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39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent learning aid
This set provides flash cards for all of the Kanji which were required knowledge for levels 3 and 4 (the two easiest levels) of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) prior to 2006. Please note that JLPT levels are cumulative, so if you wanted to take the L3 exam you would need to know all the L3 and L4 Kanji.

The JLPT has now changed to a 5-level...
Published on 25 Jun. 2009 by Boing

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Well presented
Very well presented and laid out but the card they have used is very flimsy. I would have preferred more durable card and because they are so flimsy, it does not feel like value for money.
Published 18 months ago by Daisy Green


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39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent learning aid, 25 Jun. 2009
By 
Boing (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This set provides flash cards for all of the Kanji which were required knowledge for levels 3 and 4 (the two easiest levels) of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) prior to 2006. Please note that JLPT levels are cumulative, so if you wanted to take the L3 exam you would need to know all the L3 and L4 Kanji.

The JLPT has now changed to a 5-level system, N5 to N1, with level N5 being essentially the same as the old L4 and level N4 being the same as the old L3. The kanji covered in this set are suitable for revision for the new testing scheme.

As with their Kana flash card box, White Rabbit have planned this set out very well indeed and built on the experience of their previous releases.

What's in the box?

- A printed card guide explaining the layout, which also includes a large yomi index and a stroke index,
- One double-sided Hiragana/Katakana chart,
- 103 Level 4 (N5) Kanji cards (green),
- 181 Level 3 (N4) Kanji cards (dark blue),
- 3 or more recommend-a-friend cards,
- A couple of cards about White Rabbit.

The cards and even the box they come in have been designed to be both appealing and informative. There is little clutter, and simple design in combination with a controlled colour palette means the information is easy to digest.

The 3.5x2.5" cards are glossy with rounded corners and apparently are coated with "UV varnish" which presumably makes them fade resistant to some degree.

The Kanji cards are well-designed. Unlike the kana cards, they are presented horizontally to allow more information to be fitted in. Moving down the card and from left to right, you have:

- The Kanji symbol itself,
- A list of example kanji compounds (giving a total vocabulary of 1700 compounds across all the cards),
- The card number (1-284),
- A grid containing similar-looking kanji, with their meanings and card numbers,
- The stroke numbers for writing the kanji,
- The radical/s for the symbol,
- The stroke order diagram for drawing the kanji.

Flip the card over and you have...

- The "On" reading (borrowed Chinese), written in Katakana,
- The "Kun" reading/s (Japanese), written in Hiragana,
- The meaning/s in English,
- A diagram of the kanji elements, with their separate meanings,
- A handy "progress meter" which shows how far through the 284-card syllabary the current kanji appears,
- List of Hiragana readings of example compounds, with meanings in English.

As you can see, there is a lot of information packed into this set.

Be aware that there is NO ROMANISED READING on these cards, other than the English translations, so you do need to know your kana. I recommend using the White Rabbit Kana Flashcards set (also reviewed).

I also recommend using the cards in conjunction with a free language resource site which gives audio clips, or a reputable Kanji learning text which provides Japanese pronunciation guides.

I definitely recommend this set for anyone who wants to learn the basic Kanji. This set is very portable (although you may wish to get hold of some elastic bands - you'll see what I mean) and can be kept in a bag, glove box, etc. Check out the publisher's web site for additional resources!
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than Tuttles Kanji flash cards kit., 6 May 2008
By 
R. Tablada "rtablada" (Gloucester, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I highly recommend this product as it is a White Rabbit Press release which is well-known for high quality study guides especially the flash cards.

Wut's good about this set is that it forces you to learn to read and/speak the kanji which has 6 useful examples when used in a compound or a phrase. Providing, that is you have at least memorised the kana [relatively with hiragana]. There's also NO romaji whatsoever which might be frustrating at first but it does help you use what kana characters you have remembered and to actually use them. It's harsh but it keeps you constantly mentally accessing the kana.

Another thing is the layout. The design serves well as on one side it features the kanji itself and the stroke order and the 6 examples of its use. On the back is where the kana equivalent of the 6 examples and the english meaning and the kun
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Professional cards for the dedicated learner, 11 Oct. 2009
By 
H. Cowlishaw (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I'm going to try and make this a brief review as I tend to ramble on! After beginning to read 'Remembering the Kanji' 1 I wanted to get some cards to carry around with me during 'dead' time on buses etc, and looking around I saw these were highly rated so I decided to get them over other packs I'd seen.

Good points: The cards are professionally made, with good quality card, smart fonts and a glossy finish. The layout is comprehensive and the leaflet that comes included with the box clears up any misunderstandings (I got a bit confused about the smaller kanji to the right of the main one). I like the fact that almost everything is in kana or kanji as this encourages learning of both and improves reading skills, however this also means that these are not the kind of cards the casual learner may want to use or those used to romaji, though I think the majority of people who buy these cards know that Japanese is very hard to learn casually! The cards are really useful as they point out similar looking kanji which you may confuse with the one you are looking at, as well as showing the strokes forming the kanji and compounds formed with the kanji. The kanji for the different levels of the JPLT are coloured differently which makes it a lot easier to sort through and when learning for level 3 it gives you an idea of which kanji should be coming easily to you and which are going to be newer and harder to learn.

Bad points: I found the order of the kanji cards difficult to get to grips with, as I don't think they are ordered in a way that helps you to learn them alongside traditional, conversational lessons (I can't be sure, I'm a home learner). For example, the kanji for the numbers are scattered throughout the pack rather than grouped together. I can only assume this is so the user does not have to shuffle the pack in order to learn the kanji individually rather than from anticipating their position in the sequence. However, for those people who want to use the cards alongside classes where they may have learnt a set number of kanji in a class, they are going to have to look through the pack to find those that they want to practice. Also I find the pronunciation part at the back of the card difficult to understand at times when there are /'s ands .'s dividing different pronunciations as I don't know if they correspond to the English translations below them. Perhaps this is something I've missed myself but being a beginner and knowing others may use these as beginners I think it's worth pointing out.

There's probably more I could say but I think I've gone on long enough. Overall, I don't regret buying these at all, I think they will be more useful to people who have been learning for a time and want them solely to practice any kanji which they have already learnt, but I wouldn't try to use them as a learning tool on their own, especially as a beginner! They are really nice to look at and information-packed without overloading the user, so if you're interested in learning Japanese seriously then I would go for these definitely.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars These cards make kanji studying fun and easy, 18 April 2009
By 
A Passer By "Book Lover" (Leeds) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
I have started learning Japanese about 8 months ago but have been putting off the studying of kanji. I find kanji rather terrifying and, really, I tried to avoid it as much as I can. However it is impossible to be proficient in Japanese without knowing kanji (which means being illiterate and stopping the learning process by not writing anything - which means not practicing grammar as effectively). So, after finding this kanji flashcards's set and reading the reviews I decided to buy it and I'm really happy with the product. This set has 284 kanji cards which help to prepare for Japanese Language Proficiency Test level 3/4 (the easiest one). These 284 kanji are very frequent and common in Japanese vocabulary studied by the beginners. Each character has it's stroke order written down on one side of the card and about 6 sample words made of that certain kanji. The set also includes a card with hiragana/katakana alphabet on each side (it is helpful when you forget them sometimes). Both on and kun readings are written, as they usually are, in katakana and hiragana. So no romaji is used for Japanese words.
The flashcards are great if you want to organise kanji into the groups of learnt kanji, recognised kanji and unlearnt kanji. It is brilliant for a quick review and studying. I really recommend these cards to everyone (and it's cheaper than to make one's own cards - I tried that too!).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pretty darn good, 27 May 2009
I'm actually going to amend my score of this product to two stars in light of having used Heisig's method Remembering the Kanji: Complete Course on How Not to Forget the Meaning and Writing of Japanese Characters v. 1 (Manoa) which quickly teaches you ALL of the Jouyo kanji, when used in tandem with any of the free SRSs you can find online. If you don't know what an SRS is, Google it, and enjoy the epiphany.

That said, if you want flashcards for on-the-go learning and don't want to try the wonders of the SRS, and your goal is to pass the JLPT exams, then the below review stands as it was, five stars and all. Just know that there are far better ways to learn the kanji than this.

"Since making one's own flashcards is time-consuming and tiring, I bought these to try to learn some basic new kanji.

The cards are (as the name of the product suggests) geared to the lower JLPT exams, with all of the kanji required for said exams present. The set is attractively presented, with a glossy finish to the cards. There is an awful lot of information packed on to each card - from the kanji itself, to their kun-yomi and on-yomi readings, to other kanji with which they could easily be confused. Stroke order is also provided (possibly the greatest asset of the cards).

A variety of readings (each marked with the JLPT level at which they first appear) appear on the reverse of each card, with translations - this helps put the characters into context. There is also a brief description of the radicals from which they are formed (which may aid memorization).

All in all, they are a rich resource for any student wanting to improve their knowledge of the written Japanese language, with no discernable disadvantages. I would recommend using them in concert with Henshall's "Remembering the Japanese Characters", which has marvellous descriptions of each letter's etymology, and hence useful ways of committing them to memory."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Practice makes perfect, 2 May 2012
By 
A. Ward (Birmingham, England) - See all my reviews
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Prior to buying these I had used the hiragana and katakana cards of the same series to master learning kana (Kana Flashcards: Learn and Remember Kana in a Flash With Visual and Verbal Mnemonics). Having had great success with these flashcards I decided to get the next set as I had started GCSE Japanese as a night class and also wanted to sit JLPT N5.

The cards are very clear and each card has, on the back, words which use the kanji displayed on the front. The cards also teach the stroke order and display similar kanji, which I find a useful feature. These cards will easily help you for GCSE, N5 and even N4. These are definitely worth the investment - I purchased a card case from White Rabbit Press along with their large kanji wall poster (I recommend this if you're serious about studying kanji) so I carry these around in my bag to review kanji when I can. They're very portable and great for studying on the go. :)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great tool, 3 Feb. 2009
By 
Mr. E. K. Murray "Donman" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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I love these cards. I use them all the time. They are well made and have great mnemonics. Thier is no romaji (except for the English) so a understanding of Kana is necessary. If you have trouble memorising all that kanji then these are ideal.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, 8 Oct. 2009
By 
I am very impressed with these flash cards! They have everything you need to use the kanji effectively, like words and phrases. They also have the stroke order on the front, something I had trouble remembering properly!

A word of warning: you will need to have at least learned hiragana before you buy this, otherwise you won't be able to understand the words on the back. Knowing katakana will also help, but I've gotten away without knowing it and it is still just as useful...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this is great, 6 Aug. 2008
By 
J-f Hector - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
i've been looking for some affordable kanji flashcards.
these are excellent and affordable.
go for it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great!, 6 Jan. 2014
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This review is from: Japanese Kanji Flashcards: 300 Beginner-Level Kanji Cards: 1 (Cards)
I bought these as a gift for my hubby who is learning Japanese so we can watch the Japanese Sumo tournaments (the things we do in retirement!). He thinks these are terrific and has given them pride of place on the book shelf! For those studying Japanese, these are THE cards to get..
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