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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 5 March 2012
The thing that I hear time and time again from those that I coach is that they often feel frustrated in their role or organisation because they feel that they have little or no influence or impact (due to their boss, their team, the culture, the people they are leading etc). Therefore the thing that I like the most about this book is the fact that Maxwell seeks to help the reader to recognise that wherever they are in an organisation, they can all exercise leadership, have influence and make an impact, whether that is 'leading up' by influencing those over them, `leading down', with those they have management responsibility for, and `leading across' - with their peers and colleagues.

He highlights 5 areas of where our influence may lie. These are:
1. Position - Influence because of your role.
2. Permission - Influence because of your character.
3. Production - Influence because of your production.
4. People Development - Influence because of who you've mentored.
5. Personhood - Influence because of your personality.

Maxwell writes in a very personable style using real life stories, analogies, and numerous quotes. It is well written and logically structured. Each section includes either suggestions for leaders or questions leaders should be asking themselves. Also at the end of the book there is a 360 Degree Leader workshop for every section of the book with various challenges that can help the reader to apply these principles which can assist their growth in order to go to the next level as a 360-Degree Leader.

I found the book too long at 336 pages but affirm Maxwell's central assertion that you don't have to be the main leader, to bring about change and have impact in an organization - the key for 360 degree leaders is being able to lead their followers but are also adept at leading their superiors and their peers.
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on 3 January 2013
The 360 Degree Leader is a book about leadership for people who are firmly in the middle of their organisation chart - supervisors, assistant managers, managers and so on. Looking at the challenges of leadership and management, the lies people believe, and a whole lot of strategies for growth, it's John Maxwell at his best.

I've read quite a bit of Maxwell, and this is typical of him: tonnes of clever acronyms and catchy phrases coupled with a lot of personal illustrations and a heavy dose of empathy (and cheese), but essentially the same message as all his other books: leadership is nothing more or less than influence, so if you're nice to people, particularly those who already have influence, your leadership skills and opportunities will grow.

It's not quite a career planning handbook, it's more about developing the skill of leadership wherever your career has found you, but if you're looking for something about career planning this is a pretty good start.

If you've read Maxwell and you didn't like the experience, this book definitely isn't for you. But if you've never read any of his stuff, this is a really good one to start with - it sums up a lot of his other books well so you may as well get this one. That said, the content is very much suited to those 'in the middle', so if you're a CEO or a trainee it won't be as helpful for you as it would be for an assistant manager.

I got this book for free from BookSneeze.com in exchange for an honest review.
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on 3 August 2012
Leaders are found everywhere in an organisation and it is actually harder for people to lead from the middle of the organisation. John C. Maxwell's book showed me that even if I am not the main leader, I still need to be developing my leadership skills, influence and potential right where I am.

Leading in the 360° way means looking at yourself first, then how to influence your leader, your peers and finally (what we think of as traditional leadership) the people under you.

I started this book in May and decided to take my time to read it because it was so full of good and interesting information and I wanted to fully digest each chapter before moving on. The workbook at the end really helped with this. And each chapter ends with a review of that chapter as well.

This book has really changed my thinking about leadership and also helped me see my role in leading others completely differently. I don't just have an influence on those below me, but also on my colleagues, and my leaders. It has been very interesting for me putting some of these ideas into practice, and I have already seen some positive results!

His use of practical examples and interesting stories definitely makes this an easy read, and it was only because of the amount of good stuff in it that made me stretch it out over time to get the maximum amount out of the book. As part of having the book, there is an assessment that you can take at [...] and it was interesting to see the results and also really helped with working through the book as well.

Wherever you are working in an organisation, I would highly recommend you to get this book and work through it.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com [...] book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 [...] : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
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on 26 October 2009
This is a really useful book primarily aimed at those making up work groups and in middle management. The principle of the book is that we can all exercise leadership, wherever we are in an organisation, whether that is 'leading up' by influencing those over us, leading down, with those we have management responsibility for, and leading across - with our peers and colleagues. It contains some real insights into issues everyone faces. However, don't expect simple band aid solutions - this book requires real life changes if taken seriously.
If you're an aspiring leader then this is for you.
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on 29 April 2015
The treasure!Was looking for this book for a very long time. It is very easy to read and the author illustrates diagrams and charts to give a better understanding of organisational structure, etc. Must say that this is a BIBLE of every leading person!
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on 25 March 2009
The book is split into six sections, tackling all aspects of leadership where ever you are within an organisation. It highlighted many areas for development, many of which I am still working on 3 years on.
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on 10 April 2013
For someone who has spent most of his career in the middle, this is an essential guide to ensuring you stay effective and not frustrated.
Don't bother with the online test mind, just dive straight in
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Frequent author John C. Maxwell applies his career counseling formula to another aspect of leadership: how people in the middle of large organizations can add to their company's leadership equation. His popular books rely on long lists of myths, challenges, principles, rules or values. Each one is identified, numbered (Maxwell is a firm believer in the power of numerical orderliness) and accompanied by an example or uplifting story - often making it unclear whether the book is inspirational, instructional or both. In practice, will people refer to these lists, or simply draw from Maxwell's major concepts? Although leadership defies a static definition, we believe this book may come in handy for enlightened senior and middle managers, as well as for those who are involved in developing up-and-coming managers.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 11 January 2006
I have read and then reviewed most of Maxwell's previously published books which offer solid content, if not head-snapping revelations. For The 360º Leader, he has selected an important but neglected business subject: the middle manager who has far more responsibility than authority, who struggles to earn respect from her or his peers while accommodating the needs and interests of superiors, and who frequently feels overworked and under appreciated. That situation is even worse when reporting to the kind of pedant whom Jean Lipman-Blumen describes in The Allure of Toxic Leaders. As usual, Maxwell has organized his material with almost mechanical precision: a separate chapter devoted to each of seven "Myths" in Section I, to each of seven "Challenges" in Section II, to each of seven "Lead-Up Principles" in Section III, to each of seven "Lead-Across Principles" in Section IV...you get the idea. Perhaps because of Covey's influence, seven remains a favorite number to Maxwell and to other authors of business books.
I do not assert that Maxwell has a "cookie cutter" mentality. Rather, to suggest that he demonstrates in this book far greater facility with bromides than he does with insights. He is a conscientious recycler of ideas, especially those expressed in his earlier books. I found much in The 360º Leader that is clever but very little that is original. I appreciate the "Review" at the conclusion of each of the five sections. I regret that he merely lists the seven whatevers without annotations which would have made a periodic review of key points more rewarding.
With regard to this book's title, I think it has far greater potentiality than what Maxwell offers. It is indeed highly desirable for all managers -- not only those in the shrinking middle of once hierarchical organizations -- to maintain a synoptic (i.e. a 360º) perspective on the business world which surrounds them. Peripheral vision is no longer sufficient. Moreover, it is also important to "look" up -- at goals yet to be reached or visions yet to be fulfilled, for example -- and to "look" down to make certain that one's feet are on solid ethical ground. In my opinion, Maxwell fails to demonstrate a 360º perspective on his subject: how to develop (positive and productive) influence from anywhere in the organization.
There is also the matter of how one defines "leadership." Presumably Maxwell agrees with me that it is not dependent on one's rank, social status, title, salary, etc. Rather, it is the result of natural talents and innate qualities which have been carefully developed, indeed nourished. (Maxwell has much of value to say about that in other books.) Add some good luck, fortuitous timing, and a spoonful of "street smarts" and you have someone whom others respect and trust, someone whom others will voluntarily follow. What I think Maxwell means by "leadership" is actually initiative, one of the qualities most highly praised by Napoleon Hill who stressed the importance of "going the extra mile" and by Dale Carnegie when explaining how to win friends and influence people. Maxwell acknowledges neither in this book.
I have indicated my disappointment in a book I was so eager to read. Presumably it will be of interest and value to some people. If so, good for them as well as for Maxwell. However, I suspect there are others who need thought-provoking insights rather than the broad generalities on which so much of Maxwell's narrative depends. To them I strongly recommend James O'Toole's Creating the Good Life and Michael Ray's The Highest Goal. Neither is an "easy read." Fair enough. Neither are many of the situations we face in our lives each day.
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