Customer Reviews


163 Reviews
5 star:
 (110)
4 star:
 (32)
3 star:
 (9)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


73 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A perfect synopsis of the Batman/Joker relationship
I'm not sure where this story is supposed to fit in the greater Batman legend, but it pretty well sums up the relationship between Batman and the Joker, as well as providing some insights into their origins.
As usual, the Joker has escaped and gone on the rampage, but this time he has decided to take revenge on all the key characters that he believes have caused his...
Published on 1 Mar 2004 by C. Verspeak

versus
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You're Killing Me!
Many plaudits have been thrown at Alan Moore's take on The Joker's backstory and I can see why. What Moore does well is to demonstrate that both Batman and The Joker have suffered similar tragedy but channelled their emotions differently. Where as Batman uses his parents death as a means to drive his desire to protect (made easier through the financial and loving support...
Published on 5 Oct 2009 by Tubby


‹ Previous | 1 217 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

73 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A perfect synopsis of the Batman/Joker relationship, 1 Mar 2004
By 
C. Verspeak "f*" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Batman: Killing Joke (Paperback)
I'm not sure where this story is supposed to fit in the greater Batman legend, but it pretty well sums up the relationship between Batman and the Joker, as well as providing some insights into their origins.
As usual, the Joker has escaped and gone on the rampage, but this time he has decided to take revenge on all the key characters that he believes have caused his suffering - the Gordons and Batman.
His scheme is diabolical - this is one of the ugliest Batman stories I have ever read - and violent. His method of revenge is really sickening and will probably leave you hoping for some severe punishment to be delivered by the end of the book.
And it is - Batman is at his most savage when he catches up with Joker. But the flashbacks to the Joker's past, beautifully rendered, may in turn have you feeling some sympathy for a man who just wanted to take care of his family and ended up disfigured and insane.
This book is about twisted fate and redemption. Both Batman and the Joker are victims of events beyond their control and now must live with the consequences.
Buy this for great art and one of the most thought-provoking stories in comics.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive Joker story?, 24 Dec 2010
By 
The Killing Joke is a strange one. When I first read it a few years ago I wasn't that crazy about it, I liked the artwork and some of the ideas but not the whole book. Reading it a second time I liked it a little bit more, I had originally been somewhat averse to a Joker origin story, I thought it was unneccessary and maybe it still is but at least Moore gives us enough space so that it's possible for everything we learned about the Joker to be just going on inside his head, something which was also used effectively in the recent summer blockbuster The Dark Knight. Tim Burton also took a lot from this comic when he created his first Batman film back in 1989, apparently it's his favorite comic of all tme.

The story is about the nature of Joker and Batman's relationship and also about them as individual people, the Joker more-so than Batman. He's almost a sympathetic character but not quite. His plan is to subject Gordon to such an intense and unbearable experience that he will lose his mind and therefore be like the Joker, which in turn might give Batman a better understanding of why the Joker is the way he is. Complicated? It is, deceivingly so. Check it out and see what you think, just don't expect to like it or to fully understand it on your first read-through, unless you read comics solely for the artwork, then you should love it from the outset.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Jokers Killing Joke!, 17 Nov 2013
By 
Timelord007 (The Eccentric Wanderer) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Batman The Killing Joke Special Ed HC (Hardcover)
The Killing Joke (Hardcover).
Author: Alan Moore.
Illustrations: Brian Bolland.

Review.
The Killing Joke is a very bleak & at time's quite a disturbing story by Alan Moore with illustrations by Brian Bolland that also has hints of a Greek Tragedy running through the story.

The Joker having escaped Arkham Asylum kidnaps Commissioner Jim Gordon who along with Batman he blames them both for his resurrection as the clown prince of crime The Joker.

Caging Gordon in the park & stripping him naked he trys to break his sanity reducing him to endure some traumatic emotional events.

Recently the Joker Paralysed Gordons Daughter Barbara whom was Batgirl at the time until the joker shot her in the back & unmasked her.

knowing her father is Commissioner Gordon he shows Gordon photos of his Daughters pain & suffering who is now a paraplegic due to the Jokers insane madness.

Meanwhile the novel delves into flashbacks of the Jokers past, His life as a engineer in a chemical plant & amateur stand up comic who is unfunny on stage & cant seem to catch a break.

We also learn he has a wife Jeannie who is pregnant & to to earn money for his soon to be new family he unwittingly helps two criminals walk through the plant to rob the card shop next door.

He is given a Red Hood to wear as the criminal's intend to frame the engineer for the robbery but has second thoughts during the planning stage when he hears the cops discuss the engineers wifes tragic death due to a household accident but is now unable to back out as the robbers force him to help them.

Soon a shootout with the cops insures lead by Commisioner Gordon as the criminals are shot & killed the engineer runs to escape but a confrontation with the Dark Knight Batman ensures.

The engineer escapes through a chemical hatch waste pipe were the chemicals inside bleach his skin white, Turn his Lips red & hair Green.

This disfigurement & the events of his wife & unborn childs death sends him insane becoming reborn as the Joker.

Batman is at his most violent in this story as he seeks to track down & rescue Commissioner Gordon, Confront the Joker & end his reign of terror on Gotham for good.

This story mirror images the two characters of Batman & The Joker two sides of the same coin of whom both have suffered at the fate of tragedy & death but as one took to fighting crime the other chose insanity, Crime & Terror.

The final confrontation with Batman & the Joker at the funhouse is tense & gripping as the Joker taunts the Dark Knight that "It takes just one day to change a mans life" as Batman must use his cunning skills to escape the Jokers deadly traps lurking about inside the funhouse.

After a final fight between Batman & the Joker, Batman eventually gains the upper hand managing to apprehend the Joker as Batman tells him that one day there confrontations may lead too one of them dying.

This is the only part of the graphic novel i find a little strange is Batman's offer to help the Joker to seek a path redemption but as the Joker tells Batman "It's to late for his redemption" prompting a joke from the Joker that actually makes Batmans hard exterior crack a smile.

This story has tender emotional moments that make the reader feel some emotion for the Joker character whom was at one time a good person who just couldn't get a break as a stand up comic & by doing one wrong thing to allow criminals to walkthrough the plant to gain access next door sets in motion a chain of events that would change his life forever.

At the heart of The Killing Joke it is layered with tragedy & hints at redemption which Alan Moore writes superbly well here.

Alan Moore is certainly one of the best Graphic novel writers to date & here pair's up with Brian Bolland on illustration duties whos exellent illustrated artwork brings to life the characters on the page.

Alan Moore writes not just a action packed & at times a violent Batman story but also adds an emotional greek tragedy element to the story too.

This is a highly recommended Graphic novel & showcases Alan Moore writing at it's very best.

Timelord Rating.
9/10
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short, sharp and dark, 19 Feb 2009
By 
Mr. G. P. Jenkins "Shun's Bridge" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I'm new to the graphic novel medium but after being very impressed with Heath Ledger's re-interpretation of The Joker, and finding out that this was given to him as a reference, I had to take a look.

It's very short, and compared to Watchmen it's nowhere near as rewarding a read, but in the time given it's a dark, twisted tale that boasts gorgeous drawings and colouring that offers something darker and deeper. I didn't really like the idea of having an origin story for the Joker - I prefer to leave the imagination to come up with ideas for why he might be the way he is - but it's definitely the best Batman/Joker story I've read and offers a sharp story that clearly defines the different views on life the two characters take.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply superb!, 21 Dec 2011
I ordered this present for my sister for Christmas as i have heard wonderful things about the comic and i believe it will be right up her alley. When the product arrived i had a sneak peek inside and instantly read the whole thing cover to cover. It has to be Alan Moores darkest comic and to finally hear how the Joker was born (although it is admittedly ambiguous) had me captivated.
Fantastic artwork and dark thrills are going to make this a winner on Christmas day, i know it. Only problem... I was sorely tempted to keep it for myself!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic, 11 Oct 2011
One of the greatest Batman comics of all time. This is a must have for not only Batman fans, but comic book fans. The Killing Joke tells the compelling story of The Joker's origin. Fascinating and interesting. This is the comic book which inspired a lot of Tim Burton's work. Classic!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rewarding read, 31 Oct 2002
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Batman: Killing Joke (Paperback)
As someone rediscovering comics after some 20 years out, this book is something of a revelation. A literate script and beautifully illustrated, this is a rewarding, sophistocated read. Batman seems to be the only 'golden age' superhero who lends himself to tales as dark as this - my other favourite is Year One by Frank Miller. But this is the better book, and I'd recommend it to anyone curious about graphic novels but wary of their relative (to paperback novels) high price. Of course, this is reasonably priced, and fairly short - but it's actually all the better for it. Give me a taught, tense story over the flab that fills many of the longer graphic novels every time!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The definitive Joker story., 23 July 2014
It is probably no surprise that one of the greatest Batman stories of all time is written by the man himself, Alan Moore. I don't necessarily agree with everything Mr Moore says, but no one can deny his brilliance when it comes to his writing style and communication with his artists. As with the timeless Watchmen, Batman: The Killing Joke is a story layered with beautifully crafted story-telling, high emotional drama and thought-provoking events that shake up the mythos and shine new light on themes rarely, if ever, touched upon before.

Escaping from the conventions of standard superhero stories, The Killing Joke centres around the clown prince of crime's psyche while still leaving many unanswered questions about how this crazed mind works. The Batman and Police commissioner Jim Gordon visit Arkham Asylum to find that the Joker has escaped from captivity. What follows is one of the darkest nights of Batman's career, when the Joker goes to the very extreme to prove that the road to insanity is caused by simply one bad day.

The relationship between Batman and the Joker is one of the most defining rivalries in all of comics. Where there is one, there will always be the other. Their conflict is deep, yet they are in many ways inseparable. I don't believe I've yet read a story that really captured who these characters are to each other, and this is shown by perhaps the only time in all of Batman's history where the Joker reveals some brief humanity to Batman. Perhaps this is not as black-and-white as we're made to believe. Like Bruce Wayne, who lost his parents because of one heart-shattering moment in his past, the Joker is clearly another broken human being, stripped of all meaning due to the big joke that is life - as is evidenced in the flashback sequences that explore a possible origin of the Joker.

Moore's brilliance radiates on every page of this masterpiece, along with that of the artist Brian Bolland. Every line is structured to perfection, every panel flawlessly pencilled. Much like in the previously mentioned Watchmen, no scene starts without some kind of superb segue from one scene to the other.

If you claim to be a big fan of the Dark Knight, then you ought to pick this book up right away. It's dark, it's tragic, it's smart and it is everything a good comic should be.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars You can tell that it inspired the Dark Knight., 18 Feb 2010
A Kid's Review
This book gives the Joker a new goal, to show that everyone in the world is like him. Showing that humanity has no will power what so ever, and that all it takes is one bad day for the sanest man to slip down the road of madness. To prove this he kidnaps respected public figure commissioner Gordon showing him naked pictures of his daughter who the Joker shot in the spine, disabling her. This story is interesting and engaging, provoking thoughts about the human condition. Also to accompany this main plotline is the Joker's back story. A tragic tail of love, and a mans desperate attempts to provide for his family. Another strong point of the book is the Joker constantly pointing out Batman's insanity, and the dialogue between the 2 characters is genius. The relationship between hero and villain is one of the main subjects of book. The fact that Batman effectively creates the Joker adds a nice plot twist. But I could go on for ever about the strong points of the story, so I'll go on to a thing that makes this book a great exception in the graphic novel world. The Artwork. Its brilliant, the combat is well drawn, the characters are given great facial expressions. Also Richard Starkings'es lettering in some panels is masterful. Brian Bolland's art excels brilliance, and Alan Moore proves he is the master is super hero story telling once again.

The short story at the end with Bolland as artist and writer is a nicely done as well, with original ideas, and a great character. .
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Artwork, 14 Sep 2009
By 
Gregor (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This 'Deluxe Edition' was the first time I'd read this famous Batman story and I enjoyed it a lot. Its surprisingly short at only 46 pages, and this obviously restricts the possible complexity of the story, but I think it packs depth and information into its short length. Its about the origin of the Joker and also about the relationship and parallels between him and Batman. Single events impacted and defined both their lives but its about how you react to grief and adversity that distinguishes people. "So maybe ordinary people don't always crack."

The artwork by Brian Bolland is really impressive and its a real shame that he and Alan Moore didn't do more work together. Scenes and characters are beautifully portrayed in great detail but there is real taste and restraint as well. I don't know about the original colour scheme but I think the re-colouring here suits the sombre mood of the story very well. (Surely its a good thing to be able to see how the artist originally fully envisioned the artwork ?)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 217 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Batman The Killing Joke Special Ed HC
Batman The Killing Joke Special Ed HC by Alan Moore (Hardcover - 19 Mar 2008)
£9.45
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews