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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superman at his best
Great superman story. Well thought through. The kind of story that makes you wonder, with curiosity; what will happen next!!?! :)
Beautiful state of the art, in how it is drawn, too.
Published 17 months ago by Pierre Eriksson

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story.
Good story, not as good as vol one in my opinion, still I enjoy a new take on an old friend.

Confused as to why this won't download to my i-pad though, when volume 1 did?
Published 21 months ago by DW


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superman at his best, 30 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
Great superman story. Well thought through. The kind of story that makes you wonder, with curiosity; what will happen next!!?! :)
Beautiful state of the art, in how it is drawn, too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good story., 13 Nov 2012
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Good story, not as good as vol one in my opinion, still I enjoy a new take on an old friend.

Confused as to why this won't download to my i-pad though, when volume 1 did?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant interpretation of Superman's early career., 28 Dec 2013
This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
Superman Earth One is one of the best Superman comics I have read, if not the best. While not in regular continuity of the DC Universe, this book felt like a good place to start reading the super books, doing well to bring Superman into the 21st century, delivering much of what the New 52's Superman lacked.

In Superman Earth One volume 2, we follow Clark Kent in his early years. As his new identity of Superman, the world debates whether he is a threat or an ally to the human race, When a new enemy emerges that feeds on any kind of energy, Clark already has enough on his plate with his job at the Daily Planet, his social life and trying to come into terms with his near-immortality. The awesome penmanship of J. Michael Straczynski digs deep into the feelings and emotions of Clark. Clark has deliberately remained emotionally distant from others and tried his best to remain anonymous in order to blend into the background, ashamed that he is not one of us. There is a brief yet beautiful sequence where Clark talks about his childhood cat, which is a very emotional and powerful scene despite its simplicity.

While the story doesn't seem to distinguishable from the mainstream DC continuity (at least pre New 52) there are some interesting differences in this reality that Straczinski utilizes well, such as the inclusion of a Jimmy Olsen who is the complete opposite of how we know him. While usually, he is an incompetent young photographer sucking up to Editor White, he is now an older, better skilled and cooler character entirely, who is superior to Clark instead of his rookie.

Superman Earth One volume 2 was so good that I intend to find the first volume and read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent episode in this Elseworlds series, 12 Oct 2013
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
This is a very well written and illustrated story in this series, this time dealing with both Superman and Clark Kent's finding their place in the world. It is still a divergent path from the Superman baseline, but less-so than the first volume. Here we see Superman coming up against the political limits of his power, as a foreign dictator (are there many left nowadays?) prevents Superman helping some of his people who are in opposition to him; and Perry White continues Clark's education as a writer and journalist. On a personal level, Clark starts to understand and bond with humans, and the `man of steel, woman of Kleenex' problem raises its head. Lois deepens her investigation (or snooping, as old time readers will think of it) into Clark's background, as this volume's villain - the Parasite - takes centre stage. Even the Luthors make an appearance at the end of the volume, so hopefully we may see a third in due course.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful cover and story, 6 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
After the unboxing, I was astonished by how great this comic looked, it's a really nice thing to have in your comic book collection, even if only for the looks.
The story is great too, featuring a new villain and Superman's nemesis Lex Luthor. Fantastic read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Making way for vol 3, 11 Nov 2012
By 
K. G. A. Alavi (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
Good comic. Almost as good as the first book. Great art work good story. The only falling for this is it felt rushed. There were some great ideas in this book. Superman losing his powers for the first time, but I think he should have spent more time being "human", not getting his powers back in a couple of panels. Unfortunately this happened in all the fights in this book. I never liked the Parasite as a top villein, but when he is powered up he looks like Superman's deadliest opponent.

The strongest thing about his is the psychological story. Now that Clark is Superman what does he do next? He has reported his biggest article, stopped an alien threat, and life seems pretty good. Now he has to face the backlash of paranoia from the public of having a god like character among them. What are his motives? What does he want? Superman runs against a dictator should he just kill him and be done with it? What then should he take over world next?

The rest of the book sets up stuff for later, including major Superman villeins. That is the problem this book felt rushed and more of a filler than a stand alone story, which the Earth One line should be. As sequels go a good attempt.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I highly recommend the other books in the series also, 8 July 2014
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This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
A must for anyone who reads graphic novels.
I highly recommend the other books in the series also.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Superbad, 14 Nov 2012
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC (Hardcover)
Bad guy gets caught in a weird machine which zaps him and rather than killing him, warps him into a monster called Parasite. Superman worries about getting involved in developing nations' politics and having sex with a human woman. Then Superman and Parasite fight - guess who wins? That's pretty much the whole book.

There is a super-ton of stuff I didn't like about this book. Probably the worst by far is the dialogue. J. Michael Stracynzski has a tin ear for how people, especially young people, speak. On the first page Perry is talking to Clark who immediately sounds like an annoying dweeb, punctuating Perry's "wise words" soliloquy with feeble attempts at humour. Jimmy Olson thinks a haircut, putting his feet up on his desk and a blog make him cool and utterly fails to convince, while a new character, Clark's sexy neighbour, doesn't sound at all like a semi-real, semi-intelligent woman and more like a nearly 60 year old man trying awkwardly to write dialogue for a twentysomething woman.

And then there's Lois. On a night in, Lois and her boyfriend (unnamed) are sat in front of the TV, Lois is bristling, and they fight. Lois ends the brief argument, dismissing the man with "the only thing you're supposed to do is smile, look good on the couch, don't talk and then leave". Why does she sound like a `20s gangster talking to his moll? Her depiction in the book is devoid of charm - new readers coming to this book will wonder why anyone gave a damn about such an angry, irritating character.

Enter the arbitrary bad guy for this book, Parasite. He's an evil geezer, murdering people left and right, before he even manages to wind up in a government lab, trapping himself in a test chamber, and accidentally blasting himself with experimental stuff, turning him into a monster that looks like he's trying to break the world record for most tennis balls crammed into his mouth. Everything about this guy is uninspired from the lab/test chamber trope instantly turning the guy into a monstrous villain, to his ridiculous appearance, to the motivations behind everything he does, yelling on every page he's on: "power, more power, unlimited power!!!". It would have been just as effective if he'd been saying "villain motivation!" over and over. You still don't care. Also their final battle reads like a Street Fighter 2 fight with a dialogue box in the bottom of each panel indicating how much "power" both combatants have, their power bars decreasing as they trade punches.

The myriad storylines in the book are there to show how Superman becomes the morally upright character he's famous for. At least that's how I think it was supposed to be. Stracynzski muddies the water with his ham-fisted handling of the story strands. Clark moves into a low-rent building filled with low-lives to meet a charming and beautiful young woman, so we get a flashback to Smallville where an embarrassed young Clark winces as Jonathan Kent talks about intimate relations between men and women and how it's going to be very different for him because of who he is. I only mention this because I re-watched it recently but "Mallrats" has a scene where Brodie talks about Superman hypothetically having sex with a human woman, saying the only way would be with a Kryptonite condom. I wondered if Stracynzski would explain this conundrum but instead he just tapers off, leaving the reader uncertain whether Clark would ever be able to have sex with a human woman (or man if he swung that way - hey, this is a re-imagining right?). So why bring up this flashback in the first place if not to resolve it? And why is Jonathan Kent referring to his teenage son as the "Man of Steel"?

There's a limp side story about a junkie that's just crassly sentimental and shoe-horned in for no reason except to make you feel something the writer hasn't earned through his writing, and a weird non-romantic story with his sexy neighbour. Then later he has Superman rather questionably impose himself upon a developing nation's political system, thus altering that country's destiny (for the better - maybe, the liberators still hang onto the guns - but I still think it's not up to Superman to decide these things).

I like the potential that the "Earth One" series has. Geoff Johns' "Batman Earth One" was definitely one of the best comic books I read all year but Stracynzski's a far less talented writer and whose version of "Superman Earth One" is noticeably poorer and uninspired. An alternate take on a familiar character should shed new light and reveal something about that character we didn't know before but this reboot doesn't have anything to distinguish itself from the range of Superman books already out there. It's so bland and pointless, I don't know why DC bothered with this at all. Compared to a superior Superman title like Grant Morrison's "Action Comics", both volumes of "Earth One" are shown up as the weaker efforts they are. And why does Clark look Chinese, Shane Davis?
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Supermeh!, 9 Jun 2013
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The first volume was very much 50/50. The follow-up took a nose drive. The story creates a Clark Kent and Superman that will not seem familiar or likeable to DC comic fans of fans of the movies
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great comic, 27 Dec 2012
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Always loved superman, however most stories are very limited. The bad guy finds his weakness and exploits it etc. Year one is similar is this vain, but somehow the story engages you, and you feel superman my actually loose, it also shows his human emotions and still a great back story to the early days. I would recommend this to anyone who wants to read a decent superman comic. It had me gripped from start to finish, and can't wait to read it again very soon. If you loved this please please make sure you read vol 1 as well.
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Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC
Superman: Earth One Volume 2 HC by J. Michael Straczynski (Hardcover - 13 Nov 2012)
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