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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too
In 1944, two spies are sent deep within Nazi-occupied Holland. Their mission - to help those involved with the Dutch resistance movement. Both men are trained to send, receive, and translate coded messages. These messages contain valuable information concerning the movements of the Nazi army. Even though these men face death at every turn, they are committed to stopping...
Published on 25 Sep 2008 by TeensReadToo

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3.0 out of 5 stars What Trixie knew
The dual time perspectives (1945/1995)in "Tamar" make it a very approachable way for young adult (and older) readers to get an idea of the different sorts of courage it took for Dutch Resistance fighters and ordinary townsfolk to fight the Nazi's during WWII. The 1945 narrative is adventurous and gripping, without sacrificing either the touches of humour populations...
Published on 20 Mar 2012 by Papergirl


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, 25 Sep 2008
By 
TeensReadToo "Eat. Drink. Read. Be Merrier." (All Over the US & Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
In 1944, two spies are sent deep within Nazi-occupied Holland. Their mission - to help those involved with the Dutch resistance movement. Both men are trained to send, receive, and translate coded messages. These messages contain valuable information concerning the movements of the Nazi army. Even though these men face death at every turn, they are committed to stopping the evil that is associated with the Nazi regime.

In 1995, Tamar is dealing with the suicide of her grandfather. He has left Tamar a box full of clues that she cannot decipher. She decides that it is one of his elaborate puzzles; one that Tamar may not be able to solve. After enlisting the help of her cousin, Yoyo, Tamar sets off on a journey to discover why her grandfather left her these treasures, and what they mean to her family.

Mal Peet has created a novel that intertwines the story of a young girl's journey of self-discovery and a young soldier's fight to stay alive. It is a beautifully written novel that contains secrets within secrets. Peet leads the reader on an adventure that is both intriguing and frightening. Readers may be left speechless once the truth unfolds.

A definite must-read for those who love historical fiction.

Reviewed by: LadyJay
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Written, 1 Jan 2009
This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
Wow. I really loved this book and how beautifully written it is. The book is almost split in two: the "Modern" half and the "Old" half.

Two British communicators, Tamar and Dart are sent to Holland to help the resistance against the Nazis and the story unravells to reveal romance, betrayal and mystery. The book then switches to "Now" where we follow the story of one these men's grandchildren who is just trying to understand her grandfather's (Tamar's) suicide which has left behind confusion. He has left behind a box full of clues from which she must discover the shocking truth of her grandparents and father that turn everything she has known on its head. A powerful book that really keeps you thinking long after you have finished.

Highly recommended to teenagers and older.

P.S

Happy New Year 2009 everyone!
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35 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational stuff, 3 Feb 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
Tamar is an amazing story for young adults - and, indeed, older readers! It is challenging and impelling, but stays within the understanding of a teenager. It is an excellent example of a modern 'classic', using a multi-layered approach, providing opportunity for further reading and research.
Mal Peet manages to get inside the head of a young woman, who is independent and thoughtful. The way she develops as a person will appeal to many, as her thoughts and feelings are explored.
The wartime aspect is completely compelling, providing excitement and the final twist in the story.
Three generations of my family has read and enjoyed it - I would recommend this book to anyone, whether they love reading or not.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worthy Winner, 13 July 2006
This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
Mal Peet's sensitive and gripping novel is well honoured by the 2006 Carnegie Medal. A tale of love and betrayal, courage and human tragedy, the storyline dips backwards and forwards from wartime Holland and the grim events of the final freezing winter of the war to a young girl's awakening love in 1995.

A brilliant literary feast from Walker Books burgeoning fiction list. I rate this five stars - gold at that!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, 24 Aug 2008
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This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
Mal Peet has done it again. I thought 'Keeper' was absolutely brilliant but with 'Tamar' he has excelled himself. Set mainly in WW2 this is a story of two 'British' undercover agents, 'Dart' and 'Tamar', helping the Dutch Resistance against the Nazis. Their mission is tense enough but what gave the story an extra twist and made it all the more gripping was not, as I thought would happen, the inevitable capture and torture by the Gestapo. That didn't happen. Instead we have a tangled, tragic love story that is only uncovered years later by sixteen year old Tamar, grand daughter of William Hyde. William could be Dart or Tamar - we only find out at the end.
This is an excellent book, full of attention to detail, excellent writing, wry humour and page turning action. It reminded me a little of Aidan Chambers' 'Postcards from No Man's land' which also won the Carnegie, but in Tamar the plotting is even tighter.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely Tense, 19 April 2008
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
This book is well written, well researched and keeps you turning the page with its tense and masterful plotting. It deals with the subject of the Dutch Resistance and SOE at the end of WW2, and the story is so exciting I can't believe nobody has picked up the film rights yet.

The story is actually in two strands. The narrative of a sixteen year old girl, the Tamar of the story, whose grandfather commits suicide in 1995. He leaves behind a box for her filled with clues which she must follow to unravel the mysteries of her grandfather's past. This sounds trite but it isn't. It is written with realism and a kind of gut wrenching honesty that roots it firmly in believable territory.

The other narrative strand is the activities of two SOE operatives in Holland, Tamar and Dart and their mission during what the winter of 1944 and spring of 1945, when the Germans, aware they were losing the war were attempting to 'tidy' up some of their activities, including those in Holland.

This is a book for teenagers, probably older teenagers as the subject matter is not shied away from. It reminded me in a lot of ways of the excellent 'Postcards from No Man's Land' by Aidan Chambers, which deals with a lot of the same subject matter. I would highly recommend it for adults also, as there is nothing to pigeonhole it into the 'child' section of a bookshop, and at times it can be a really quite grim read. I loved it, and am now contemplating his other work despite the fact that it is about football.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BRILLIANT!, 2 April 2008
By 
Alison B. Hammett "Mimoduck1" (Crouch End London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
I'm in yr 7 and my english teacher told me to read this book. I'm 1/2 way through and I just can't put it down! I love reading second world war 2 book and this id the best I've read in along time!
I would say that some of the words used in this book can be hard to understand!I say that YOU ALL should buy this book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very fine book, 20 Oct 2010
This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
This book first came to my attention when travelling on a Melbourne tram (Australia) last year. I noticed a teenage girl sitting opposite me was very absorbed in the book she was reading. Most school children of that age are normally in a trance as they listen to their iPods, but she was quite different as she did not have an iPod in her ears, nor did she look up as she read her book. This continued for about 15 minutes, so I thought this must be a very good book. I sneaked a look at its title and made a mental note of it. It was called "Tamar". This in itself caught my attention because I know it is the name of a river in Tasmania that runs through Launceston and its surrounds. I lived in the Tamar valley outside Launceston for 18 months and could see the river from my house. I also knew it was named after a river in England.

I stored the book's title up for over a year before doing a Google search for it and thereby finding out the author's name and publishing details. I then searched for a copy in local libraries and bookshops without success, before ordering it on Amazon UK in July of 2010. It then took me another couple of months to get round to reading it on holidays after it arrived. I am now just finished it and taking the unusual step of writing a review for it as I was so taken with it. Whilst it is classed as YA literature, I am someone in my 50s and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The narrator is an English teenage girl named Tamar whose grandfather has just died. This follows the disappearance of her father five years earlier when she was 10. The grandfather has left her a box containing a variety of objects including maps, photos and various coded messages. Solving the mystery in this box will enable her to make sense of her grandfather's death. In doing so, the book crosses between 1995 England with Tamar and 1940s Nazi occupied Holland where her grandparents fought with the Dutch resistance.

From this basic plot, the author Mal Peet weaves a book that is part-thriller, part-mystery, part-action adventure and part coming-of-age story. These various elements are woven together in a suspenseful, subtle, skilled and emotionally satisfying way.

Reading this book involves sorting out the mystery at the book's heart, which as Tamar's grandfather says in the book is like: "PE for the head." But the book is also much more than this, as it is gripping, emotionally engaging and moving as Tamar travels the journey of her quest.

To reveal more about the book would spoil it for other readers, I would simply say that I thoroughly recommend this book both to a YA and an adult audience. I also now know why that schoolgirl was so absorbed in reading "Tamar" on that tram last year.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lies, lies and deception..., 19 Dec 2008
This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
Having thoroughly enjoyed Mal Peet's outstanding debut - Keeper - and the equally acclaimed follow-up - Penalty - I approached Tamar with high expectations. Although I didn't find it quite as accessible as its predecessors, it has a depth and a resonance that makes it an altogether different animal.

Tamar is a slow-burning tale of deception; the behind-the-scenes accounts of wartime espionage and its accompanying deceits, are both fascinating and occasionally, harrowing. What really separates this novel from its peers though is its intriguing dual-narrative style, which switches seamlessly between 1945 and 2005. The reader is subtly drawn into the claustrophobic worlds of the eponymous heroes, until the book's climax is reached in such a way as to be both obvious and somehow still shocking.
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24 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FINALLLY a worthy Carnegie winner!!, 4 Aug 2006
By 
J. SCARROTT "me" (uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tamar (Paperback)
For the past three years, I have been part of a Carnegie shadowing group who read the 5 or 6 books nominated for the short list for the award and review them. Last year and the year before, I was very disappointed as the one I wanted to win didn't (or in last year's case I only one I couldnt STAND won).So this year I thought,'Oh no, another awful book will win,' but I was wrong.

Tamar is a thrilling, beautifully written novel with a heart.The characters feel very real,their emotions are as clear as the words on the page.

At my school, many said this book was too old for many reviewing the books but I loved the fact that a book aimed at older teenagers was nominated for the shortlist and became a(very worthy)winner.Highly recommended.
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Tamar
Tamar by Mal Peet (Paperback - 5 Jun 2006)
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