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5.0 out of 5 stars It will not dissapoint you - a true pleasure to read
‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’ is possibly one of the most influential and prominent Superman tales written of the character, arguably setting the stage for later 90s comics. The particular volume I’m reviewing contains three individual stories written by Alan Moore, which will be reviewed separately below and followed by a general...
Published 17 days ago by Clay Haase

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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good-bye Superman, we'll miss you!
In 1985, DC Comics revamped their comics, getting rid of old confusing storylines, making costumes less silly, plot lines more realistic and consistent, and eliminating ridiculous ideas (like Super powered animal pets). This book contains the last 2 issues of the old Superman, Action Comics 583 and Superman 423.
As such, the story is an imaginary ending for the old...
Published on 9 Sep 2003 by Amazon Customer


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5.0 out of 5 stars It will not dissapoint you - a true pleasure to read, 30 Aug 2014
This review is from: Superman Whatever Happened To Man Of Tomorrow TP (Superman (DC Comics)) (Paperback)
‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’ is possibly one of the most influential and prominent Superman tales written of the character, arguably setting the stage for later 90s comics. The particular volume I’m reviewing contains three individual stories written by Alan Moore, which will be reviewed separately below and followed by a general conclusion about the volume in itself with a final classification.

Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’, is an imaginary story close to the pre-Crisis Superman mythos. In this story, the Man of Steel finds himself in a situation where he has defeated all his major enemies and seems to be hardly needed except in the case of natural disasters. Of course, this peace does not last long, which leads to the main events of the comic. The story takes place in 1997, where Lois Lane Eliot, former reporter of The Daily Planet agrees o an interview with the Planet on the tenth anniversary of the disappearance and presumed death of Superman. With Lois now married to someone else, Lois starts retelling how the events that led to the disappearance of Superman started.

With things going beautifully, it is a time of peace for the world and Superman. They go so well, in fact, that it seems like nothing can go wrong now. Until, of course, they do. One by one, old adversaries of Superman start appearing deadlier than ever, and in some cases even joke villains appear more homicidal than ever. Bizarro appears as a homicidal and suicidal character that Superman is forced to deal with, Superman’s identity is revealed… everything seems to go wrong, but this is only the beginning of the nightmare (as, if the joke villains are deadly, how are the deadliest of Superman’s foes?)

It is when Superman engages in his final battle that he realizes that there is another power at work, so sinister that he can’t even hope to defeat it, and so powerful that it makes the difference between he and humans seem minuscule. His only clue is an object delivered from the future by the Legion of Super-Heroes, yet even if he can survive, Superman will be dead one way or another.

The plot is at the same time both very easy to read because of the good structure and development of the story, and hard because of the many character deaths and tense moments. The ending, though giving hope, is quite heartbreaking and open-ended. The whole story stays in your mind long after finishing it, and is truly entertaining to read. It is an absolutely brilliant work by Moore, who seems to have a talent for getting these sort of reactions from the audience. At times nightmarish and at others heartbreaking, ‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’ is quite dark, but a brilliant ending for the Silver Age Man of Steel. This individual story deserves 5 out of 5 stars, even if the art seems lacking and mildly strange by today’s standards.

The Jungle Line (Crossover of Superman and Swamp Thing)

Following directly ‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’, ‘The Jungle Line’ seemed a bit underwhelming. In this comic within the same volume, Superman gets sick by exposure to the sample of a virus from Krypton that crashed on earth after so many years, and desperately searches for a cure. Once he can’t find any and he realises that he’s dying, he drives off into the mountains to pass away alone in order to avoid hurting someone in the hallucinations the virus provokes. Of course, he runs into no other than Swamp Thing, who, unknown to Clark, heals him.

This is practically all the plot of this individual issue, and though it was entertaining to read, it seemed a bit lacking in the story department. This probably seems this way because of following directly ‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’, and it was a bit disappointing in the sense that it seemed to run short. The idea of Clark being healed unknowingly by Swamp Thing seemed like too much of a deus ex machine for me to be able to fully enjoy. Don’t get me wrong though, it was definitely an entertaining read, and wasn’t boring at all to read. Not as enjoyable as the previous story, but not disappointing in a disastrous way. I’d give it 3 stars because of this, as it is entertaining, but nothing memorable.

For the Man Who Has Everything

It was from this story which the later Justice League Unlimited cartoon was adapted, and it features Batman, Robin (Jason Todd), and Wonder Woman travelling to the Fortress of Solitude to wish Superman a happy birthday. When they arrive they find Superman is the victim of a plant-like organism called the Black Mercy, which has attatched itself to him, and is keeping him in a coma-like state that seems to Superman like a dream world, which shows his fondest wish as a reality.

Soon, and after showing in detail what Superman’s dream world is like, they find that the villain behind this is the intergalactic warlord Mongul, seemingly impossibly formidable with the fighting abilities of Batman or Wonder Woman, and Superman’s invulnerability and strength.

I found this story really enjoyable to enjoy, and definitely worthy of Alan Moore. The very idea at its core, that something we fondly wish could become true, is mesmerising and taken to the best ability in this comic. Perhaps it is because Superman’s is shown in the comic that the story becomes so entrancing. After all, what if someone like the Man of Steel could ‘achieve’ their deepest wish, even if in a dream state? What would the character decide to do, and what does this reveal about the character itself? The combination of the storytelling and development was something which I definitely enjoy of this comic, as well as how it didn’t take itself too serious. The participation of Jason Todd was also really good, doing something really smart which ended up saving the day. This story definitely deserves 5 out of 5 stars, as well as the highest rating.

Conclusion

Overall, I really enjoyed both reading and purchasing this comic, even if it might seem as only relevant to those only interested in the history of the character of Superman and comics in general. All stories, even if to different degrees, are interesting in a way that makes the reader ignore the different art style (which is personally one of the things that typically hinders me the most when reading older comics). They are very well written and structured, the characters appearing being handled beautifully whilst answering and dealing with some deeper questions at the same time.

I give the ‘Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow’ volume the highest rating, with a strong recommendation to buy. It will not disappoint you, and is absolutely fantastic in the best of ways. A true pleasure to read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Class act, 1 Oct 2013
By 
Roy Riley (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Superman Whatever Happened To Man Of Tomorrow TP (Superman (DC Comics)) (Paperback)
Well written stories and quality art. There is a similar graphic novel called Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? that is also worth a look.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good-bye Superman, we'll miss you!, 9 Sep 2003
In 1985, DC Comics revamped their comics, getting rid of old confusing storylines, making costumes less silly, plot lines more realistic and consistent, and eliminating ridiculous ideas (like Super powered animal pets). This book contains the last 2 issues of the old Superman, Action Comics 583 and Superman 423.
As such, the story is an imaginary ending for the old Superman story, a way of tying up loose ends and giving it a final conclusion. You have Superman under seige, all his worst enemies changing from annoying and colourful into crazed killers. The 30th Century Legion of heroes sends him a final farewell, hinting that SUperman's demise is near. He gathers his closest friends and prepares for the end at his fortress of solitude...
The story is a little silly compared to the modern take on the mythos, but it is a good way of saying good bye to the silver age and allowing us to move on to a newer and fresher superman, as realised in two trade paper backs, The Man of Steel volumes 1 and 2 by John Byrne. I enjoyed its sentimental farewell message but it is hardly a must have.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Temporarily the end, 14 Sep 2004
By 
J. R. Kerr "raekerr" (Livingston, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The only thing that ever put me off this book was the price, a bit steep for what is after all simply reprints of two standard american DC comics. This book is poor value compared to some of the massive reprint volumes of classic comics available, and there is no reason why this story could not have been added to "The DC universe stories of Alan Moore" paperback. Once you have stopped being a miser like me and bought the thing though, you will be very glad you did.
Though touted as the end of the old superman mythos, in fact this is really only a postscript to the wholesale stripping of the myth that DC had aready undertaken a year earlier with the Crisis storyline. Most of Supermans increasing bizzare supporting cast had been swept away, reducing substantially the number of characters Moore could play with. Whilst leaving some sections of the story feeling oddly unerpopulated, this does allow Moore to include all the remaining players without seeming forced. The story itself is beautifully written, with fairly shocking elements of realism suddenly rearing up amoungst the nostalgia, such as the perviously ignored fact of just how Krypto would actually use his teeth for example.
Fortunately most writers realised what a hideous waste it was to have wiped out 90% of the fictional universe for the sake of continuity between impossible figures, and Krypto et all eventually were reintroduced albeit in an upgraded fashion. Moore therefore does have the distinction to have handled these classic models for the last time with remarkable care and affection.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure class., 17 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This is, simply put, the best Superman story ever told. Originally published in the last issues of SUPERMAN and ACTION COMICS before the sweeping changes of post-crisis revisionist continuity, it presents itself as exactly that: the last Superman story. All the classic characters from the silver-age Superman mythos are here as the original superhero faces his greatest ever challenge. The details of the plot and it's outcome I won't mention. What is so stunning about this story is the air of finality that Moore imbues the story with, the tangible sense of witnessing the end of a legend. And I'd hardly ever read Superman before this one, and generally don't like superhero comics, so don't think this is just gushy fanboy nonsense. The lovely Curt Swan / George Perez art doesn't hurt either. Very much worth a read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Really good, but too short, 30 May 2013
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This review is from: Superman Whatever Happened To Man Of Tomorrow TP (Superman (DC Comics)) (Paperback)
Like the headlining says: It's really good, but short. Sure, you get some other stories other than the title story but I would have prefered it to have been longer.
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3 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointed, 3 Dec 2001
By A Customer
Never being a huge fan of Superman, i was drawn to the book with excpectations of what Alan Moore could bring to a character who has always been so morally un-ambigous..I was also lead to believe that i would not need a vast knowledge of the complete Superman universe, i was very, very wrong..i was equally disappointed with Moore,as a relative Superman novice i may have missed something but, for someone who turned the superhero genre upside down with Watchmen this is rather un-adventurous..the odd plot hole annoyed me too..
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alan Moore is the best ever Comic author bar none .., 15 Jun 2001
By A Customer
... and this is probably the best ever Superman story. Do you need to be told about "Watchmen"? (only the best trade paperback ever!) If only DC had had the guts to sign Moore up as the main Superman author. If you'd like to see what he might have done with the character, check out the "Supreme" comics from Awesome Entertainment; they are also the best Superman stories you'll ever see. Moore wrote a couple of other Superman stories which are well worth seeking out. You should also check out his current work for ABC (America's Best Comics).. collected in trade paperbacks "Top Ten", "Tom Strong" and "Promethea", all available right here on Amazon!
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