Customer Reviews


4 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 14-fisted fun!
The truth is, I recycled my old comic collection years ago & never looked back. The only DC series I wanted to read again was Morrison's run on JLA. It's just so FUN, with heaps of OTT action & character insights succinctly provided in just a couple of lines of punchy dialogue. And in addition to the flash-bangs, little character details like the testosterone-fuelled...
Published 7 months ago by Sam Woodward

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't really do them justice
Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Aquaman, and Martian Manhunter: together, they are the Justice League of America. They face a hostile alien super-powered team who appear on Earth to enslave mankind, sentient robots, the army of Heaven, and trickster aliens harnessing cosmic power.

This is Grant Morrison's late `90s run on the JLA and...
Published 21 months ago by Sam Quixote


Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 14-fisted fun!, 6 Feb 2014
By 
Sam Woodward (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: JLA Vol. 1 (Kindle Edition)
The truth is, I recycled my old comic collection years ago & never looked back. The only DC series I wanted to read again was Morrison's run on JLA. It's just so FUN, with heaps of OTT action & character insights succinctly provided in just a couple of lines of punchy dialogue. And in addition to the flash-bangs, little character details like the testosterone-fuelled competitiveness between younger members Green Lantern & Flash lend it some humanity & bring it down to earth a touch. Morrison also gives them all a bit to do. Even poor old Aquaman, who usually sits around doing nothing because let's face it, he's a bit rubbish, really, unless you want some swimming done. Yet here, even he gets involved & has some moments of heroism.

The classic JLA lineup get back together when some alien superheroes turn up on their doorstep. Rather than protecting humanity while our species develops at its own pace, the Hyperclan intervene with the status quo more than Earth's existing heroes ever did. Like irrigating the Sahara Desert, for example. Of course it's a scam to subtly invade the Earth & only our now-maligned classic heroes can save us! A gaping hole in the plot is unconvincingly papered over in a silver-aged superheroics type way but the art is dynamic & so is the story. It's great fun to see the world's mightiest go up against alien equivalents with similar powers.

Then we're introduced to the Woman Of Tomorrow in a wicked twist on a good old-fashioned 'evil genius' storyline ("You mush be this evil genius we keep hearing about!" "I studied evil in Harvard, you oaf!"). This one-episode wonder is far more memorable than the third story, however, which pits the JLA against Guardian Angels & a Demon. Sure, it's in keeping with DC continuity but the subject-matter is unappealing to me, personally & it's mainly a vehicle for introducing a new character. But there's still some great moments, like Flash pointing out that "[Superman] was worried that he couldn't live up to his myth. He's wrestling an angel..."

BTW there's a few little details which require explanation as they must seem bizarre to first-time readers. Prior to JLA, the continuity of the DC universe was tied up in knots because what happened in a characters' monthly title did not impact any crossovers or team titles which they were involved in. Like when Guy Garner quit the JLA in the aftermath of Doomsday but when he got his own title a few weeks later, was shown being chucked out following an argument with Superman. So here, when Superman's powers change along with his costume in his solo title, Morrison writes his new look & abilities into the JLA script without explaining what's happened. Wonder Woman is similarly affected in later volumes, when she is replaced by her own mother for a while (although they're so similar that Steel points out he didn't realise for the first month).

Anyway, Morrison effortlessly combines breakneck action with character development & makes the world's greatest superheroes actually seem super. And intelligent (at least if we gloss over the 'sorry I was uncharacteristically daft for the sake of the plot' moment in the first story). I'm more of a Batman & Dredd fan myself, so OTT superheroics don't usually appeal to me but Morrison does it very well here. And doesn't talk down to his audience.

While I can't get on with his Superman reboot or the All-Star version, I will always have a soft spot for Morrison's run on JLA. The pantheon of demigod-like beings are much more human here than even his human characters are in his Superman run.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great action but has it's flaws., 3 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: JLA TP Vol 01 (JLA Deluxe Editions) (Paperback)
Collecting the 1st 2 major stories of Grant Morrisons JLA run this volume seems The Justice League stocked full of all the 'big' players. Batman, Superman, Wonder woman, the Flash, Martian Manhunter, Aquaman and Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner).

Prior to this run the Justice league was mostly B-lister heroes and interest was waning. Morrisons take is to bring back all the big guns and do huge action adventure stories with intergalatic enemies and threat on a global scale. And in this aim the series succeeds. The foes are epic, the heroes super heroic and the adventures grand. This is a great big scale superhero adventure.

The artwork is superb with some oddities that newer readers may find strange. Superman is sporting his 90s era Mullet, but with all the swashbuckling and dering do going on here that's a minor quibble. The pacing of the story is breakneck speed, this truely feels like a adventure that only the worlds greatest heroes combined could contend with.

The only gripe I have with this book is that between the 1st and 2nd stories obviously a lot happens to the characters that isn;t covered here. Superman suddently pops up as a blue energy based hero with totally different powers and bar a couple of brief mentions it's not really explained. This is pretty jarring to someone who wasn't familiar with the Super-goings on in the 90s.

Overall this a great thrill ride of a book, the artwork is big, bold and colours are strong. The cover gives in good impression of the style found in the volume. As with all 'team up' style comics it suffers a lack of screen time for the individual characters. I would certainly recommend picking this up but you might want to familiarize yourself with some of the characters present before delving in.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great read of the jla in the 90s, 14 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: JLA Vol. 1 (Kindle Edition)
Great artwork and fun stories make this an enjoyable read. Not Morrison's best work, but still very good. Martian Manchester, the flash and green lantern have some of the best parts in the collection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't really do them justice, 16 Dec 2012
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Aquaman, and Martian Manhunter: together, they are the Justice League of America. They face a hostile alien super-powered team who appear on Earth to enslave mankind, sentient robots, the army of Heaven, and trickster aliens harnessing cosmic power.

This is Grant Morrison's late `90s run on the JLA and boy can you tell it's the `90s! Superman's rocking a mullet for the first four issues but afterwards, inexplicably, he becomes all blue and white, unrecognisable as Superman besides the pentagon "S" on his chest. He looks like if Derek Zoolander tried a Superman look. It's such a strange gear shift to have this bizarre looking Superman suddenly appear and no-one commenting on this new costume. Aquaman looks like Ultimate Thor crossed with Captain Hook - his left hand is a golden harpoon! Batman literally has claws which seems like something he wouldn't have because it's impractical and looks like it'd be more suited on Catwoman, while Green Lantern's mask looks to be made out of Lego. Even the lettering has that `90s look, all slanted and sharp.

Morrison has a reputation for writing abstract, weird stories which is totally justified when you read books like "The Filth" and "The Invisibles" but he writes "JLA" straight, so you never feel as if you don't know what's going on. While the stories are definitely grandiose and ambitious enough for this super-powered team, I found the lineup handling these dangers to be less than pleasant to spend time with.

Batman is barely in this book, appearing in the first 4 issues and thereafter making the bare minimum of appearances. "I promised the League I'd be prepared to function in an advisory capacity" he growls at Superman, "That's what I'm doing now", before exiting the story. He's so contemptuous of the JLA! Aquaman too doesn't want to be there, making sure everyone know that at all times. And everyone's mean to Green Lantern - Kyle Rayner - who's fresh from the ranks of the Teen Titans. Rayner's so bullied that he becomes insecure saying things like: "I can't handle this. It's like playing with the Beatles". J'onn J'onzz, the Martian Manhunter, when he's not making Rayner feel inadequate, is the definition of aloof; standing in the background, pupil-less eyes staring stoically ahead, arms crossed. Besides one panel - one! - in this book where he shows what he can do, he contributes so little I kept wondering what he was doing on the team. And Superman and Wonder Woman seem to prefer to work separately and do so most of the time. The only 2 who actually work well as a team are the Flash and Green Lantern. Otherwise, this JLA are a team in name only. They're so uncommitted to this line-up that they actually start holding auditions for new members by issue #5!

But there are plenty of good moments in this book. I really liked Morrison's characterisation of Batman who is cold but impossibly brilliant, constantly being the biggest threat in this group of god-like figures despite having no super-powers. In every story he's included in, he plays the major role, being the first one to figure out what's going on and how best to defeat the challenge, setting up traps and situations ahead of time. Like a brilliant chess grandmaster, he's several moves ahead of everyone else. As a Batman fan, I loved this version of the character - at least when he was around.

I haven't read many Green Lantern books but the stories I have read have had GL make some very mundane creations, swords/guns etc. Morrison's GL constructs are actually imaginative and cool. He comes up with a robotic T-Rex, spaceships, and a manga robot to fight with, and in one instance when all he needs to do is create a cutting device for some rope he crafts an intricately robotic pair of scissors! He also utilises Flash's speed by creating a laser gun powered by a treadmill Flash runs on - genius!

"JLA Vol 1" has some cool storylines but the characters weren't likeable or developed enough for me to fully enjoy the book. The group dynamics put me off as they all seemed awkward and unpleasant around each other, as if they hadn't settled down enough to work as a team but, disappointingly, there was no effort to resolve this. Batman's portrayal made reading this worth it but the lack of character development for Wonder Woman, Martian Manhunter and Aquaman was a big failing as the "JLA" is made up of different personalities and yet half of them seem to be cardboard cutouts, mechanically performing the role of the hero. It definitely felt that Morrison wasn't able to juggle this many disparate characters well enough yet and so the stories tend to feature Superman or Flash or Green Lantern in fully fleshed out roles while the others are left out or underwritten as a result.

"JLA" falls between the good and the bad of Morrison's work. It has it's good moments but is also underwhelming and tedious by turns. Hopefully, like his fantastic run on Batman, the early issues are the worst of the bunch before he finds his feet with the series and it takes off in "Vol 2".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

JLA TP Vol 01 (JLA Deluxe Editions)
JLA TP Vol 01 (JLA Deluxe Editions) by Grant Morrison (Paperback - 11 Oct 2011)
£14.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews