Customer Reviews


47 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (14)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (6)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pure Hate
I'll not detail this review with all the things that go on in the book. I have read all Richard Morgan's work so far, and I love his style.
This book, I feel , is largely underrated because of its Chomsky-ish overtones, and people tend to get bogged down in politics. That is why I'm not going to go through that here. Instead, I found the real message of this book to...
Published on 14 Jan 2006

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Concepts, But Could Have Been Better Written.
This is a step off the beaten track for Richard Morgan, which is an excellent path for authors to take. To try and explore other domains, other characters and other scenarios really does show depth and ability.
I do however have many issues with this book and don't think it was as well written, as it should have been. The first is that although this book is not set...
Published on 22 Feb 2005 by Chris Chalk


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pure Hate, 14 Jan 2006
By A Customer
I'll not detail this review with all the things that go on in the book. I have read all Richard Morgan's work so far, and I love his style.
This book, I feel , is largely underrated because of its Chomsky-ish overtones, and people tend to get bogged down in politics. That is why I'm not going to go through that here. Instead, I found the real message of this book to be about relationships.
Morgan has a style rarely seen that details relationships very subtly, and doesn't get too involved. All the same I found myself caring more and more about what happened to the other characters in the book rather than the anti-hero Chris Faulkner. His wife, while caring and worrying, dealt nobly and realistically with the hate coming from Chris. I could also feel an affinity for Mike Bryant, Chris's immediate superior and friend, even though a cold killer.
Anyway, for my tuppence worth, I liked this book. It was dark, depressing, and in a Global Corporation/Republican regime, it was scarily possible (apart from the car duels).
As oil prices rise and work is the new religion, money is becoming the new god. I'm not religious. I'm just worried. As we spend more time away from our loved ones, into the arms of our jobs, who do we love?
I scared that all we may be left with is money and hand-wringing from the ones who care.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Corporate greed extrapolated to a logical conclusion, 11 Oct 2006
By 
S. Murphy (Bolton, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is an excellent book that combines classic future society angst with Death Race 2000. If that sounds awful, trust me, it makes for a very compelling read.

As usual Morgan's writing and characterisation is gritty and in-your-face. Our (anti-) hero elicits limited sympathy from the reader as he ruthlessly and sefishly battles up the corporate ladder. British society has virtually collapsed into a semi-anarchic state where a corporate elite pretty much writes its own rules. Competion in business is literally cut-throat with 'road raging' being the preferred method of negotiation: to the survivors the spoils.

This isn't an intellectually challenging book but I found it emotionally satisfying at a number of levels. I think most fans of the cyber-punk genre will find it so too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed, but politically relevant, 24 May 2007
Abandoning Takeshi Kovacs for this novel (although Morgan ironically refers to a TK novel within the text through the thoughts of his main character, describing it as `a little far-fetched') the author takes us to a near-future Britain, controlled by media and big business. It's a Britain where rich and poor are separated geographically, the disaffected being confined to `the zones'.

Chris Faulkner is a hot-shot rising star in the world of Investment, but this is a Britain where boardroom battles are conducted on the road. Road rage has been legalised and is now the preferred method by which executives battle for promotion.

It is a mark of Morgan's persuasiveness as a writer that this rather `far-fetched' and farcical idea is made entirely convincing.

Chris is head-hunted for a post at Conflict Investments, a company specialising in profiting from the destabilisjng of foreign regimes, usually by selling weapons to their opponents, and immediately comes into conflict with almost everyone. From this point on, Morgan drags us into a relentless Shakespearean tragedy in which Faulkner is gradually pushed down a road where paradoxically, through doing what he thinks is the right thing, he is gradually dehumanising himself and transforming into a man numb to the feelings of those around him.

What lets the novel down is the dialogue which, for some reason, never rings true. Maybe it's because the major characters, particularly Chris Faulkner and his new best mate, fellow executive Mike Bryant, who are interchangeable in terms of dialogue. There is no real difference in their speech patterns and although Morgan has written Bryant as a wise-cracking wit, it never really comes off the page that way.

In some ways it is Morgan's best book so far. Certainly he has done his homework on Politics and Commerce in a Capitalist world and has served us up a horrifying vision of what our society could grow into.

Oddly, it also owes a debt to Zelazny's `Damnation Alley' via its spiritual descendant, `Mad Max'. The film was an early and powerful influence on Morgan and some of its scenes were no doubt in the back of his mind as he set about creating this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Concepts, But Could Have Been Better Written., 22 Feb 2005
By 
Chris Chalk "Chris" (Croydon, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a step off the beaten track for Richard Morgan, which is an excellent path for authors to take. To try and explore other domains, other characters and other scenarios really does show depth and ability.
I do however have many issues with this book and don't think it was as well written, as it should have been. The first is that although this book is not set many centuries in the future, the lead character - Chris Faulkner - is in a very similar mould to the author's previous lead and the environment he writes in is just as desperate!
The second issue I have with this book is the confusion of ideas, I found the concept of the corporations investing in wars to be quite intriguing (although I did find this over played) but I did find the "Mad Max" style road wars to be completely superfluous to the tone of the book, and in all honesty made a bit of a mockery of it.
The last issue I had with the book was that is seemed to base its lead concept on the premise that the majority of current business men, or at most those one generation away, can all be turned into cold hearted killers. This I really struggled with and the author never offered me a reason as to why, or how this had happened, more he alluded that this kind of drive and ambition already exists at the heart of all business and just needed an outlet. Now I am sure we all agree this may exist in part in SOME businesses but to allude to the majority would soon be acting like this needed more explanation.
In summary I found this an interesting concept but I believe the author may have let gone a little too far with some anti-capitalist beliefs without enough explanation. Well worth a read but the author has written better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars William Gibson's heir, 12 July 2005
By 
Readers expecting a space opera along the lines of Altered Carbon and Broken Angels could be disappointed as the style here is somewhat different. But approach this allegorical tale of globalisation gone mad in the near future with an open mind and it is hugely enjoyable. It is also a more intimate and human story offering some insights into the gradual cooling of a relationship, which could be familiar to many modern males fighting to balance career with the demands of conscience and family life.
As with Morgan's other works, it contains dark humour, some well-depicted scenes of ultra-violence, and a wealth of ideas about the direction of future society. It also has something to say about business ethics; the unconverted could find this objectionable and the converted could find it unnecessary, but take it as a novelised version of Naomi Klein's No Logo and you should be just fine.
Richard Morgan quite clearly takes several ideas from William Gibson and runs with them - in this case mostly from Count Zero, one of the very best Gibson novels. (Identifying these is left as an exercise for the reader.) Morgan writes with the same outstanding clarity and precision and that is itself, to this reviewer, more than enough to make him truly Gibson's heir.
Possibly the whole book was sparked off by the geekly use of the expression 'road warrior' meaning a laptop-equipped corporate executive.
Some other potential inspirations:
Stand on Zanzibar (1969) by John Brunner
Gladiator-At-Law (1955) by Frederik Pohl and CM Kornbluth
Mindstar Rising (1993) by Peter Hamilton
Snow Crash (1992) by Neil Stephenson
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My 100-word book review, 9 Mar 2006
By 
A. J. Cull (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
It is the year 2049, and anyone craving success in the brutal world of Conflict Investment must not only have business sense but must also be ready to fight high-speed duels on Britain's deserted motorway network. Richard Morgan's third published novel is a wry cautionary tale about corporate politics in an impoverished and divided world. Readers may find the near-total urban decay and the unsympathetic characters somewhat depressing, but Morgan's writing, as usual, is engrossing and imaginative. This may not be reality as we know it (thank goodness!) but is horribly vivid, with the unpleasant internal logic of a nightmare.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Fun Read, 18 May 2011
By 
Derek Allen (Bury, Lancashire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is a near futuristic fantasy that, unreal as some of the concepts were, was great fun to go along with. Some of the other reviewers should remember it is a story and as such, this one was told in a gripping and entertaining fashion. For harder future sci-fi, check out the Altered Carbon set and Black Man also by Richard Morgan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gives Iain Banks a run for his money, 22 Mar 2011
By 
I have despaired of finding an author to match Iain M Banks but Richard Morgan achieved this with his Altered Carbon series. With Market Forces, Morgan also matches Iain 'no-M' Banks with a superb work of fiction with a twist. This is really social science fiction that imagines a near future no different technologically, but follows a thought experiment taking current social, economic and political structures and processes to extremes. Our current credit crunch woes with complex derivatives are as nothing compared with the nightmare of 'conflict investment'. Stiff upper lip fiction readers may balk at the suspension of disbelief required to imagine financial executives road-rage duelling for contracts and partnerships on deserted motorways.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not one of my favourites from Richard Morgan, 8 May 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Much as I like Richard Morgan's work in general - Tadeshi Kovacs trilogy and Black Man which I thought great, verging on genius - somehow Market Forces just didn't quite work for me.

Perhaps because of having read Harlan Ellison's short story on the topic of 'Road Rage' the idea seemed somewhat stale. Admittedly Ellison's short offering left a lot of room to develop a back story which is what Morgan sets out to do in this novel. The world he described as the context in which formalised Road Duels become socially acceptable just some how didn't quite hang together for me. I couldn't put my finger on exactly what it was. Sadly after having read - devoured - all his other work, this just fell flat for me.

Still as they say; "You can't please all the people all the time" I am still a big fan of Richard Morgan's work and would strongly recommend his books. But I certainly would rate this offering as just an also ran.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chillingly possible, 2 May 2010
By 
Roy Brookes "roybrookes" (Hamburg, Germany) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The kind of world described in this book is all too chillingly possible, and intelligent people looking at what is happening in the World now are already worried. Richard Morgan's writing is very believable and he whirls you along his chosen path at breakneck speed. I love all of his books because they are all so different and anarchistic in a subtle way. I am not going to give away plot details as enough other people have done that already. I prefer to talk about the man's style, and he does have style. If you have never read any of his works, get them, read them, they are worth it. He writes the best science fiction I have ever read, and I have read all the "greats".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Market Forces
Market Forces by Richard K. Morgan (Audio CD - 15 April 2005)
£30.45
Usually dispatched within 2 to 4 weeks
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews