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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read life story of Henry's second wife
Written in 'first person', this novel is an easy way to learn about Anne Boleyn's life. It is from her point of view, which does explain all the "I" this, and "I" that. Although this did get to be a bit tiresome, her story was compelling and readable. Anne 'double thinks' some of her experiences and reactions throughout the book, and is eventually able to explain to...
Published on 20 Aug 2003

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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Story Time
This book is definately more of a story than a historical account. Told from Anne's point of view, the beginning is a bit slow and concentrates very much of Anne's childhood in France with Henry VIII's sister Mary when she was Queen of France. I would say a good read, but historically inaccurate in parts. More for entertainment than serious study!
Published on 14 Dec 2003 by Ms. Gayle Mcmartin


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read life story of Henry's second wife, 20 Aug 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
Written in 'first person', this novel is an easy way to learn about Anne Boleyn's life. It is from her point of view, which does explain all the "I" this, and "I" that. Although this did get to be a bit tiresome, her story was compelling and readable. Anne 'double thinks' some of her experiences and reactions throughout the book, and is eventually able to explain to herself (and to the reader) why she ended up in The Tower. Henry comes off as a 'bad guy', which is not surprising. His character is built on sturdy lines. To my mind, this book is for the person who is not familiar with Anne's story. It sets up her life nicely, gets into the details (but not overly so) of her time at the French and English Courts, and gives the reader a synopsis of her brief existance.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read brilliant account of a tragic life, 19 Aug 2002
This review is from: Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
This was the first book I read from Jean Plaidy's Queens of England series, and it will deffinately not be the last. This is the story of Queen Anne Boleyn, told in first person. The book starts on the eve of her execution, and she then decides to review her short life, the book then goes back to her youth in France. It is brilliant book filled with drama and suspense. I would recommend this, and any other Jean Plaidy book, to those who are interested in history. The book sticks to the facts, but makes it more interesting by being written as if by Queen Anne herself. If one is interested particularly in the ill fated Queens of Henry VIII, I would also recomment Jean Plaidy's "Rose Without a Thorn", from the same series but about Queen Katherine Howard.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good read. involving., 27 Dec 2000
By A Customer
One of the best treatments of Anne Boylen I've read to date. I've occasionally re-read it since childhood. From the Tower of London Anne recalls how she came to be there. Charting early family life, her education at the erudite yet decadent french court, first love, marrage to the king and later danger. Character portrayal is a nice mix of the glamourous, bewitching figure who cameos in every book of fiction about Henry VIII or Elizabeth I, and three-dimensional realism in tune with sympathetic historical assessment. Not a great book exactly but a quality read that doesn't sink into cloying sentimentality or bland sterotypes. If you want a good, historical yarn that brings the people involved to life yet doesn't make you scream with it's obvious inaccuracties check this out. If you enjoyed this also have a look at Queen of this Realm, by same author, and Legacy by Susan Kay. Both about Elizabeth.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant read, 26 Aug 2013
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This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book and found the author took you back in time when reading it. Highly recommended for any fan of Anne Boleyn
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Tragedy of Anne Boleyn, 12 Aug 2013
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This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
Anne Boleyn was the second and most famous of Henry VIII's six wives.
Henry's determination to marry her, in part, led to the separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church.
Another reason was that Henry wanted the wealth of the Church in his own hands being a greedy grasping man.

The book begins with Anne's incarceration in the Tower of London as she reflects on her life.
We are taken back to when Anne was seven years old and traveled to France to serve in the household of Princess Mary, sister of Henry VIII, and wed to the King of France, Louis XII.

We are given the colorful details Anne experiences and witnesses in the Royal French Court. Anne's beautiful sister Mary becomes mistress to the new king of France, Francois, but is sent back to England in disgrace , because of her lack of discretion at the French court.
Mary was simply too trusting and simple to hide her indiscretions which were all too common in the French court, but were done in more secretive and hiding fashion, Mary Boleyn with her big beautiful blue eyes saw no evil, thought no evil and spoke no evil, but gave her love freely without considering the consequences.
She was sent back to England and married to a poor nobleman, William Carey.

Mary Boleyn later became mistress to King Henry VIII.
She too was discarded by Henry who became infatuated with Anne, and became determined to make her his mistress despite her refusal.
Anne's love with with a young and honest nobleman Henry Percy was destroyed by King Henry and Cardinal Wolsey.
And eventually Anne enticed to marry King Henry in exchange for becoming Queen.

Henry secretly married Anne in January, 1533. Henry's Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer pronounced Henry's first marriage null and void.
Anne Boleyn was crowned queen in June and because of circumstances beyond her control was unpopular with the English people and had many enemies.
Anne gave birth to Elizabeth in June.
But Henry a cruel and selfish man had wanted a boy and soon tired of Anne.
After she repeatedly failed to produce a male heir, Henry and his chief minister Thomas Cromwell had Anne framed for adultery and executed.
Anne reflects in this book on all that passed and the target that could have been averted. She reflects that the way in which the king showed no compassion for his former mistress, Anne's sister Mary, after she was widowed and fell into dire poverty. He had discarded her and wished not to be reminded of her existence.
Anne recounts how she should have had some insight into the nature of the King and what lay in store for her.
She reflects that hypocrisy was second in nature to Henry and he used it so well because he believed it when he said it.
Only just before her execution did she realize that behind his mask of geniality "bluff King Hal" was a selfish misogynistic monster and murderer.

A tragic story of a woman who was chosen by Henry and stood no chance after he selected her as his paramour.
Her great dignity and courage in the tower in the face of death, her great fear being only for the future of her three year old daughter Elizabeth, is extremely moving.
I think Jean Plaidy is a far superior historical novelist to Philippa Gregory because Plaidy's novels are more historically accurate and pay greater attention to historical detail.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A COMPELLING STORY THEN AND NOW, 15 Nov 2008
By 
Gail Cooke (TX, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (MP3 CD)
To hear versatile actress Anne Flosnik read The Lady in the Tower is to be transported to 16th century England, to the court of Henry VIII. While Henry was, indeed, a contradictory figure his court was even more so, filled with plotting, scheming, betrayals of trust. Flosnik's voice itself takes us there with a distinct, brisk British accent. Her tone is both soft and firm. Add to this voice her acting ability and you have an exemplary performance, one that holds listeners rapt even though most know the outcome.

Throughout history we find women who intrigue, their stories captivating us even after centuries have past. Surely few of those lives are as compelling as that of Anne Boleyn.

History does not accurately record the date of her birth with guesses ranging from 1501 - 1507. What is known is that as a young girl she was sent to France, to the household of Mary, Henry VIII's sister who was the wife of Louis XII. She returned to England in 1921 to prepare for a marriage which did not take place. Following this she had relationships with several men. Anne was an ambitious woman, and eventually caught the eye of Henry VIII who was then married to Catherine of Aragon.

Catch Henry's eye she did and more. When she refused to become his mistress he decided to divorce Catherine and marry Anne. The marriage did finally take place after she became pregnant with his child, a girl. Anne never produced a son; Henry's attention soon turned to another. She reigned for a brief three years as Queen and the drama of those days continues to attract us.

Highly recommended

- Gail Cooke
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, 19 Aug 2007
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This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
How much you like a book depends very much on the book you just read. Although I very much enjoyed this book, it was definately outshone by Rose Without a Thorn, which I had just read. If you have a choice, I recommend you go for that one. However, Lady in the Tower is also an excellent book, which you can really imagine,and it's not really fair to make comparisons.The horror of being wrongly accused of adultery and sentenced to flame or sword because your husband has fallen in love with another woman is horrifically brought to life in this book, especially as you were the one that brought down his first wife, all those years ago...
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Story Time, 14 Dec 2003
By 
Ms. Gayle Mcmartin "jockchick" (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
This book is definately more of a story than a historical account. Told from Anne's point of view, the beginning is a bit slow and concentrates very much of Anne's childhood in France with Henry VIII's sister Mary when she was Queen of France. I would say a good read, but historically inaccurate in parts. More for entertainment than serious study!
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3 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GOOD BOOK!, 21 Nov 2005
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This review is from: The Lady in the Tower (Paperback)
This novel about the beheaded queen Anne Boleyn is fascinating, depicting the beautiful time of Anne's childhood in France, with the Eiffel Tower, the lovely, swishing French fashions and the romantic Queen Mary, sister of Henry VIII. Anne returns to England and eventually becomes his second wife, after 6 years. This book was good, but the language was frightful! I know that is was set nearly 500 years ago, but the language was VERY old-fashioned. Still, a great book.
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The Lady in the Tower
The Lady in the Tower by Jean Plaidy (Paperback - July 2003)
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