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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars English Association Award Winner
Winner of the Key Stage 1 Fiction Award in the English Association's 2011 English 4-11 Best Children's Illustrated Books Awards

Not everyone sees the world the same way. For Thomas, who is visually impaired, colour is something more powerful than for most. For him, colour is something you can hear and smell and touch and taste. This incredible book uses raised...
Published on 31 May 2011 by English Association English 4-11

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book but not for Braille readers
This is such an unusual book. It describes how colours are perceived by a blind child, and every page has lovely tactile illustrations. All the text is in white print on black pages, and in Braille, which is a great idea BUT sadly the Braille is not raised enough to be accessible to a blind reader. I have asked some Braille-reading children I work with and they were not...
Published on 23 Jan 2011 by Jill B


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars English Association Award Winner, 31 May 2011
This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
Winner of the Key Stage 1 Fiction Award in the English Association's 2011 English 4-11 Best Children's Illustrated Books Awards

Not everyone sees the world the same way. For Thomas, who is visually impaired, colour is something more powerful than for most. For him, colour is something you can hear and smell and touch and taste. This incredible book uses raised line drawings and Braille letters to help sighted readers to understand how Thomas sees the world. The pages in this book are black, but the intricate designs in shiny raised black on the matt pages, along with the most visual of written descriptions ensures that this book is a riot of colour, told through the power of language and illustration.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book but not for Braille readers, 23 Jan 2011
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
This is such an unusual book. It describes how colours are perceived by a blind child, and every page has lovely tactile illustrations. All the text is in white print on black pages, and in Braille, which is a great idea BUT sadly the Braille is not raised enough to be accessible to a blind reader. I have asked some Braille-reading children I work with and they were not able to read the Braille. It is too flat. This is such a shame, as the concept of the book deserves to be enjoyed by sighted and non-sighted readers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good to Share, 11 Jun 2013
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
This is one of three books I bought to support a visually impaired child that I work with. It's one of the few books that I've found on Amazon that have a brailled translation and textured pictures, and I read it with my 1:1 child and a few friends for the first time today.

Some of the pictures are very nicely translated, like the water, grass, rain and hair. These feel interesting and like what they're depicting. However, other pictures are just... pictures. Like the flowers are just flowers. The kite is a kite. It sounds a bit mad to criticise this as an issue, but drawings for children with visual impairments need to be drawn in a certain way. The flower petals over lap and are drawn at angles, which by touching makes it not feel like a flower. Same with the kite and strawberries. There are so many things overlapping it becomes very confusing for those that are solely experiencing the book with their fingers. Also, all the drawings are done by simply raising the lines. There is no variation in texture or medium.

The descriptions are quite unusual though and not necessarily what I'd go for; blue for the sun's rays and sharp mustard for yellow. Some are clearly linked to the colour of the descriptor but others are quite different. On the one hand, kudos for breaking the mould and looking at the writing in a new way, but on the other hand for children who have never had the experience of colour it would make sense to keep the links between colour and taste/texture/smell, like the red for strawberries or green for cut grass.

Finally, I've seen it mentioned before but the braille isn't very suitable for reading. The dots are printed onto the page with the same stuff they used to raise the line drawings as opposed to being printed onto the page. This means the dots are too light to read even with the most sensitive fingers. However, it's nice for sighted children to be able to feel the page too and see what the braille is like without risking expensive braille books or precious work being scrubbed to death by curious fingers.

One thing I'd like to point out to anyone buying the book for a professional environment is that the author and illustrator are neither blind nor have any life experience with blindness. What they have conceived is a lovely concept which seems to be quite rare (there is very little available in the main stream for children with VI) but it certainly isn't as accessible or detailed as books like Heart of Stone.

Otherwise, it's a great concept book with a lot of talking points, whether or not you have a child with VI in your home or work life.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Imagine, 5 July 2014
This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
Brilliant book for the sighted too!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely book and good seller, 19 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
My favorite book. If I had to carry 1 book around with me for the rest of my life it would be this one. beautiful.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Braille readers, 14 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
Fascinating book -so clever! Not sure the Braille is raised enough for young Braille readers. Recommended for sharing between visually impaired and sighted children.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A different book, 4 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
I had read about this book and I was really interested to have it.
The book totally met my expectations.
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4.0 out of 5 stars a book with a difference, 17 July 2013
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
Makes you think and appreciate the world around us. Useful for assisting you in consdering those with additional needs. fab
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just perfect, 3 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
I ordered this book for my daughter who is a special needs teacher, she was over the moon with it and her children get a lot of joy from this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Black is not the only colour, 27 Oct 2011
This review is from: The Black Book of Colours (Hardcover)
What a fantastic book. This will introduce the concept of visual impairment to children of all ages. Really will make children and adults think
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