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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It successfully teaches you!
Despite being an introductory book (but hey, it's what its title says!), Griffiths delivers Quantum Mechanics in a comprehensible way.
Even if you're not the most knowledgeable in math or physics, this book takes you step by step and manages to really make you understand things along the way with clear explanations and calculations. It even has some humour along the...
Published on 17 Feb 2009 by Manuel Nascimento

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Review
The book was of poor quality and looks nothing like it did in the image above. The pages are very fragile and the cover was damaged
Published 4 months ago by Peter Strain


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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It successfully teaches you!, 17 Feb 2009
By 
Manuel Nascimento "Cinetyk" (Linda-a-Velha, Portugal) - See all my reviews
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Despite being an introductory book (but hey, it's what its title says!), Griffiths delivers Quantum Mechanics in a comprehensible way.
Even if you're not the most knowledgeable in math or physics, this book takes you step by step and manages to really make you understand things along the way with clear explanations and calculations. It even has some humour along the way to keep things pleasant.
I'm a physics college student and I had tried to learn QM with several books before which fail to do it (especially the one by Gasiorowicz) because they omit passages or simply assume the calculations are obvious, which they're not, usually, unless you already know the subject. And if that's the case, a book with "Introduction to" is not what you need, and I'm sure you can find more advanced textbooks.

The only flaw I can find is that there aren't as much worked examples as you might want, but Griffiths specifically says in the book that you can't learn quantum mechanics without working most of the problems on your own. Still, this can be solved if you find the "Solutions Manual", by Griffiths himself, elsewhere...

Griffiths also has a book on Classical Electrodynamics and Particle Physics, both very good and totally recommended.

In short: even if you're not a genius but want to learn QM this is an excellent choice, you'll be able to learn it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Physics Textbook, 22 Oct 2011
By 
Dr. Bojan Tunguz (Indiana, USA) - See all my reviews
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Quantum Mechanics has a reputation for being one of the most esoteric topics in all of Physics. This reputation is largely well deserved, and it has it source in two aspects of Quantum Mechanics that make it particularly hard to understand. Conceptually, Quantum Mechanics puts to test some of our most deeply engrained intuitions about the Physical world. Such notions as the reality of the world apart from our attempts to observe it, causality of events, ability to measure all of relevant quantities at the same time, and localization of physical object are all put to the extreme test. On the other hand the mathematical machinery and sophistication that is required for understanding even some of the simplest quantum mechanical systems is rather daunting. Quantum Mechanics is usually one of the last undergraduate classes that Physics majors take, usually in their junior or senior year, after they have acquired a certain level of mathematical maturity and sophistication. There is a school of thought that posits that the conceptual subtlety of Quantum Mechanics can only be appreciated once the mathematical background is fully mastered. I happen to subscribe to that school of thought, and in my opinion Griffiths' textbook is the surest and the most straightforward path to acquiring the requisite knowledge and mathematical skills for the fullest understanding of Quantum Mechanics. This should definitely not be the first exposure that one gets of the Quantum Mechanics, but those students who are already familiar with some basic problems and results can benefit greatly from this textbook. In fact, in my opinion this is the best overall science textbook. The writing is clear and to the point, chapters and sections are self-contained and build on previous material in the book, there are plenty of worked-out examples, and the problems at the ends of the sections and chapters are designed to put the concepts and the material to its proper use. All of the problems are well-formulated, and there is hardly any ambiguous wording anywhere. Some of the problems are extremely difficult, and can take many, many hours to work out. Those should be attempted only by students who feel very comfortable with long calculus calculations.

When I was an undergraduate this textbook was assigned as an optional/supplementary reading material. Most of us ended up using it more than the official textbook for the class or the professor's notes. I also relied a lot on this textbook for the concise and clear explanation of certain points when I was taking a graduate level Quantum Mechanics. Now that I am actually teaching this course I have used it as the primary textbook for my class and have been extremely satisfied with the decision.

No textbook, of course, is perfect and there are a few things that I would have liked changed about this one as well. It would be useful to have a list of important equations at the end of each chapter, with the explanation of what they are used for. Even though I appreciate its abstract and mathematical approach, many students would benefit from having more of real-world problems and explanations early on. It takes almost all of the semester to get to the first physical system that has any real-world relevance. But other than these problems, I think this is a truly remarkable and great textbook, and it's likely to remain the paragon of good Physics textbooks for at least a few more decades.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best quantum mechanics book, 13 Sep 2009
Of all the Quantum Mechanics books I've gone through, this one is by far the best so far. But even without comparing it to other books, it just is a very good QM book. Everything is explained in a logical order, and the difficulties and misconceptions that crop up in your head after reading a hard passage are very often addressed immediately in the sentence after, by the author asking those questions himself and then answering them in a very conversational manner (then sometimes creating a highly useful dialogue of questions regarding the answer etc. that quickly lead you to the very root of the misunderstanding, and teach you loads along the way). Often I found myself grinning while reading this, as the way things are explained are so amazing and you see so many connections that it becomes an almost exhilirating read.
This book pretty much taught me quantum mechanics, and I've gone back to it very often to look up useful pages I had marked (I'm finishing my master's in theoretical physics now).
It's an amazing quantum mechanics book, and I highly recommend it to anyone wishing to study the subject.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cant go wrong, 24 Mar 2009
By 
Luis Vela "LEV" (Prague, Czech republic.) - See all my reviews
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I have already two books from the same author, and i just enjoy so much his style. His approach to QM, diferentiating between doing QM and understanding QM, is unique and very effective (In a pedagogical sence). I highly recomend this book, and i have no bad reviews so far.
I just can tell that its a good book, and for an introduction to the subject its the right one.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent! Well done!, 23 Feb 2006
Griffiths is one of my favourite authors, and this book is really a masterpiece, the best on the market about quantum mechanics. True, there is no historical introduction, the experiment that led the birth of the quantum theory are not described, but the classification of the material (theory and applications plus a very interesting afterword) is very well done, there is no aspect of quantum mechanics that is left out, and the exercises are very challenging and interesting. It is one of the books I use the most.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Self study, 26 Jan 2013
By 
S. Nicholson - See all my reviews
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I am finding that this book is excellent for self study, I need a book that gives you all the necessary detail, thats written in a friendly style. For me this is the perfect book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant introductory work by a great writer, 26 Jun 2012
I have little to add to all the other positive reviews, save that this book is also a suitable ground-work for introducing QM in philosophy of physics courses (undergrad), too. For physics majors, its a good introductory text to use straight after first year introductions to the formalism.

For personal reading: Griffiths is a brilliant author - clear, good humoured, conscious that he needs to write for diverse audiences. People who are doing independent research (and thus prob most likely to be reading this review on Amazon) should take note: this is the book for you. That is, if you've done a bit of linear algebra and have some acquaintance with QM already, this book will guide you through the abstract stuff, introduce you to some elementary applications, and discusses some of the vexed 'interpretative' issues to boot. The method Griffiths adopts is ahistorical and scant on worked examples (as noted by other reviewers), but the book is anyway more in the style of e.g. Penrose, and thus works by getting you to work. The best method for teaching, imho.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best physics textbook written, so far., 12 April 2013
By 
Dr. P. P. Cook "Munglebrush" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This is the standard that all other theoretical physics texts should measure themselves against. It is excellent for the student studying QM for the first time and a joy to read even for the journeyman physicist. Superb for lecturers planning a first course in QM and replete with excellent problems. I cannot recommend this text more thoroughly.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book but be careful about buying the Kindle edition., 30 Jun 2014
By 
D. Green (UK) - See all my reviews
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This is an excellent book especially if, like me, you are studying outside university.
Explanations are a model of clarity; including detail that is often omitted from other books.
Please, unless you are sure it is what you want, do NOT buy Amazon's Kindle-format version of this book (I assume that is what is being sold here) if you intend to read it on a Kindle tablet.
The book is available in Adobe format from the publisher's web site. That is where I bought my copy.
Why?
Because I already have several Amazon format Kindle text books and they are awful to read on the Kindle Fire HDX 8.9.
One example is "The Theoretical Minimum: What You Need to Know to Start Doing Physics"
Reading Amazon's 'The Theoretical Minimum' on the Kindle Fire HDX 8.9 is a miserable experience.
This due to equations being tiny (often unreadable) and failing to zoom with the text.
You have to double poke the formula or equation which then pops up on its own and you can't see the text any more.
I suspect that the Paper White Kindle is as defective as the Kindle Fire HDX but will be happy to be proved wrong.
The fault appears to be with the Amazon Kindle software.
Amazon is very negligent in not providing a decent reader for the Kindle Fire HDX tablet.
Note that:
1. The iPad Kindle program is OK in my experience.
2. Amazon format books are also OK on the PC.
I happen to know that authors are just as frustrated by the obduracy of Amazon in this regard.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Everything suddenly makes sense!, 12 Jan 2014
This review is from: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (Paperback)
When you're a struggling university physics student, you need a clear explanation to be handed to you and fast. Griffiths' book not only explains everything in a patient, concise manner, it also somehow possesses the property of magically making everything click in your brain. This book has helped me so much with topics I never thought I'd be able to understand.
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Introduction to Quantum Mechanics
Introduction to Quantum Mechanics by David J Griffiths (Paperback - 1 Aug 2013)
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