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57 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Systematic, comprehensive, insightful
Taubes is considered as THE low carb hero, paving the way for good nutrition, and giving relief to diets such as primal, paleo, atkins and south beach. But not based on his opinion or his own research...based on a thorough, detail, systematic and objective review of literature from the 19th century to today.

I bought this book to learn more about how the low...
Published on 1 Mar 2010 by Dr. A. DEWITT

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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars wasnt in the format i requested
I ordered this book with great anticipation of receiving it. when it came i was disappointed to see that it was in cd format and not a book. so i returned it and my refund has been issued. Thank you
Published 15 months ago by Wunder Angermeier


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ground-breaking book, 28 Jun 2010
This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
This book is fantastic. It challenges the prevalent view on what constitutes a healthy diet. It will change the way you eat forever.

Some chapters are a bit technical and hard to understand. But, in general, it is comprenhensible.

Stop believing the lies that the AHA is regurgitating. Buy this book and see the truth for yourselves.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely interested, 6 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
I would recommend this book without hesitation for all those with an interest in diet and food related issues. It reads more like an academic text than most books on the subject, which is a refreshing change. This is amongst the most intelligent of books on the market - and in reality i can't recommend it highly enough.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astounding, 4 May 2013
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
I didn't think it was possible for anyone to do so much research into a topic. Gary Taubes must have read (and analysed) every article written about diet published in the last 500 years and the result is a convincing and sometimes shocking summary of the food industry and how we've been mislead all these years. If you're a dr or dietician you have to read this book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars its great, 28 April 2013
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Ms. Z. Ford (uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
its always nice to read a book confirming what you already think!!!
A bit of a heavy read but every page contains such informative stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good book, 13 April 2013
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
Thanks for the book. Very good read. Enjoyed it. Definitely recommend it to those interested in health & fitness. x
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24 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Go unrifined!, 19 Oct 2007
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Dobrin - See all my reviews
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The first impression may be that Gary Taubes actually supports the well known Atkins' Diet. However, the author has no problem with unrefined carbohydrates such as potatoes, carrots, apples, brown rice, whole wheat, etc. He also points out that dietary fats are not the evil they have been made out to be for a long time. Instead, the refined carbohydrates 'bread made from refined white flour, white rice, refined white sugar, etc.' may be the real dietary evil. In a nutshell the author's message is that in order to get rid of unwanted pounds one needs to focus on getting rid of refined carbohydrates from the diet. It seems to me like this message is taken straight from the book Can We Live 150 by M. Tombak. In fact Dr. Tombak doesn't hesitate to classify refined carbohydrates as nothing else but poisons and his chapter on obesity and proper food combination is probably all you need to know to control your weight. Both Taubes and Tombak agree on the fact that moderation is always the best course.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book before you read anything else on nutrition, 29 Dec 2009
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
"Good Calories, Bad Calories" is informative, educating and enlightening beyond words. Still, I have mixed feelings about it. Once again, I read a book that explained scientifically how one's diet choices influence what's going on in one's body. Once again, I was overjoyed about finally having found the answer to the question "what and how I should eat to be healthy and happy". And once again, as I began applying my new-found wisdom, I found out that my organism is not in accordance with the science.

What led me to reading books on nutrition in the first place was my realisation that much of what I had been told about healthy lifestyle just didn't fit in. I had done muscle-building excercises for a couple of years strictly by the book. The amount of visible muscle I built in that time was exactly zero. Another time in my life, I decreased my weight by 8 kg. It was pretty easy, only then I realised that weighing 81 kg, I looked just as fat as when I had weighed 89 kg. So why bother? I have also observed how my weight remained the same, plus-minus a few hundred grams, during almost one year, although I ate and drank whatever I wanted as much as I wanted. And, of course, I have seen many people eat apparently much unhealthier food than me and still remain lean. So there was clearly something rotten in Detroit.

This book is unique among the multitude of nutrition books available today. You see, most authors' goal is to convince you to eat or not eat one or another thing, and they give you only so much science as to justify their agenda. It wouldn't be such a big problem if different authors' (supposedly scientifically proven) nutritional guidelines weren't in such a grave contradition to each other. But they are. That's why I'm fed up with diet books consisting of the author's unshakable conviction, propaganda-like anecdotes, overblown promises and occasional bits of scientific proof.

Mr. Taubes chose a totally different approach. He started looking answers to the questions like:
Why is there a lot more chronic disease in civilised societies than primitive ones?
How does eating one or another type of food affect obesity, heart disease, chronic disease, general health?
Why do many people fail to lose weight by diet and/or exercise?
And so on.
He collected as much scientific research on those questions as he could find, and he had no idea what results they would eventually lead to.

That's what this book cosists of. Dozens of pages after dozens of pages of scientific studies, public discussion, political decisions. In that sense, the book is really an overkill. Many times, I found myself convinced of one or another point, and wished Mr. Taubes would move on to the next thing, but he just kept bringing on another study confirming the same, and another, and another. But considering how controversial some of the findings are, such overkill is probably necessary in order to not give the malicious opponents an opportunity to attack the book's valid points with the argument that some of the research has been ignored.

This book reveals many interesting facts about fats, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, VLDL (ever heard of VLDL before?), insulin etc., many of which would alone justify wading your way through all that complicated science. Shockingly, many of those facts run against what we are told by our doctors and the health authorities. Why that is so, is also explained thoroughly in the book. Basically, at the time things were yet unclear, some resourceful fanatics got convinced than one of the competing hypotheses was right, and they succeeded in turning some politicians' heads, and by the time it began to appear that the hypothesis was wrong after all, the snowball had grown too big to stop. Scientists who had put their careers into proving the wrong hypothesis, just couldn't admit they were wrong, so they suppressed contradicting evidence and presented research results selectively so that it seemed to support their hypothesis. Other scientists were afraid to speak out the truth because that would have meant ridicule by the authority figures and loss of research funding.
The story of how our modern nutrition myths became so powerful is an amazingly educating story for its own right, but even that is relatively unimportant compared to the book's central conclusion. Even though Mr. Taubes is extremely careful to avoid expressing any personal opinions, this book demonstrates convincingly that decades of scientific research leads to one conclusion: obesity, diabetes and a number of so-called civilization diseases result from Something in your food. If you want to lose fat and be healthy, you have to avoid eating foods that contain Something. (I don't want to reveal to you what Something is because if you knew that in advance, you might be less willing to approach this book without prejudices as it deserves.)

Surprising as it was (and not exactly in accordance with my eating preferences), it made perfect sense, especially so because that's pretty much the way I've seen some people eat who are in far better shape than I am. Understandably, I decided to put my new-found knowledge to practical use immediately. I modified my next meal, skipping the part of it that contained a high percentage of Something.
Guess what? I hadn't felt so miserable for ages, physically and mentally. Yes I know, there is an explanation in another book and on a well-known website as to why that is so. It's supposed to be a withdrawal symptom which you just have to go through, and it's supposed to pass in a few days or in a few weeks. Well, that's not good enough! There is no way I'm going to do THAT to myself again voluntarily. You'd have to lock me up and force-feed me, otherwise I'd be liable to commit suicide.

Now, one of the very few things Marxists got right was the principle that the gold standard of truth is practice. It means that no matter how convincing and flawless something looks on paper, if it doesn't work in real life, it's worthless. The mind-blowing, eye-opening revelations in this book presented with such overwhelming proof, such deadly logic, clearly didn't apply for my organism in the real world. It might be because I am different from the average people, who are to be expected to make up the majority of randomly selected research subjects, but that's not the point. The point is that, as convincing this book is, it obviously doesn't represent the whole picture.

Now, after reading "Good Calories, Bad Calories", I'm like a tiger who has tasted human flesh. There is no way back to "eat this, don't eat that" type of books. I just can't take any of them seriously. It's amazing how even guys like Tom Venuto have got their nutrition basics so wrong. I guess that the only course of action left to me is to find information sources that acknowledge that not all people have been created equal. I have already discovered that there is something called "metabolic types". I have read "Eat Right 4 Your Type", but I didn't quite like it as it contained just food lists without hardly any scientific background. Besides, it told me to become vegetarian. I won't do that because I want to remain a man, if you know what I mean. I have ordered a couple of books on metabolic typing which haven't arrived yet. Until then, I'm left trusting my gut feeling.

But at the very least, this book has irreparably shattered several nutrition myths for me, and that's why it still deserves five stars.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is now called "The Diet Delusion", 25 Sep 2009
This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
This book is now called The Diet Delusion, a much more fitting title than "Good Calories, Bad Calories".
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5.0 out of 5 stars I just wanted to let people know that this is one of the best books ever written and should be taught in schools, 9 July 2014
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
I am not going to write a long review. I leave the words to the writers I am but a humble reader. I just wanted to let people know that this is one of the best books ever written and should be taught in schools.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Heavy but extremely interesting, 7 July 2014
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This review is from: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health (Paperback)
An extremely in-depth resource for the history of nutrition in the western world, as well as the science behind it. It is a very heavy read, not something one would read before going to bed. I equate this to a university textbook in terms of language used and content, which may put some off, but I think the information in the book is incredibly valuable.
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