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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read!
I think this book is a great read, but as it says in the book, it isn't good for those people who like happy endings. It is quite creepy. I would call it a thriller for children. I enjoyed it loads, and I would recomend it to people looking for a new series to read!
Published on 3 Sep 2001

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars This wasnt for me, but i was told it was good!
i bought this for my son so i not read it! I cant give a fair rating but he was happy
Published 22 months ago by jamer153


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read!, 3 Sep 2001
By A Customer
I think this book is a great read, but as it says in the book, it isn't good for those people who like happy endings. It is quite creepy. I would call it a thriller for children. I enjoyed it loads, and I would recomend it to people looking for a new series to read!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars WHAT AN AMAZING BOOK!, 4 May 2006
I am a fan of the series of unfortunate events and this book is related to the first book. This book is about the Baudelaire orphans who are Sunny, Klaus and Violet. This time they went and stayed with a relative Dr. Montgomery who is a herpetologist who studied snakes. He treated them well and the Baudelaries were happy. But one day, the worst thing in the world happened, Count Olaf, who wanted to get their fortune pretended to be Stephano and he went in and lived with the orphans. He will do any terrible things to get the fortune. Lemony Snicket stays faithful to the first book, the Baudelaries were unhappy, the evil Count Oalf returned and the writing style of the book is unchanged. It is exciting to read this book and I will recommened this book to everyone, but be warned, everything will be unpleasant.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Baudelaire kids enjoy a brief moment of happiness, 18 Oct 2003
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
"The Reptile Room" is Book the Second in A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snickert. It professes--the word "professes" here means "claims to be"--to be the story of the three unlucky Baudelaire children, but I suspect that, with all due respect, Lemony Snickert is really engaging in vocabulary building skills for his young readers. Now, this has no effect on me because I already know what "ridicule," "preempt," "crude," and "retrieve" mean and do not need to have them defined for me. However, I suspect that for many young readers this book may well be, and I hestiate to use the word, educational.
Unlike the first volume in the series, which began with the Baudelaire children Violet, Klaus, and Sunny being orphaned by the death of their parents and being placed in the clutches of the wicked, bad, mean and nasty Count Olaf, "The Reptile Room" provides a brief window of opportunity for readers to have high hopes for their future. Mr. Poe has entrusted their care to Dr. Montgomery Montgomery, who is not only their late father's cousin's wife's brother but also a herpetologist of some repute (and the discoverer of the impressively misnamed Incredibly Deadly Viper). Dr. Montgomery gives the children the run of his home in general and the Reptile Room in particular, and plans to take them along on his expedition to Peru. The children are happy and gay, but such feelings do not last long in this series and before the end of the tale there is a deadly snake, a murder, a car accident, and the return of the worst of all possible persons.
Fortunately, Violent Baudelaire is especially good at inventing things, her brother Klaus likes to read, and Sunny may be inarticulate but is still a clever little baby. These characteristics go a long way towards explaining why there are additional volumes in A Series of Unfortunate Events instead of it ending in complete disaster earlier along the way. Even if it requires children to learn new words and to think of creative ways of solving problems, I would still maintain reading the works of Lemony Snickert to be a good thing. The story of misery and woe continues in "The Wide Window," which apparently will involve Curdled Cave, a small bag of shattered glass, the menu from the Anxious Clown restaurant, and a test tube containing one (1) Lachrymose Leech. However, younger readers should feel free to read something diverting and possibly even happy before proceeding to the next series of tragic events regarding the Baudelaire children.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book worth reading, 1 Jan 2004
By 
Charlotte (Watford, England) - See all my reviews
I went to the library in search of a good book that would keep me occupied during the long summer holiday. I picked up a book that intrigued me by reading the back cover. So with no idea what I was in for, I rented it and began to read. This book kept me on the edge of my seat. Before I knew it I had finished the book, but my holiday was not over. I looked at the front cover to find I had read the second book of the series. So I went back to the library to rent the first. As so with the second I enjoyed the first. For christmas I asked for the Series Of Unfortunate Events. I read seven of the books i had had in the series in two months. This was unusual for me, for at my age I didn't like to read. After having these books I passed them down to my younger sister, who was seven years of age, to read. But why should you read it? It's interesting, griping, realistic and is something most people can relate to. Losing parents, having a brother or sister, to fell happy and sad, and sticking together whatever happens. I could tell exactly what happens in this book, but why don't you rent it or buy it and find out for yourself.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alluring...which here means enchanting reading, 7 Jun 2004
By 
J. L. Kelly - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
To be honest I had never heard of Lemony Snicket and had bought this book by complete accident one day while I was looking for Pullman's dark materials trilogy! However, I am glad to say that this was a very enthralling and entertaining little book.
This is the second book following the adventures or rather unfortunate circumstances of the three Baudelaire children who have been made homeless and parentless from the first book of unfortunate events. Without giving too much of the storyline away the orphans are delivered to their Uncle Monty who deals in herpetology (the study of snakes). Thus his laboratory is called the Reptile room which holds some of the most bizarre snakes known to anyone.
From here we all know something is going to go wrong, it's just a matter of when. So when Uncle Monty's new assistant turns up after the mysterious resignation of his previous one things are not what they seem.
Needless to say, any fan of the unfortunate series of events books will love this second book. It is teeming, meaning full to the brim of irony, dark humour and funny characters. I will definitely be continuing to buy these little books as they are very entertaining and are an easy and comfortable read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GRIM, GRAVE AND...UNPUTDOWNABLE!!!!!!, 4 Dec 2007
Though this series is famous for being sad and miserable, it is sometimes also slightly funny. At the beginning of the book, it says, 'To Beatrice-My love for you shall live forever. You, however, did not.' It is a wonderful, though miserable and true, beginning of the story. It spurs you on and you may feel like a voice is whispering to you, 'Go on, read it!' and the story is just as amusing as the creepy phrase to who the book is for.
It may take you to read the first book too to appreciate the rest of the series, but it is definately worth it.
This book is about three Buadelaire orphans who, I'm afraid wherever they go, drags woe and misery behind them. These children are intelligent, resourceful and kind. However, they had no luck. You may have thought they had a tiny drop of luck somewhere but the only luck they have is that they are alive. In fact, that may not be lucky because if they were dead, they wouldn't have had to be tormented by the woeful things that come their way.
In my opinion, this book is absoloutely fantastic and has clever ways of explaining you a tricky words that people may not know. How? You will never know unless you read the book...!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The reptile room, 18 Aug 2001
By A Customer
I found this book so good i read all 190 page in only 2 days. This is one of the best books i have ever ever read!! I think the adventures of the Baudelaire orphans should be read by everyone in the world so all can see what an great book this is!!!
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolutely brilliant book, happy, sad and creepy., 12 Jun 2001
By A Customer
When the Baudelaire orphans go to be raised by their Uncle Monty, at first they have the time of their lives. Uncle Monty promises to take them to Peru on a snake expedition, but at the last minute his assistant resigns and is replaced by Stephano who seems rather odd. Is he actually their worst enemy, Count Olaf, in disguise? Find out how Monty dies in suspicious circumstances, and what happens to the children next! This is a very well written book which explains everything clearly. It is a mixture of happy, sad, exciting and creepy, and keeps you turning the pages to find out what happens next. At the end you feel as if you have to get the next book right then to carry on reading the tales of the Baudelaire orphans. I would recommend this book for boys or girls of 9+.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, 14 Oct 2006
By 
TeensReadToo "Eat. Drink. Read. Be Merrier." (All Over the US & Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
As the Baudelaire children--Violet, Klaus, and Sunny--narrowly escape the marriage scheme of Count Olaf and his theatre troupe of The Bad Beginning (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1), we pick up with Mr. Poe once again leading the children to the home of another relative. Dr. Montgomery Montgomery, a revered member of the Herpetological Society, is a man who has spent his life studying snakes. As the children arrive at his home, via Lousy Lane, they are at first leary of "Uncle Monty" and his REPTILE ROOM. They soon learn, however, that their newfound Uncle is a kind man, providing them each with their own room and entertaining activities that they each enjoy--space and materials to invent for Violet, books and a reading nook for Klaus, and plenty of biting material for Sunny.

As the orphans settle in to their new abode, Uncle Monty teaches them about snakes, most especially his new discovery, the Incredibly Deadly Viper. As we learn that said snake is a misnomer--the word "misnomer" here meaning "a wrong name"--the children become excited about the upcoming trip to Peru to study new snake life. Unfortunately, as most everything in the lives of the Baudelaire children is, Uncle Monty's new assistant, Stefano, is no other than Count Olaf in disguise.

Alas, just as with their previous adventures, no one listens to the children's concerns until it is too late. As Stefano aka Count Olaf threatens the children into silence, he begins to hatch his evil plan, which includes getting rid of the snake-loving doctor and absconding to Peru with the children, where he can wait for Violet to come of age, grab her fortune, and dispose of the children.

Saved in the nick of time--yet again--by a convoluted series of events, we find the children once again looking for a kind relative to care for them. As THE REPTILE ROOM ends, Mr. Poe drives off into the sunset with a miserable Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, and we wait to see which new series of unfortunate events will befall the children.

Another quick read, THE REPTILE ROOM is highly recommended depending on the maturity of your child. Another dark tale of misery and woe, this book is highly entertaining for those who understand that it's fiction.

Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius"
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27 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still unfortunate, still great, 11 Jun 2004
By 
Sebastian Fernandez (Tampa, Florida United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Lemony Snicket stays faithful to his strategy in the first book in this series, the Baudelaire siblings are still going through unhappy situations, the vicious Count Olaf is back, and the author's writing style remains unchanged. The book is fun to read and I recommend it to people of all ages, but please pay heed to the warning the author presents in the back cover. In essence, this warning is: if you are looking for a happy story, go search elsewhere.
After Count Olaf's plan to get the Baudelaire orphans money failed, he was lucky enough to escape. The three siblings, Violet (the inventor), Klaus (the reader) and Sunny (the biter) are placed with a relative in the country. Dr. Montgomery is a herpetologist, thus he studies snakes, and he receives the three children in an extremely friendly and loving way. Uncle Morty teaches the kids about snakes and reptiles and everyone is living happily, but grimmer times will soon arrive. Count Olaf reappears and he is meaner than before, his plot to obtain the riches from Baudelaire orphans is heinous and the count will stop at nothing to achieve his goal.
The author continues using the technique of defining words that do not need be defined in his attempt to ridicule some children books. He even lets Klaus express the frustration some readers may feel when Mr. Poe is explaining to him what ridicule means and Klaus snaps back "I know what 'ridicule' means". Snicket also shows what a great sense of humor he has and he uses it to criticize some legendary classics, like Little Red Riding Hood and The Boy Who Cried Wolf. For example, in the case of the latter, he states that the moral of the story is not that people should not lie, but "Never live somewhere where wolves are running around loose". I am looking really forward to read the next installment in this enchanting series.
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The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events)
The Reptile Room (A Series of Unfortunate Events) by Lemony Snicket (Paperback - 4 Jan 2010)
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