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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential information
Here is vital information about the things we buy every day without thinking. This book points out the hidden dangers in commonly used items, and gives us some very sensible ways to avoid the nasty effects of the things we always thought were safe to use but which actually are not. This book should be on every bookshelf.
Published on 1 May 2012 by Ann C

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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Be careful!
I picked this book up in the library out of idle interest as a professional chemist. But was so appalled by the content I thought I would comment.

The whole book is based on a misunderstanding. The toxicity of a chemical, naturally derived or synthetic, is dependent on the dose. This is best shown thinking of alcohol .....drinking a litre of vodka in one go has...
Published on 22 Dec 2007 by John


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential information, 1 May 2012
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This review is from: What's in this Stuff?: The Essential Guide to What's Really in the Products You Buy in the Supermarket (Paperback)
Here is vital information about the things we buy every day without thinking. This book points out the hidden dangers in commonly used items, and gives us some very sensible ways to avoid the nasty effects of the things we always thought were safe to use but which actually are not. This book should be on every bookshelf.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must have for everyone!!!!, 14 Oct 2006
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D. Vant (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: What's in this Stuff?: The Essential Guide to What's Really in the Products You Buy in the Supermarket (Paperback)
This is a brilliant book detailing how everyday products that we believe are safe are actually causing us and the environment grave problems. Good ideas for natural products which clean just as well too. Highly recommended to anyone who shops in a supermarket!!!.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting book!, 25 Mar 2013
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This review is from: What's in this Stuff?: The Essential Guide to What's Really in the Products You Buy in the Supermarket (Paperback)
"What's In This Stuff?" examines everything from food additives, beauty products and household cleaners, to pharmaceutical products and garden and pet supplies. It also contains a glossary of chemicals and E numbers, a list of the 50 chemicals you should definitely avoid, and suggests non-toxic alternatives to conventional products.
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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Be careful!, 22 Dec 2007
By 
John (Stockport) - See all my reviews
This review is from: What's in this Stuff?: The Essential Guide to What's Really in the Products You Buy in the Supermarket (Paperback)
I picked this book up in the library out of idle interest as a professional chemist. But was so appalled by the content I thought I would comment.

The whole book is based on a misunderstanding. The toxicity of a chemical, naturally derived or synthetic, is dependent on the dose. This is best shown thinking of alcohol .....drinking a litre of vodka in one go has a chance of killing you but drinking one vodka and tonic won't do you any harm. So the toxicity depends upon how much you ingest.

Thus quoting the toxic effects for something at very high exposure is meaningless when considering tiny amounts in perfume, household products or anything else.

An example of this effect is on page 106 in a section on fragrances where it states "Limonene is a carcinogen" but limonene is the substance responsible for the smell of oranges and is present naturally in the rind of oranges and lemons. Does this mean we should be scared of oranges? Clearly not. The carcinogenicity was established by feeding enormous quantities to rats.

Summary: This book is useless and will potentially cause harm to the reader through unnecessary worry and just lead to an increase in the ranks of the worried well.
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