Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin and Snowy meet up with Chang Choug-chen
"The Blue Lotus" begins where "Cigars of the Pharaoh" left off, with Tintin and Snowy in India as the guests of the Maharaja of Gaipajama. The evil gang of international drug smugglers had been smashed and all of them are now behind bars except for the mysterious leader, who disappeared over a cliff. A visitor from Shanghai is hit with a dart dipped in Rajaijah juice,...
Published on 16 Nov. 2002

versus
2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An adventure best forgotten
I have to admit that this is probably my least favourite Tintin adventure.

On the positive side, Herge's depiction of the Chinese scenes is beautifully done, with some really superb artwork. He also manages to capture the essence of the colonial age in Shanghai, with its sharp dividing line between wealthy westerners and poor Chinese and its foreign...
Published on 18 Jan. 2010 by birchden


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin and Snowy meet up with Chang Choug-chen, 16 Nov. 2002
By A Customer
"The Blue Lotus" begins where "Cigars of the Pharaoh" left off, with Tintin and Snowy in India as the guests of the Maharaja of Gaipajama. The evil gang of international drug smugglers had been smashed and all of them are now behind bars except for the mysterious leader, who disappeared over a cliff. A visitor from Shanghai is hit with a dart dipped in Rajaijah juice, the poison of madness, which is enough to send our intrepid hero to the Chinese city where his rickshaw runs into Gibson, an occidental who is not looking where he is going and starts beating the rickshaw driver for daring to barge into a white man. Tintin intervenes, calling the man's conduct disgraceful and Gibson vows revenge. The next thing we know Tintin is being shot at every time he turns around. Things become even more mysterious when another bystander is hit with a Rajaijah dart and Tintin embarks on a ship for Bombay only to wake up in the home of Wang Chen-yee, who begins to unravel the mystery for our hero.

This Tintin adventure was first published in Belgium in 1934-35, although the story is actually set in 1931, which was when Japanese troops were first occupying parts of China. Shanghai, the great northern seaport on the Yangtze river, had an International Settlement that served as a trading base for Western nations. Hergé incoprorates several actual events in this narrative, including the blowing-up of the South Manchurian railway, which served as an excuse for further Japanese incursions into China, and led to Japan walking out on the League of Nations.

Of course, it is the Japanese invaders who are after Tintin, who is pretty much on his own for most of this adventure until the Thom(p)sons show up with orders to arrest him (of course the duo don native dress, wanting to avoid causing a scene by walking around dressed in European clothes). The title of the story comes form an opium den that figures prominently in the resoltuion of the tale. "The Blue Lotus" finds Hergé fully committed to providing accurate cultural details in is stories, although this story has the added virtue of being the most "realistic" in terms of portraying current events in a world poised on the brink of war. His drawings of Asian figures can certainly be considered caricatures, but then this is pretty much true of the way he draws everybody in these stories, with the simplistic look of Tintin being the exception that proves the rule.

"The Blue Lotus" is also the adventure in which Tintin meets Chang Choug-chen, a young orphaned Chinese boy our hero saves from drowning. Chang is surprised a white devil would bother to save his life and Tintin haas to explain how not all white men are wicked. The character of Chang is based on Chang Chong-Chen, a young Chinese student who became Hergé's friend in 1934, as is the case with Chang and Tintin. When the Communists took over China the two friends lost touch. Decades later Tintin would race across half the earth to help rescue his friend in "Tintin in Tibet" in 1960. Even though he does not appear in the interim, Hergé makes it clear that Chang is a very special friend to Tintin. "The Blue Lotus" is a first rate Tintin adventure, made all the more special because once World War II began Hergé made a concerted effort to distance his stories from the horrors of the real world. After the war Hergé would deal with East-West tensions on a completely fictional level, making this early adventure of more than passing interest in Hergé's career.
Oh, and in 1981, Georges Remi (a.k.a. Hergé) and Chang Chong-Chen were reunited.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin and Snowy go to Tibet to rescue their friend Chang, 3 Nov. 2002
By A Customer
"The Blue Lotus" begins where "Cigars of the Pharaoh" left off, with Tintin and Snowy in India as the guests of the Maharaja of Gaipajama. The evil gang of international drug smugglers had been smashed and all of them are now behind bars except for the mysterious leader, who disappeared over a cliff. A visitor from Shanghai is hit with a dart dipped in Rajaijah juice, the poison of madness, which is enough to send our interipd hero to the Chinese city where his rickshaw runs into Gibsons, an occiental who is not looking where he is going and starts beating the rickshaw driver for daring to barge into a white man. Tintin intervenes, calling the man's conduct disgraceful and Gibbon vows revenge. The next thing we know Tintin is being shot at every time he turns around. Things become even more mysterious when another bystander is hit with a Rajaijah dart and Tintin embarks on a ship for Bombay only to wake up in the home of Wang Chen-yee, who begins to unravel the mystery for our hero.
This Tintin adventure was first published in Belgium in 1934-35, although the story is actually set in 1931, which was when Japanese troops were first occupying parts of China. Shangai, the great northern seaport on the Yangtze river, had an International Settlement that served as a trading base for Western nations. Hergé incoprorates several actual events in this narrative, including the blowing-up of the South Manchurian railway, which served as an excuse for further Japanese incursions into China, and led to Japan walking out on the League of Nations.
Of course, it is the Japanese invaders who are after Tintin, who is pretty much on his own for most of this adventure until the Thom(p)sons show up with orders to arrest him (of course the duo don native dress, wanting to avoid causing a scene by walking around dressed in European clothes). The title of the story comes form an opium den that figures prominently in the resoltuion of the tale. "The Blue Lotus" finds Hergé fully committed to providing accurate cultural details in is stories, although this story has the added virtue of being the most "realistic" in terms of portraying current events in a world poised on the brink of war. His drawings of Asian figures can certainly be considered caricatures, but then this is pretty much true of the way he draws everybody in these stories, with the simplistic look of Tintin being the exception that proves the rule.
"The Blue Lotus" is also the adventure in which Tintin meets Chang Choug-chen, a young orphaned Chinese boy our hero saves from drowning. Chang is surprised a white devil would bother to save his life and Tintin haas to explain how not all white men are wicked. The character of Chang is based on Chang Chong-Chen,a young Chinese student who became Hergé's friend in 1934, as is the case with Chang and Tintin. When the Communists took over China the two friends lost touch. Decades later Tintin would race across half the earth to help rescue his friend in "Tintin in Tibet" in 1960. Even though he does not appear in the interim, Hergé makes it clear that Chang is a very special friend to Tintin. "The Blue Lotus" is a first rate Tintin adventure, made all the more special because once World War II began Hergé made a concerted effort to distance his stories from the horrors of the real world. After the war Hergé would deal with East-West tensions on a completely fictional level, making this early adventure of more than passing interest in Hergé's career.
Oh, and in 1981, Georges Remi (a.k.a. Hergé) and Chang Chong-Chen were reunited.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Arguably Tintin's first 'classic' adventure, 30 Nov. 2012
By 
Sebastian Palmer "sebuteo" (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
In Tintin's fifth adventure Hergé gives his readers a first small but welcome taste of continuity and grander plot-structuring, starting the story with Tintin in India, and picking up some of the threads of the last adventure, Cigars of the Pharoah. Whilst not quite as fully realised an idea as it will later become, this gently points the way to the later run of two-part adventures.

There's also some continuity in terms of characters, with Rastopopolous (who debuted in the previous adventure) reappearing, and two new characters who will recur later in Tintin's adventures making their entry, namely Dawson (here police chief in the international settlement in Shanghai, and cropping up again later as an arms dealer in The Red Sea Sharks), and Chang, who Tintin will search for in Tibet.

Whilst the artwork is still not Hergé's best, it is improving (although the extensive redraws the series went through by Hergé and his team make this aspect harder to track accurately), as is his storytelling prowess. This said, he falls back on Tintin's war against drug-smuggling again, as a central plot theme, but at least the transparently patched together episodic nature of his adventures in Africa and America is replaced by a more structured narrative.

Hergé' and/or Tintin's relationship to other races and cultures remains a little tricky in places, but he's making improvements. Some black characters shown in frames depicting the League of Nations still resemble antiquated caricatures (not much different from his In The Congo stuff), and his portrayal of the Japanese is quite harsh. But he makes an effort, especially on page 43, to draw attention to the issue of cross-cultural understanding, in what looks now a rather heavy-handedly didactic series of frames in which Tintin and Chang discuss the inaccuracy of each other's cultural stereotypes.

But all in all, the transformation from the ill-drawn, ill-scripted, patchily episodic propaganda of In The Land Of The Soviets to the much higher standards of The Blue Lotus is both massive, remarkable, and more or less complete. So much so in fact that by the time Hergé gets to his fifth instalment in what was to be 24 finished stories (not counting the unfinished Alph-Art), the series from then on would maintain a more less consistent level of excellence: after the sharp climb of the first five books, there would be a steady but gradual shallow slope of improvement.

Certainly a must for any serious Tintin-ophile, and arguably the first 'classic' adventure.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Historical masterpiece comic album, 1 July 2014
By 
Written in 1936 , The Blue Lotus is the sequel to the colourful Cigars of the Pharaoh. In the Cigars of the Pharaoh , Tintin has almost succeeded in smashing an international gang of drug traffickers , managing to capture all of them except the leader who mysteriously crashes over a ravine.
His further investigations lead him to China , then under threat from Japanese agression.
Tintin comes up against a madman infected with a dart that sends the recipient insane , enraged British colonists out for revenge after having been humiliated by Tintin and the Japanese army , with the chief villain of the piece being Japanese businessman Mitsuhirato.
This album drew protest form the Japanese government of the time , and was praised by Chiang Kai Shek , President of the Republic of China.
However, it was banned by China's Communist regime until 1984 , due to some of their own insane Maoist reasoning-and even then was still chopped up and heavily edited.
Other albums having been banned by the Communist dictatorship in China where Tintin in tibet (for recognizing tibetan culture) , Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (for exposing Communism)and Tintin in the Congo ('Colonialist').
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing comic adventure..., 6 Feb. 2006
This review is from: The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
~This story is very well thought out and neatly presented, the artwork is great and characters are drawn accuratly with a lot of detail put in. Most comic books are nowhere near up to this standard. The overall plot is much better than the average Tintin story.
The bad guys mean serious bussiness and Tintin actually gets captured and for a moment you think the young reporter has had it when he's about to get beheaded towards the end.(not to give to much away!)Its only thanks to his friend~~ Chang that he escapes. So not all of this is about Tintin being lucky and having success every time like so many other stories. (ei - Tintin In America)
Enjoyable all the way through and suitable for all ages. In my opinion its the best Tintin book.~
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a tintin lovers favourite, 4 Nov. 2010
This review is from: The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
i loved tintin as a child and read every book available and therefore was delighted when my 8 year old daughter came home from school saying she had found a great book about a boy detective and his dog and could she get it from the library.Sadly the library had no Tintin books so amazon came to the rescue.Hopefully this is just the start of her collection.We have been reading it together as much of the dialogue is very dated and not always politically correct!However it retains its charm and has enough intrigue,twists,turns and humour to keep children and adults alike entertained for a while.Great price for a hardback too!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Curious but enjoyable, 28 Jan. 2010
I've just reread Le Lotus Bleu - yes, in French. I think when I bought it (a long time ago) the English translation hadn't come out. My French has improved since then and I could follow the long speech balloons. I love the way Herge gives everyone a different way of speaking - Mr Wang is always courteously long-winded and complimentary even when tied to a chair by the villains.

This is a very different story from the post-war "classics". The style is different, the lines are thinner, the caricatures more broad. Tintin seems about 12 or 14 (by the end of his career he'd reached about 19). The story is a bit like the ripping yarns of the Far East that were popular from the 1900s to the 30s - ie thrilling melodramas with lots of action. The plot is VERY complicated, and the book is much longer than the later ones. There are many frames containing someone's face and a speech balloon while the character fills the others in on the plot.

Anyone who falls for the simplistic slur that "Herge was racist" should read this book - it will at least make them go "Hmmmm!". Herge is sympathetic to the Chinese characters (who had been villains in novels like the Fu Manchu series). They are all differentiated, down to the rickshaw drivers. But, yes, the Japanese characters are out and out villains. Though Mr Matsuhiratu also speaks like a professor when he is explaining why he just has to perform his wicked deeds.

The art is wonderful. Herge was so good at street scenes. Sometimes his pages look like a film storyboard. And how did he learn to draw movement so brilliantly? The Chinese interiors are good too (did the real Chang do the lettering? I wonder what it says?).

The fictional Chang doesn't appear until about 3/4 through the saga. I'm so glad that Tintin met him again later. (What do you mean, Tintin not a real person?) I'm also glad that young Mr Wang, who's quite a hero early in the book, regains his senses, even though the ending is rather rushed and Herge doesn't give him any more lines to say. But even when mad, he still has a grasp of Chinese philosophy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Blue Lotus, 28 Jan. 2013
By 
Mr. Allan Hillman (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
The Blue Lotus is another Tintin book for the collection - what more can you say other than it represents good value for money
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars He is very happy with them, 12 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
I have managed to buy the entire collection of hardbacks for my husband. He is very happy with them. Great quality.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Blue Lotus is one of my most favoriteTintin adventures!!, 7 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This book is about Tintin and Snowy going to Shanghai after a very mysterious letter from a Japanese man named Mitsuhirato. But danger strikes as Tintin finds out there is and old foe after him. What will happen? Find out when you read the sequel to Cigars of the Pharoah,The Blue Lotus!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin)
The Blue Lotus (The Adventures of Tintin) by Herg (Hardcover - 26 Sept. 2012)
10.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews