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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rarity Amongst Comics
I've always said (well, to myself anyway) the best comics are always random, the ones you pick up off the shelf and realise they are spectacularly different to what you had imagined. At first I thought this comic was a comedy Sci Fi piece, but as I flicked through the pages I quickly realised it was a gritty, violent and quite sad story.

It features 3 domestic...
Published on 29 Oct 2005 by S. Chiddington

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good LITTLE read
I really enjoyed this comic and found the story line fun and invigorating. This was more or less the first comic in had ever brought rather than borrowed. On that front I was regretful for I thought the comic would last me a week at least but ended up lasting less than a couple of hours. As an artist, I love it. As a reader, I found it limited.
Published 5 months ago by reader jade


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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Rarity Amongst Comics, 29 Oct 2005
By 
This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
I've always said (well, to myself anyway) the best comics are always random, the ones you pick up off the shelf and realise they are spectacularly different to what you had imagined. At first I thought this comic was a comedy Sci Fi piece, but as I flicked through the pages I quickly realised it was a gritty, violent and quite sad story.

It features 3 domestic semi-sentient animals which have been augmented/cyborgised (rather tragically) for a military experiment. But when their usefulness is at an end, the 3 in question(a Dog, Cat and Rabbit who only have each other as family, a bare understanding of speech, humanity or the world around them) try to escape and find 'home', with virtually everyone on their trail.

This very adult and tragic tale is a rarity amongst comics. Whether you're an animal lover or a mech fan, it'll leave a odd taste in your mouth. It'll make you think "Should I be upset by a comic?". And it will make you wonder why you can't get it out of your head.

I promise, you'll get to the last page and just think "...damn".
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars read this then hug your pets!, 1 Jun 2006
This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
This is an astonishing comic book with the most stunning art i have ever seen! There is an almost contradictory beauty in such savage images (eyeball, you'll understand when you see). The story itself is almost a cross between "the incredible journey" and "terminator 2" although it seems crass to decribe it as such. It is ,without question, the most moving comic book i have ever read. PLEASE READ
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful little yarn!, 1 May 2009
This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
A very powerful little graphic novel - well written and expertly illustrated. This is a very short read and I think a lot of its impact comes from its concise format. Well worth the money and sure to leave a lump in your throat - this one brought tears to my eyes!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic, 27 April 2014
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This review is from: We 3 Deluxe Edition HC (Hardcover)
Another classis from the pen of Grant Morrison which covers some very poignant and heart-wrenching adult themes around loyalty and vivisection - not much more I can say other than if you don't already own this comic then put it in your basket and buy it now - you won't be disappointed!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 26 April 2013
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This review is from: We3 (Kindle Edition)
Amazing art work and a real gritty style, loved it and worth every penny. A great idea executed very well
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gem amongst stones., 8 April 2013
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This review is from: We 3 Deluxe Edition HC (Hardcover)
Purely by chance I came across this book, and I'm so glad I did. Having never cried at a film and only one book in my life (I watch/read a LOT), I was extremely surprised at how 'We 3' truly did tug at my heart strings. The artwork is perfect, and along with the dialogue (or mostly lack thereof) they manage to capture the subtleties of the characters - it breaks the boundaries between humans and animals, making you genuinely care for and sympathize with the characters.
Having said that, 'We 3' is by no means a light read. There is a lot of violence, between both animals and humans alike - but it's not unnecessary and makes it all the more powerful when in contrast you see the same characters in vulnerable states.
Overall, I'd say this book is a gritty thing of beauty, and whether you're there for the bloodshed or emotional value, you'll be left with it lingering in your mind.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Goood little graphic-novel, 11 April 2009
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M. Green - See all my reviews
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This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
This is a short, yet satisfying and touching read. Well worth the cost of a few pounds. I strongly reccomend this title.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Proof Pictures Really Are Worth 1,000 Words, 29 Oct 2008
This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
The plot, fast paced if a little predictable, is delivered with some of the best comic book art.

Mixing regular panels with full pages, double pages, multi-screen CCTV and even fragmented, almost 3-D panels, the artist has delivered something most Hollywood blockbuster directors fail to - stunning eye candy that amazes while progressing the action and the storyline.

The art is so good it carries the story like a racehorse galloping to the finish, but immediately rewards a second, third and repeated appraisal at much slower, more appreciative pace. One to enjoy quickly, share with friends and then revisit.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good boy!, 1 Feb 2010
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G. Meldrum (Scotland, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
Possibly the high point of the Grant Morrison / Frank Quitely pairing (it's that or All-Star Superman #10), this is absolutely amazing stuff, up there amongst the greatest treasures modern comics have given us. I know that sounds hyperbolic, but the emotional impact this three-issue mini-series has, combined with the visually astounding work of Quietly, makes it completely unmissable. I'll admit, when I first heard the concept (`Incredible Journey' with cyborg battlesuits) it didn't really prepare me for how much I would love this book. However, I became so wrapped up in this tale of three mechanically-enhanced animal victims and their search for home that the fate of the furry protagonists really mattered to me. In fact, the utterly nightmarish final page of the second issue (the truly terrifying, horrific depiction of Weapon 4, one of Quitely's career masterpieces) genuinely chilled me to the bone, and actually made me think twice about whether I should buy issue #3. Could I bear to see this monstrosity let loose on our heroes? I should have had more faith in Morrison. There's one moment, right when everything seems at its worst for Weapon 1, that we are reminded the animals were taught to work as a team. The next page might just be my favourite in all of comics. Makes me well up just thinking about it! (As Morrison's Batman once said, never underestimate the sentimentality of a Scotsman.)

In short then, this is an absolutely vital collection, beautiful, horrific and touching, all in one. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A powerful and moving parable of humanity, 24 Mar 2011
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This review is from: We3 (Paperback)
This is a remarkable and very moving story. It's been described as 'Terminator' meets 'The Incredible Journey' but that is to miss much of the nuance and power of the book. In a very short span it presents, with the barest minimum of words, a complex arc from madness and perversion through to a tentative restoration of order and justice.

The story is simplicity itself. Three lost pets have been converted into prototype superweapons. An ambitious senator - a very ambitious senator - likes the idea of animate superweapons, but doesn't like the fact that they can talk, so orders them destroyed. And they don't like that, so they escape from their base and go on an increasingly bloody rampage, fighting off every attempt by the military to stop them. The animals seek 'home' and, in an extremely moving moment, find it not as a place, but as a state of mind.

But what's it about? Well, one could look at the surface and say that it's about how weapons / war / etc are bad. All fine and dandy, but most of the violence we see is committed by the 'heroes' against humans, so unless we have a double-standard, that doesn't wash. Or we could say that it's about the good old Frankenstein complex, which it might be at a superficial level, but I believe there is something deeper going on. Remember that the senator doesn't like the animals because they can talk. He wants the weapons to use animals, but in such a way that no-one can feel sympathy for them. Similarly, the idiotic general or colonel or whatever, who sends wave after wave of men to a horrible death, refuses to accept that the animals are more than just machines, and hence he underestimates them always. He even, at one point, complains of the horror of teaching a weapon to talk.

And that is the key. We live in an age where combatants of all hues - military, terrorist, whatever - dehumanise their opponents and dehumanise their fighters. So we get 'collateral damage' instead of 'civilian casualties', and soldiers are viewed as pawns to be manipulated by commanders, rather than people who fight from an act of will. The senator's objection to talking animal superweapons is no different from the carefully sanitised view of conflict presented to us by its managers. Fighters and fighting are, as the book says, essentially amoral, but we can make them moral by the way we treat them. If we treat them as games, then we ourselves become immoral.
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WE3 TP
WE3 TP by Grant Morrison (Paperback - 4 Mar 2014)
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