Customer Reviews


39 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (8)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Morrison ties in the 1950s continuity and Bat-Mite!
This volume reprints Batman #676-683 and DC Universe #0. It appears to continue from the preceding volume, so this story might be confusing if you haven't read The Black Glove (which I haven't). On the other hand, as this is Grant Morrison, it might just be confusing for the sake of it. Anyway, Batman appears to be infatuated with yet another female, Jezebel Jet, while...
Published on 24 Mar 2012 by No More Mr. Mice Guy

versus
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A just middling Batman storyline
I dont think this is a love it or hate it deal this comic, it couldnt really provoke those sorts of strong emotions but it is an alright read. So it is a "just middling" or "just OK" storyline, it has its pros and cons.

The artwork on the other hand is amazing, I really like the way that Batman is drawn and I think the Joker is here depicted in a way which is...
Published on 1 Feb 2011 by Lark


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Morrison ties in the 1950s continuity and Bat-Mite!, 24 Mar 2012
By 
No More Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Batman R.I.P. (Paperback)
This volume reprints Batman #676-683 and DC Universe #0. It appears to continue from the preceding volume, so this story might be confusing if you haven't read The Black Glove (which I haven't). On the other hand, as this is Grant Morrison, it might just be confusing for the sake of it. Anyway, Batman appears to be infatuated with yet another female, Jezebel Jet, while under psychological and physical attack from the Black Glove organisation. He is captured, drugged, and released onto the streets of Gotham while under the influence. He appears to hallucinate the presence of Bat-Mite (referred to occasionally as `might' - a typo or a message?) and starts to `remember' some 1950s adventures. It all apparently turns out to be part of a psychological defence mechanism, and we get to see some interesting back-story of his early training, while Robin, Nightwing and friends take care of the enemy henchmen. It all climaxes with the Joker doing what he does best, and Talia al' Ghul demonstrating that diplomatic passports don't work against angry wives... It is a sometimes confusing story, as I have said, but if you persevere, you might work it out (though you can never tell with Grant Morrison if you are supposed to). There is a second, two-part story, which takes place within the Final Crisis, and explains what Batman was doing during his capture and his escape and final confrontation with Darkseid. This might be worth five stars if I thought I followed it correctly, and if I had read the preceding volume, I might have. But then again, if I had, I might have reduced the score to three... This volume is definitely a personal experience.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review of Morrison's complete run on Batman., 3 Nov 2013
By 
Jay (West Mids) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman R.I.P (Paperback)
There's no mainstream superhero character whose portrayal causes as much furore amongst comic book readers than Batman. No other hero has as many varied 'takes on' or as many opinions amongst his fans of how he should be written. The work Scott Snyder is currently doing with the character is for many the kind of story lines that they feel our hero should be finding himself in: gritty, urban, yet imaginative and mysterious - hence, the current run's success. What's important to remember though is in a 70+ year history the Bat-Man has had many incarnations and riffs on how he is portrayed; both on page and screen.
There are a number of Batman's that are burned deeply in the collective psyche and to say that there's a correct one is to miss the point. For some Batman will always be the goofy take seen in the 1960's TV show and for others the brooding and 'realistic' take in Frank Miller's 'Dark Knight Returns' and 'Batman - Year One', will always be the blueprint to work from. And that seems to be the prevalent attitude nowadays when a Batman comic is written: is he believable? We only have to look at Nolan's trio of films to see where the current zeitgeist is - you can leave all the larger than life goings on to Superman, Green Lantern and The Flash.
What's forgotten, though, is no matter what you do with him there is a weirdness and preposterousness that runs through Batman as much as any other mainstream DC hero. It's this, that I believe, Grant Morrison understands implicitly throughout his run. Look at the most famous rogues gallery in comics: Joker, Penguin, Riddler, pantomime villains, all. And when we start looking at second tier villains like Killer Croc and Clayface we are hardly in the realms of the real.
It was high-time Batman was taken somewhere else and certain aspects of his large and varied history was uncovered, re-discovered and brought to the page. Yes, Morrison's run is typically Morrison with all the mind bending, surreality and, there's no denying it, confusion that you come to expect from the writer. Yes, you may have to stick with whole run before certain things make sense (if they ever do) and you may have to read it all twice - but is this such a bad thing? Let's be honest, how many more cliched images of the character, standing atop a 19th century building, looking down on the city with the rain pouring and a lightning flash in the sky, can we stomach? Visually and narratively Batman needed a shot in the arm.
One read of Morrison's non-fiction book on superheroes tells you how much he loves this genre and he writes for those readers of his age and many others whose tastes are pre-'Watchmen': larger than life characters having larger than life adventures, but with a modern sensibility and in his own idiosyncratic style. Like it or lump it, that's what he did with Batman. Hat's off to Morrison for doing it and a thankful nod to DC for letting him.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars it's good not amazing, 23 Jun 2013
This review is from: Batman R.I.P (Paperback)
this story is good but it isn't absolutely wonderful. it won't be able to rival the likes of year one or the dark knight returns. there are no major events like the death of robin or bane breaking batman for the 100th time. although it comes from the guy who created classics such as zenith and the invisibles this isn't grant Morrison's finest work. but it's above average by the fact its so damm strange. its a cross between a Morrison epic and a twisted version of alice in wonderland. after he's drugged batman enters his own fantasy world were he were's a multi colour'd bat suit and takes advice from a bat mite. before he was drugged he was chasing the conspiracy black glove and he finishes the
job when he awakes from his dream. its not amazing but well worth a read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 24 Sep 2011
An exciting and rewarding read. The storyline is complex and intriguing, giving a really good look into the psyche of Bruce Wayne. If you haven't read Batman & Son and Black Glove the storyline may be somewhat confusing as this is the final part of a long saga that Morrison has crafted carefully and subtly over a number of years. Tony Daniel's art is powerful and suitable for the feel of the story.

This comic should be in the collection of every Batman fan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars massively under-rated, 25 July 2012
By 
This review is from: Batman R.I.P. (Paperback)
wow. Morrison, a genius in his own right has managed to craft a tale that makes 70 years of batman all fit into a 15 year career. It's fantastic and makes you believe the silver age was all part of Morrison's epic, defining saga. It is recommended you read The Black Casebook and Batman and Son and Batman the black glove prior to this (in said order) as without this, you will be confused. If you are patient and slightly intelligent, you will enjoy this clever tale that changes everything you thought you knew about the Batman, and the limitations of story telling.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars great, 7 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman: R.I.P. (Kindle Edition)
Great work ! Great art, great story telling - batman back to what he should be.

Would recommend to all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars RIP Batman, 30 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman R.I.P (Paperback)
Liked this story. But I was disadvantaged as I did not read the Black Glove story which preceded this one. I will read the collected volume soon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Dark Knight at his Darkest!Macabre and Brilliant!, 31 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman R.I.P. (Paperback)
If you love insane artwork and stories to match,then and if you are a Batfan,you have to get a copy of this graphic novel.
The Joker artwork is fantastic and scary,its all in here Murder and Mayhem at its best!
I would love to see DC give this the same treatment as Dark Knight Returns and put it out on dvd.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grant Morrison, take a bow!, 5 Jun 2009
By 
Mr. C. B. Pickles "Thunarr" (Liversedge, West Yorkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This storyline has been building for a while. Morrison has been working hard on integrating all the Batman stories ever written into one narrative, and has succeeded brilliantly, even managing to include the weird 1950's SF stuff by explaining it away as an hallucination brought on by a sensory deprivation experiment.

This is not linear storytelling. This is a challenging (but very rewarding) read. The story does become fractured, but that fits perfectly with the context of The Black Glove taking Batman apart at a psychological level. Be prepared to have to read this several times to pick up on all of the threads. You'll also have to be prepared to read it all in one go, since as with the majority of Morrison's best work, the devil is indeed in the details.

If you want a traditional Batman tale, this is definitely not for you. You'll probably hate it (as many of the reviewers here seem to) if you just want a comic book action movie featuring Batman. If you're prepared for a wild, insane ride through Batman's biggest challenge so far (well... until The Omega Effect, anyway), you'll enjoy this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A just middling Batman storyline, 1 Feb 2011
By 
Lark (North Coast of Ireland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
I dont think this is a love it or hate it deal this comic, it couldnt really provoke those sorts of strong emotions but it is an alright read. So it is a "just middling" or "just OK" storyline, it has its pros and cons.

The artwork on the other hand is amazing, I really like the way that Batman is drawn and I think the Joker is here depicted in a way which is simultaneously annoyingly akin to some of the costumed incarnations of Goth Superstar Maryln Mason but also as frightening as the Joker has ever been (including the latest incarnation in Dark Knight).

The pros in the storyline include reflections on Bruce Wayne's personal mission to perfect himself in mind, body and spirit (I really appreciated this, as a long time fan this often is over written by his crime fighting cause), there are lots of elements included here from the earliest days of Batman to the more contemporary comic strips.

The artists and authors also use flashbacks and memory storyboards to full effect which prove absorbing and you wind up feeling like you could be participating in a hallucination or mind bending trip along with Batman, it takes real talent to achieve that sort of non-linear effect.

However, this is also one of the cons, upon finishing the comic you have a sort of "what just went on there?" feeling and rereading it its not that very enlightening on a second time around. You could reach one conclusion but you could as easily reach another.

Superficially the story is one of an international criminal cabal of the uber rich who conspire to break and kill The Batman for sport, so far, so done before, there are elements of betrayal by a lover, messing with Batman's head with both drugs and psychological conditioning, likewise that's been done before, and they finally include The Joker who turns homicidal on them and crazy, nothing new there then. So given that all this has a familiar ring to it I kind of found it hard to treat it as plausible that this could possibly be the end of Batman or that it would even be a major challenge. This isnt the first encounter that Batman has had with the principle villain so I found the idea of implanting a psychological que to a breakdown unconvincing too. Also it seemed like every man and his dog was aware of both the location of the Batcave and that Batman was Bruce Wayne.

So I can say that I liked it but it was just OK, it is also the platform from which later storylines featuring a sort of "Team Batman" as groups and groups of superheroes are drawn to Gotham to share the crime fighting effort. I would recommend this mainly to fans of Batman, although a general reader could like it too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Batman R.I.P
Batman R.I.P by Grant Morrison (Paperback - 16 Jun 2010)
10.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews