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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gone - Lyrical Reviews
If you need to go on a crash diet then my advice is to read this book. When I first downloaded Gone onto my Kindle I thought it was going to take me ages to get through it as it's pretty hefty - digitally speaking - but within only a few days I was distraught to find I'd hit the last page. Apart from work I suspended all other activities and a bowl of cereal became a...
Published on 3 July 2011 by purpledoor64

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A New Concept
Starts off great but gets a bit repetitive later on. There is no ending so you need to go on to the next novel..
Published 13 months ago by Heugon


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42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gone - Lyrical Reviews, 3 July 2011
This review is from: Gone (Paperback)
If you need to go on a crash diet then my advice is to read this book. When I first downloaded Gone onto my Kindle I thought it was going to take me ages to get through it as it's pretty hefty - digitally speaking - but within only a few days I was distraught to find I'd hit the last page. Apart from work I suspended all other activities and a bowl of cereal became a suitable substitute for dinner. I literally trembled my way through Gone and could not abide putting it down in case something hideous should happen to the characters in my imagination. Every time I had to switch off, the heroes were on the point of defeat and I couldn't bear to leave them hanging there, so switch offs were fairly infrequent (that's what I particularly love about my Kindle, needing no hands to read is a real aid to multi-tasking!).

The writing is spot on for this kind of story, the pace is perfect to keep your heart pounding and the story complex and long enough to leave you satisfied. So many questions are raised right from the start and the lack of answers is agonising but the real key to Michael Grant's writing is that no answer is predictable. I was literally left scratching my head, teetering on the point of confusion when I turned the final page and I don't know how I have managed not to dive straight into the next book - some form of mental masochism I suppose.

It's the main character, Sam, that holds all the threads of the story together and keeps his friends alive with his quick thinking and natural courage. Sam offers a glimmer of hope that in the event of adult eradication a leader would step up who was good-natured and had incredible common sense but at the same time, his inevitable demise hangs over the reader as a countdown to his fifteenth birthday is issued at the start of every chapter. Sam and his friends are so easy to empathise with, they all have their own problems and their own way of dealing with those problems and none of them lack characterisation.

Perhaps the most terrifying aspect of this story is that it is so reasonable to imagine that out of the book universe, if all the adults really did vanish, every single event the characters go through could actually happen. Why wouldn't the bullies become tyrants? Why wouldn't it take so long to organise search parties for the youngest survivors that they end up finding only corpses? Why wouldn't a kid take over the McDonald's to try to boost morale? More importantly, the kids have real problems like bulimia, cowardice, autism and psychopathy, which makes for an interesting cast that set up engaging plot assets and storylines - they're not just your average book heroes with endearing little flaws, they have the hardcore issues you would find in any bunch of actual kids.

You do start to freak a little at the realism, like when you were forced to read Lord Of The Flies for GCSE, and that's exactly what this book is - Lord Of The Flies with microwaves and mutations. There are moments when I felt genuinely uncomfortable and slightly disturbed, there are vivid images that will stay with you, popping into your head at unexpected times and reminding you that you haven't read any of the sequels yet. But if you can swallow all that, you'll find in Gone an astonishing exploration of courage - what it means to different people, how different people achieve it and how people deal with not having it.

Gone is so worth reading and when you have, I challenge you to say you were not deeply affected by it.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "GONE", 21 April 2012
This review is from: Gone (Gone Novels) (Hardcover)
I am Thirty Six years old. I had just finished reading "The Hunger Games" Trilogy, and was craving for more of the same. That is when I came across the "Gone" series. I thougt I would give it a go.

From the first chapeter, I was sucked into a deeply chaotic world of scared kids and strange happenings. I have a 10 year old son who suffers from various aspects of Autisum and ADHD. His little brother Is serverly Autistic. Reading these books, I felt an instant connection to these charaters. "Little Pete" is written exactly as Jack and I could see the manurisims and character traits in every description from the author.

These books are well written and very intensly reaserched. The action is tense and captivating, while the peril has you on the edge of your seat. I felt myself screaming at the charaters at some points and cheering at others at three o'clock in the morning because I had to keep reading.

This series will have your willing the heros and cursing the villans. It is simply amazing. There are parts that will shock you, for a kids author, but he keeps it just the write side of dark.

I would advise any body with the love of "Lord of the Fies" "Hunger Games" "X-men" to get this book. It is all three in one with a modern backdrop.

I cant wait to read the others in the series. I hope they are as good as the first and more compelling.

Simply Brilliant.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for adults and teens, 7 Jun 2012
By 
Mrs. S. M. Codd (Germany) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Gone (Paperback)
I took this book on holiday with me and read it in a day. Realy great read, am awaiting the next book! My teenage daughter also read it and loved it. Book cover states 12+, which i agree with due to some violence and the nature of the story (all adults disappear and kids turn to bullying and violence with no rules). If you've read the hunger games, which has more violence, you should be fine with this. No swearing or sexual content at all. No graphic descriptions of violence, but the lack of adults causes disturbing behaviour that sensitive individuals may find upsetting to read about. This book is a real page-turner, the only downside is the story doesn't end - another 5 books to go!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gone, 15 Jan 2011
This review is from: Gone (Kindle Edition)
Gone is one of those books that had been sitting on my bookshelf for months, gathering dust, being sadly ignored. I'd picked it up a few times, read the first few pages, been mildly impressed but then moved on to something else.

Eventually I realised I had to just sit down and get going with it. I'd read so many positive reviews of the series that I felt I was missing out but whenever I tried I just couldn't get into it. I nearly gave up but after being struck down with food poisoning this week (never reheat out of date salmon) I spent the last two bedridden days with my head buried in Gone. Finally.

It's a brilliant book, it really is and deserves all the praise it's received. I was worried it would be another overhyped supernatural teen book but Gone is worlds away from that. Grant's writing is superb - he doesn't get bogged down with complex sentence structure and hyperbolic waves of description. Instead the language is snappy, straight to the point and does nothing to detract from the stellar plot.

One of the most interesting things Grant tackles is how each character handles the situation. The kids in Gone (none older than 14) are thrust into a completely alien situation that really does bring out the best and worst in each person. Some shine through as absolute stars (I'm looking at you Mother Mary) and some take advantage of the situation and become the bad guys, the criminals, the killers (yes, Orc and co., that was aimed at you).

There are books where the writing is what sucks you in and books where it's the plot that captures your attention. In Gone it's definitely the plot. It's so strong, so well researched and there's not a plot hole in sight (from what I could see, anyway). The characters are instantly likeable (who doesn't have a soft spot for Edilio and MacDonald's Alfred? Oh, and Computer Jack and Mary - see, they're all awesome) and the villains are fantastic. So hateable, so corrupt but with so much depth. I couldn't help but feel a twinge of affection for Diana and Caine but the true villain in Gone is the twisted, psychopath Drake. Terrifying.

Talking coyotes, flying snakes, some horrific monster in a mine shaft - this is a novel that requires you to suspend your disbelief somewhat and any trace of bad writing could easily break the spell and make you realise that Gone is completely implausible and you are just sitting at home reading a book. However, I was there with Sam, Astrid and co. through thick and thin, through all the twists and turns and, after taking a few hours to digest this wonderful book, I'm ready to tackle the next in the series, Hunger.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably not a better book!, 5 Nov 2010
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Gone (Hardcover)
This book could not have been written out any better! It is a action packed book and recommend this book for those who like an exciting start and end. I have the the English version which is signed by him! My brother had read this book and passed it on to me which I thoroughly enjoyed that I couldn't put down literally! I was readin till 10pm and I go to bed at 8:30pm! Sam Temple (Main character) is in charge of everything and is being pressured for every little thing. The good thing about this book is that it doesn't follow one character throughout the whole book! The book slowly introduences new characters that become co star type. If u haven't read this i recommend u DEFINITELY DO READ IT!!!!!!!!!!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A New Concept, 21 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Gone (Kindle Edition)
Starts off great but gets a bit repetitive later on. There is no ending so you need to go on to the next novel..
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK but beware that you will be starting a series with this one!, 15 Jan 2010
This review is from: Gone (Paperback)
Intrigued by the back of the book I grabbed a copy in the YA section I happened to be passing. Being a few years past 'YA' fiction my conclusion is that the book was OK/average on the whole. In contrast to other reviewers I certainly remember reading far scarier and more gruesome things as a teenager plouging the adult horror section of the library - Gone was pretty tame stuff.
Sadly the interesting premise dwindled away when it became clear that there was going to be no resolution in this book. All I wanted to know was: why did this happen and how will it be resolved (if at all). Rather like the tv show Lost this book has taken a fascinating idea but is now going to string it out for all its worth ( in other words). The writing is OK (bit leaden and verbose in parts); the plot is identiiable to start with but then divides into multiple strands none of which commands the author's entire attention so it's hard to know what the plot is at times (is it fighting Caine/is it finding out why the fayz has occured/is it trying to un-do the fayz/is it the increasing mutations and beginings of a comic book franchise?) As diverting as Gone could occasionally be I won't be joining the fayz ride - I'll just wait for the movie franchise to come out and catch it on DVD.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gripping read - I couldn't put it down., 6 Sep 2011
By 
N. J. H. (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Gone (Paperback)
If you're after a book that once you've started you just can't put down, then this is the one for you. You'll notice most people reviewing this are saying they read it in a couple of days (at the most) and I have to agree with them - I devoured it.

Sam Temple is just an average 14 year old kid, living with his single mother in a not-so-fantastic house attending a pretty normal school until one day, all of the adults and anyone over the age of fifteen just disappeared. All at the same time. All of them gone. Everyone 14 and under is left to fend for themselves in a world they call the FAYZ. But the need to ration food and keep warm isn't the worst they have to deal with - there are some mutations too. Think of it a little like X-Men. Kids have developed mutant powers like speed, invisibility, super strength and some other more unusual types. Sam is just one of the mutants. But not everyone has developed these abilities and this creates a lot of tension between the groups. The exciting thing is that some mutants are able to determine how strong someones ability is, a bit like the bars on a phone battery. But humans aren't the only ones developing these powers - animals have them too. The world is frightening now.

But some groups want to channel these abilities and take control, the need for power is growing and the bullies of Coates Academy are determined to get it - even if they have to kill for it. However, they are learning all too quickly that once a person reaches the age of 15 they disappear...Sam has 299 hours and 54 minutes to save his town or he'll vanish.

I really loved this and am excited to discover the rest of series, the love interests and variation in characters especially - definitely read this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gone, 8 Mar 2010
This review is from: Gone (Hardcover)
prequel to Hunger and though possible to enjoy the book Hunger, Gone is definately worth reading first as it gives a better idea of what happens within the storyline, very good value for money and would recommend this read
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39 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, 30 Aug 2008
By 
TeensReadToo "Eat. Drink. Read. Be Merrier." (All Over the US & Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Gone (Gone Novels) (Hardcover)
This is my first exposure to Michael Grant's writing, and he totally blew me away. Maybe it was because I am partial to the sci-fi/fantasy genre, but truthfully I don't think that had anything to do with it. This story was just.... WOW!

Imagine sitting in class one day, maybe you are paying attention to your teacher, maybe you are daydreaming about surfing, then all of a sudden your teacher disappears. What would you do?

It just so happens that this very scenario happens to Sam Temple in his history class. It turns out his teacher isn't the only one missing; everyone over the age of thirteen is missing. Not just missing but disappeared. No cell phones, no television, no Internet. Poof, gone!

Sam has been in a horrific experience like this before. Well, maybe not exactly like this. Sam had saved a bunch of kids on a school bus after the driver had a heart attack, good ole' School Bus Sam. Sam was a natural leader, but he didn't feel like it. Now everyone is looking up to him for answers, but all Sam feels is guilt. Guilt because there is a possibility that this was his fault. Sam has this little problem -- he can shoot beams of light and burn people's hands off. Literally. But I guess things like that happen when you live in Fallout Alley.

Thankfully, Sam isn't alone. He has his best friend and surfer brah, Quinn; the genius, Astrid, who Sam has secret feelings for; and the faithful and dependable Edilio.

Of course, in any untamed civilization, there is always a power struggle, those who have it and those who want to take it away. It turns out that Sam isn't the only one who has "powers." When the kids from the private school, Coates Academy, show up, Sam and Astrid realize there is something more going on. It also doesn't help that the kids from Coates and the kids from Perdido don't exactly get along.

Caine from Coates Academy comes in, dazzles everyone with his charm, and takes control of the FAYZ, a.k.a. Fallout Alley Youth Zone. Caine has his own secrets. He has powers of his own. And if he thinks your powers might be a threat to him, he takes care of you one way or another. But when Caine's sinister sidekick, Drake, allows a girl to be beaten to death with a baseball bat for doing a "magic trick," things go from bad to worse.

Caine knows that everyone looks up to Sam as a leader; so begins the battle of good vs. evil. Besides, Caine has his own hidden agenda toward Sam. Oh! And did I mention that when you turn fourteen, you poof, too? So not only does Sam have to save this new world, but he will also be fourteen in a week or so. No worries, though. Yeah, right!

There are so many twists and turns in the plot of GONE that you won't be able to put this book down until it's, well, gone. But don't fret, this is only the beginning of a six-part series. The characters are well-developed. I love when you feel like you really connect with characters, and this was one of those experiences. You not only get to experience Sam's part of the story but the views of many other characters. There is action, suspense, romance, science fiction, and fantasy all rolled into one.

GONE is a spectacular beginning to what I can only hope will be a thrilling series! Amazing!!!

Reviewed by: The Story Siren
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Gone
Gone by Michael Grant (Hardcover - 6 April 2009)
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