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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tintin comes to America, home of gangsters and Indians
I read "Tintin in America" relatively late in my journey through the Adventures of Tintin, which might not be fair since this early work by Hergé certainly pales in comparison to some of our beloved heroes later and greatest adventures (e.g., "Land of Black Gold" or "Explorers on the Moon"). From that perspective you notice that the art is a bit more cartoonish...
Published on 26 Aug 2003 by Lawrance M. Bernabo

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The one where Tintin is lynched
There's not really a whole lot to recommend about one of Tintin's earliest adventures. In terms of plotting, characterisation and artwork, Tintin in America - created in 1931 and completely redrawn for collected colour publication in 1945 - is rather primitive compared to the sophisticated later adventures, the story suffering from no clear single storyline other than...
Published on 24 May 2010 by Keris Nine


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tintin comes to America, home of gangsters and Indians, 26 Aug 2003
By 
Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
I read "Tintin in America" relatively late in my journey through the Adventures of Tintin, which might not be fair since this early work by Hergé certainly pales in comparison to some of our beloved heroes later and greatest adventures (e.g., "Land of Black Gold" or "Explorers on the Moon"). From that perspective you notice that the art is a bit more cartoonish than what comes later but the most important difference is that this is basically Tintin and Snowy on their own. The wonderful cast of colorful supporting characters that end up populating the Tintin universe are not to be seen at this point, which might explain why Snowy "talks" a lot more in this early Tintin adventure than is his habit in later volumes.
While this is not a great Tintin adventure, "Tintin in America" is certainly an interesting one because of the way Hergé presents America to his readers. In a manner that reminds me of Babe's fanciful vision of the big city in "Babe: Pig in the City," Hergé presents the U.S. as half Chicago gangsters and half Wild Wild West cowboys and Indians. Tintin arrives in Chicago to clean up the city ruled by gangster bosses and Al Capone is not happy to see the world famous reporter. Tintin survives so many attempted gangland hits that you lose count of them, and it is a toss up whether there are more last second escapes or scenes where Tintin pulls a gun on a gangster. The perils of Tintin continue even when our hero and his faithful terrier companion make their way out West and become involved with some of the quaint customs of the local natives.
The final word would be that if you have heard people raving about Hergé and Tintin, and then you start at the "beginning" (in terms of what is readily available of the Adventures of Tintin) you might be wondering what all the fuss is about. Do not fear. "Tintin in America" represents the early days when Hergé was still finding his way and learning his craft. This is actually the third Tintin adventure, but "Tintin in the Soviet Union" and "Tintin in the Congo" have been let out of what is now the official canon because of Hergé's take on communism and colonialism. However, the best Tintin adventures are yet to come after this one and the best is very, very good.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The one where Tintin is lynched, 24 May 2010
By 
Keris Nine - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
There's not really a whole lot to recommend about one of Tintin's earliest adventures. In terms of plotting, characterisation and artwork, Tintin in America - created in 1931 and completely redrawn for collected colour publication in 1945 - is rather primitive compared to the sophisticated later adventures, the story suffering from no clear single storyline other than Tintin chasing one particular criminal across America. The book reflects rather its serialised origins where Tintin and Snowy are put through sequences borrowed from every genre of Hollywood filmmaking, from gangster films to Westerns.

Following on from Tintin's run-in with Al Capone's operations in, of all places, the Belgian Congo (in Tintin in the Congo), the news that the fearless reporter is coming to America to continue his crusade against the gangster strikes fear into the hearts of Al Capone and his gangsters, who immediately try to capture and dispose of him the moment he arrives in Chicago. Escaping their clutches, Tintin however soon breaks up their organised crime activities, but has to chase one big-time gangster, Bobby Smiles across half the continent and through Red Indian lands.

There's at least no shortage of incident in Tintin in America, a mixture of crime-fighting, mishaps and adventuring through exotic landscapes that would become a familiar formula in later Tintin books. It gives Hergé the chance to indulge in classic US movie imagery and escapades, with gangsters and Indians, lynch mobs and runaway trains, with Tintin in cowboy gear sitting at a campfire or dressed as a bellboy. Even if all those incidents and imagery are well-worn clichés from Hollywood films of the period, and the artwork isn't quite as refined as it would later become, there is at least some flair in how those sequences are storyboarded, with some terrific larger splash frames.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars After Russia, Africa... then on to America, 17 Nov 2012
By 
Sebastian Palmer "sebuteo" (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
Warning: this review contains spoilers.

This was, if I recollect correctly through the mists of time, the second Tintin book I got, as a child, so I have a certain nostalgic attachment to it. Looking back now it's not amongst the best of the Tintin adventures. But, it being a very early work, that's not so surprising.

Although his main adversary in the adventure ends up being the fictitious Bobby Smiles, Al Capone is the mobster behind the criminal network Tintin is initially pitted against. This follows on from the mention of Al Capone in Tintin in the Congo, these instances being, as far as I know, the only times Hergé refers directly and by actual name to a real person in the Tintin books. As well as taking on the mob the plucky young reporter is embroiled in, amongst other things, an oil discovery, leading to a surreal sequence in which a city springs up instantly around him, literally overnight.

Of course he gets himself into numerous other scrapes - in this early adventure the serial nature of the original story is more apparent than in later, smoother-flowing works - and these scenarios allow him to narrowly escape being killed by Indians, lynched by rednecks, run over by a train, drowned in the bay or turned into tinned meat (is it dog food? I can't recall offhand!) by mobsters, amongst numerous other potentially grisly ends.

I wouldn't recommend this as a starting point - it doesn't hang together or flow as well as later, better Tintin adventures, seeming like a random assemblage of largely unconnected ideas - but for those who know and love Tintin it's an essential chapter the saga. There was much better to come, but this story retains a place in my heart and my collection, both for old times sake, and for its own early Tintin-era charm.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 14 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
A great book which was bought as a gift and was very well received by the intended audience. To say "over the moon" is an understatement.
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4.0 out of 5 stars tin tin, 11 May 2013
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Purchased for male relative who has started a collection of tintin books. I seem to be the only person buying these for him so have told him at two a year (birthday and Christmas) it will take some time to complete collection.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well what can you say about Tintin...., 10 May 2013
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This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
I loved them as a kid and am enjoying buying them for my friends kids. Tintin's moon adventures are still my favourite though.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I Love Tintin, 7 Dec 2011
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This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
This is one cartoon character which doesn't need any review. Every single story is a favourite of mine and I wish they would turn each of that into a motion picture. An excellent addition to my Tintin collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin in America, 1 Jan 2011
This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
Will be buying more Tintin books, they are such good value. Great to see the next generation enjoying these as much as I did.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Still fascinating, 19 Jan 2010
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Mr. D. J. Linnell "francophile" (Northampton, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
I first read this book in French, in France with the book owned by my host 30 years ago with the book already 20 years old. Still a fascinating read of America seen through Herge's eyes, the original read helped me a lot with my French at the time.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic..., 5 Jan 2010
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This review is from: Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) (Paperback)
If you like TinTin you will like this book! It is as good or as bad as all the others! For me, I love those comics - they are simple, easy to read and have a clean sense of humor! Fantastic!
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Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin)
Tintin in America (The Adventures of Tintin) by Georges Remi Hergé (Paperback - 26 Sep 2012)
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