long, he has everybody's backs up as he explores the possibility that an MP's drop off Edinburgh Castle's ramparts was murder, not suicide, and that a serial killer is preying on convicted rapists harvested from a vigilante website. Rebus' s close friend - Siobhan Clarke - is also at odds with her superiors as she attempts to find the riot cop who clobbered her mother during one of the many demonstrations. She's also getting entangled with Rebus's nemesis, thuggish crime boss Big Ger Cafferty, who is showing an unhealthy interest in her while getting in the way of Rebus's investigations.

The strength of this novel lies in the way that Ian Rankin places the murders and the G8 to his exploration of character: We get more insight into Siobhan Clarke as she struggles with her parental relationships. Rebus is brooding on his age and increasing isolation, thinking about the unexpected death of his brother and the way he has messed up with the rest of his family. And, Rebus, has his love of rock music, Pink Floyd, The Who, U2, the Stones-he has every record and Cd and knows every verse and lyric. He often ties the crime to a lyric of a song. Some have mentioned the length of this novel. It may be overly long, but Ian Rankin was able to keep my attention with the depth of his characterization, and he has tied the plot lines together with a twist. There may be but one Rebus novel left. Policeman in Scotland must retire when they reach age 60. Ian Rankin's almost certainly the best crime novelist writing at the moment and there are few to beat him in any other genre

Rebus, as usual battles with a local crime boss, apolitical boss, his police bosses, a corrupt arms dealer and an arrogant Special Branch official from London. He's formed alliances with a reporter, a computer whiz and several police colleagues who can gather data that he cannot. Technology has become of Rebus's 'life and a web site plays heavily into the three murders. He is technically quite proficient as a detective and Rebus is someone I want on my side. Not much escapes him. Rebus and Siobhan are becoming closer and we can see the emotions in Rebus come to the fore. There is respect and love, but unmentioned as of yet.

Ian Rankin has said in an interview , "At the core of The Naming of the Dead is a pretty basic question: What difference do we make in the world? Rebus is cast as the aging cynic, while his colleague Siobhan is younger and more idealistic. So while Rebus is dismissive of the power of rock stars to change the situation in Africa, Siobhan is hopeful. Can concerts alter world events? Can marches and protests change politicians' minds? Can the individual make a difference? Rebus is beginning to realise that during all the years he's been a cop, and for all the bad people he's put behind bars... crime is always with us. As for my own view on all the above... it's somewhere between Rebus and Siobhan!"

Highly Recommended, Comfortably Numb or Not. prisrob
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The book is set in Scotland in July 2005, when one of the most important events in modern history is due to take place. The G8 summit, a meeting attended by some of the world's most powerful men. Virtually every day there is some form of demonstration or protest and the thin blue line is stretched to its limits.

Detective Inspector Rebus has been sidelined, until an MP's apparent suicide coincides with clues that a serial killer may be on the loose. The powers that be are keen to keep the lid on both the suicide and the possibility of a killer on the loose. They would not make good headline reading while such important people are around and the possibility of overshadowing such an important meeting does not bear thinking about. But they have not taken into account the fact that Rebus has never been one to stick too closely to the rule book.

When a colleague of Rebus, Siobhan Clarke becomes involved in finding the identity of the riot policeman who assaulted her mother, it looks as though both of them may be involved against both sides in the conflict.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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