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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 20 January 2004
This was an excellent read. I really enjoyed every page of this book. What amazes me about it (and, in fact, every book in "The Knowledge" series) is how much I learnt from them. After being thoroughly entertained by the adventures of code-cracking secret agent Luke Warm, I suddenly realised that I knew an awful lot more about codes than any other book had ever told me. Many "serious" non-fiction books leave you so bored that all the information goes in one ear and out of the other. Not so this one! I would recommend it to everyone, everywhere. Honestly.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 16 March 2007
'As Mary, Queen of Scots discovered too late, it's the important words in your messages that you need to replace with code. Some of the most important ones are the names of people and places. Replacing those with codenames can make it very hard for outsiders to understand your message......

If you want to be in the know, get 'The Knowledge'!'

If you have read Diana Kimpton's other books, e.g. Spectacular Special Effects, you will appreciate how she puts knowledge across, in a humorous way. This book is no exception.

A colourful, witty cover opens to 157 pages, split over 13 chapters:-

Introduction
Code-cracking timeline
The secret word of codes
Codes or ciphers?
The Great Hieroglyphics Mystery
Hidden messages
Simple ciphers
Codenames and code talkers
Juggling letters
Outwitting the code breakers
Machines that keep secrets
Computer codes
Alien encounters

Black and white illustrations/cartoons throughout with `did you know boxes?', things to try, and notes from `The Secret Agent's Handbook'.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 7 November 2003
This book was so interesting that I had to read it slowly to make sure I absorbed every word. Not only does it explain how some really tough codes work, there's masses of fascinating historical detail about how making and breaking codes changed the course of wars. It even explains how the enigma machine worked. I loved it.
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on 17 January 2010
My Daughter (age 11) is not a booky girl, but she absolutely loved this book! It is highly recommended!
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on 8 May 2015
Speedy delivery and book as described
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