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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Gaiman
The whole Sandman series is not only amazing in it's weird characterisations (Death is a funky upbeat lass and Dream is her morose, depressed brother) but it is very cleverly written. Each book could be read on it's own but you really realise Gaiman's genius when you read them all in order and then reread them again. The intricate way the story weaves itself and the...
Published on 27 Feb 2003 by hez

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1 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars i am
it was not that good i was scard a bit but not a lot i rat this 1 star scary but not that scary me i like rilly very scary books
Published 15 months ago by Amazon Customer


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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Gaiman, 27 Feb 2003
The whole Sandman series is not only amazing in it's weird characterisations (Death is a funky upbeat lass and Dream is her morose, depressed brother) but it is very cleverly written. Each book could be read on it's own but you really realise Gaiman's genius when you read them all in order and then reread them again. The intricate way the story weaves itself and the characters around themselves is not something you will find done so well anywhere in the graphic novel genre. There is always a new connection and twist. Gaiman and his wonderfully quirky way of seeing the world is shown best in these works, but for a really accessible and fun introduction you also need to get hold of Good Omens (written with Terry Pratchett). Priceless stuff.
Watch out for references to any and all important literature in the last 400 years, including Shakespeare, who plays a modest role in the Sandman.
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5.0 out of 5 stars keeps getting better, 29 May 2014
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Awesome, and astounding... By all means the series keeps getting better, and in this volume we follow the strange world of Rose Walker... Enjoy, enjoy!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Surreal escapism at it`s best, 30 Mar 2014
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Mind bending brilliance from Neil Gaiman. Vol 2 of the sandman series is cleverly written and thought provoking in a weird surreal kind if way. Strange characters and settings but mind expanding all the more for that oddness. Grim and somehow hopeful all at the same time.
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13 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dark and wonderful, 18 July 2003
This is certainly my favourite of the Sandman series that I have read so far, the others being Preludes and Nocturns, Dream Country, Season of Mists and Brief Lives. In my opinion The Doll's House has one of the better realised story lines, and the way that the different perspectives of the main story, as seen by different characters, blend togther is perfect. It's also the one where I found myself empathising with the characters most, sharing in their losses and triumphs. I have enjoyed all the Sandman books so far, but this one is definitely top of my list so far.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I am angry, Lucien, 1 May 2011
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Sandman: Doll's House (Paperback)
The Sandman has returned to his country of dreams, but his long absence is still showing -- he's gotten his magical items back, but not all of his followers. "The Sandman Vol. 2: The Doll's House" picks up some threads from the first collection of Sandman stories, and while the story is often confusing and scattered, Neil Gaiman's writing is a glittering jewel of sadness, horror and beauty.

Among the current-day stories, we get some Dream backstory. As part of his coming-of-age ritual, a young boy is told of how a beautiful woman fell in love with Lord Kai'ckul, king of the dream realm. And we see a story of a man untouched by Death, and his ups-and-downs over the centuries as he keeps meeting with his Endless friend.

In the present, Dream learns that a dream vortex has appeared. That vortex is Rose Walker, the granddaughter of Unity Kinkaid (who has slept most of her life), who is searching for her imprisoned little brother. She goes to live at a boarding house full of eccentrics, and is taken under the wing of the mysterious Gilbert (who looks a lot like G.K. Chesterton, and is named "Gilbert").

Additionally, some of Dream's creatures have escaped -- the horrifying Corinthian, who is the guest of honor at a serial-killer convention; Brute and Glob, who have made their own "New Sandman" out of a dead superhero; and Fiddler's Green, who is already close to the dream vortex...

"The Sandman Vol. 2: The Doll's House" is a somewhat messy story -- the two "past" stories feel disconnected from the rest of the book, and it takes awhile for some of the subplots to fully flower. Additionally, I was a little confused by the sudden inclusion of a pair of DC superheroes who have been folded into the world of Dreams -- although their story is the beginning of a much larger, more pivotal one.

And as the story winds on, Neil Gaiman's spellbinding style draws you in -- he fills these pages with bloody horror, love, sorrow, and the occasional glimpse of the lonely lives of the Endless. His style that is all glassy edges and lush poetry, and he pops in some moments of ghastliness (the Corinthan finally taking off his glasses, revealing empty sockets lined with teeth) as well as some moments of warmth (Unity's final shared dream with Rose).

Similarly, Gaiman's characters are a mixture of the lovable and the horrifying -- we get to see Morpheus as he has been throughout the centuries, as well as his flaky, devious sibling Desire (whom I desperately want to sock in the mouth) and the ghastly Corinthian. And he spins up the down-to-earth Rose, as well as a motley band of eccentric characters -- the lace-shrouded lesbians and the creepy yuppies spring to mind, as well as the genial Gilbert.

While some parts of it are clunky, "The Sandman Volume 2: The Doll's House" gradually twines together its many subplots, and sets the stage for what is to come.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A strong improvement over the first volume, 15 Aug 2008
By 
A. Whitehead "Werthead" (Colchester, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The second Sandman collection picks up from the last one, with the Sandman continuing the process of restoring the Dreaming to its proper state, and also introduces a whole slew of new characters and storylines that will continue to resonate within the series until its very end.

Rose Walker and her mother travel from the USA to the UK to mee an unknown benefactor who has paid for their trip. The benefactor turns out to be Unity Kincaid, a victim of the sleeping sickness that swept across the world between 1916 and 1989, whilst Morpheus was imprisoned by Burgess. Whilst she was sleeping, Unity was raped by an unknown assailant, and had a baby, who turns out to be Rose's mother. Rose and her mother are stunned by this revelation, but Rose also takes advantage of the financial largesse of her very wealthy grandmother to undertake a search for her brother Jed, who disappeared several years ago.

At the same time, Morpheus has detected the forming of a 'vortex', a dangerous focii of dream-energy that could disrupt the dreams of the entire human race and kill them. Before he can shut down the vortex, which takes the form of a person, he decides to use it as bait to lure out several inhabitants of the Dreaming who fled to the waking world during his imprisonment, such as the thoroughly amoral Brute and Glob, the personified dream-place Fiddler's Green and the Corinthian, created by Morpheus to be the 'ultimate nightmare'. This results in Rose and her family being placed in extreme jeopardy.

Several other stories are also wrapped around this one: we learn why the Sandman's former lover, Nada, was glimpsed in Hell in the opening volume. We learn that his younger brother/sister Desire is plotting something behind his back. We also meet arguably the Sandman's only true human friend, Hob Gadling, from whom the touch of Death was lifted in 1389, making him immortal. Once a century Hob and Dream meet at the same pub and compare notes on how their lives have unfolded over the past century. This story, Men of Good Fortune, is a stunning piece of work and one of the seminal chapters of The Sandman (alongside the likes of The Sound of Her Wings from the first collection and the forthcoming Midsummer Night's Dream, Three Septembers and a January, The Dream of a Thousand Cats and Ramadan). It also introduces Will Shakespeare, whose amazing writing skills are revealed to be the result of a pact made with Dream, in return for which Shakespeare agrees to pen two special plays for Dream. But more on them when they appear.

The Doll's House represents a quantum leap forward in Neil Gaiman's writing and storytelling abilities. So many storylines revisited in future stories are set up it's pretty breathtaking, from linking this version of the Sandman to the previous DC one (an ineffective, slightly bumbling human crime-fighter called Hector Hall) to the establishing of numerous characters we will meet again later (such as Lyta Hall) and the establishing of several new regular characters, such as Matthew, Death's new raven, and Fiddler's Green. It also features one of Gaiman's most effective moments of horror, with a convention for serial killers (inspired by the World Fantasy Conventions of the mid-1980s) giving rise to moments of both disgust and jet-black humour (panels on deconstructing the stereotypes of female serial killers or how to make money from your hobby). There's also some nice tributes to other comics: as well as the 1970s version of The Sandman we also get a pastiche of Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland strips. As well as the obvious nod to Shakespeare we also get to meet Christopher Marlowe (who is dismissive of Shakespeare's first play, Henry VI, whilst his own masterwork Faustus is getting vast amounts of acclaim).

We also get some more clues as to what The Sandman is about. The legend of Nada shows that the Sandman has made some mistakes in his past and he needs to correct them, whilst Men of Good Fortune shows that the post-imprisonment Sandman is a slightly warmer person than before. A century spent alone has given him the chance to reflect on things and it's interesting seeing his cold, heartless side giving way more easily than before. The story ends with Dream confronting Desire and the immediate crisis solved...but Lyta Hall is living in mortal fear of what Dream told her (read and find out), which sets up events much later in the series.

The Doll's House (****) is a radical improvement on the first Sandman collection, Preludes and Nocturnes, and gives the series a sense of purpose and direction. With the story Men of Good Fortune Gaiman's writing reaches a strong new level of maturity and intelligence, whilst Collectors may be among the most disturbing comics ever created.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I love it, 9 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Sandman TP Vol 02 The Dolls House New Ed (Sandman New Editions) (Paperback)
Can't wait to get the next one
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A suitable homage to Alan Moore, 7 Sep 2006
By 
Mr. A. Hoang "my REAL wall" (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
After being a little disappointed with Gaiman's opening gambit, Preludes and Nocturns I thought that Neil Gaiman was forever going to be in the shadow of Alan Moore, trying desperately to produce a story of the majesty of Swamp Thing. With this story, Gaiman finally comes to maturity in his storytelling, combining magic and dreams with murder and horror and finally reaches the peak he's been looking for. The beauty of the Dolls House is it works perfectly as a standalone novel but even better if read as a sequel to Swamp Thing. My advice? Read Swamp Thing first if you've not already read it, then take this on. It will be worth the wait.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buff, 10 July 2014
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Buff
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A decent second volume, 5 Jan 2014
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While not as great as vol.1 it makes to fill in some gaps in the world of the Sandman and leave you wanting to know more about the Endless.
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Sandman TP Vol 02 The Dolls House New Ed (Sandman New Editions)
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