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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Douglas Adams meets Clive Barker and Storm Constantine
Brilliant urban fantay California-style, when a group of chic and drug-acquainted clubgoers meet with a fugitive demon-or fallen angel,if you like. Meanwhile from the Vatican Bishop Robert conducts a delicate investigation on the mysterious demise of a model student,whose last tape (tape? wouldn't it be a You-Tube video, nowadays?)is a rambling tirade about demons. The...
Published on 1 Mar. 2008 by Ventura Angelo

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2.0 out of 5 stars Needs an editor to chop out the waffle
I wanted to like this novel, but I have just waded to half way through and added it to my 'did not finish' collection.

The plot and premise were very strong, and the writing style and dialogue convincing. The main issue for me was that there were vast tracts of waffle about nothing of any interest. Unusually for my tastes I have to say 'way too much show, not...
Published on 19 Feb. 2012 by Not A Number


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2.0 out of 5 stars Needs an editor to chop out the waffle, 19 Feb. 2012
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I wanted to like this novel, but I have just waded to half way through and added it to my 'did not finish' collection.

The plot and premise were very strong, and the writing style and dialogue convincing. The main issue for me was that there were vast tracts of waffle about nothing of any interest. Unusually for my tastes I have to say 'way too much show, not enough tell'. It was a bit like reading "Wind in the Willows" but with drug addicts instead of moles.

If these troublesome sections were meant to sow seeds for later development, I'm afraid the crop was buried under a surfeit of fertiliser. For example, it is made clear very early on that there is some heavy and dangerous drug use going on amongst the protagonists, however the author's recurring discussion of drugs and their use (and names, and how to take them, and their effects ...) was simply tedious. In one scene the group of friends are eating out, and drugs are taken during the meal. Irrespective of how significant this is to plot or character development (although the 'lifestyle' has been made abundantly clear by this point) the scene - as much of the novel - plays out like a six-year-old's diary : first one naughty boy does drugs (with associated commentary from peers, then the next one and then, yes, one by one the reader has to sit through a repeat. The reader simply does not need this level of detail or repetition.

There are some interesting discussions about relationships and philosophy, but like the plot these communications from the author also suffer from the generally poor 'signal to noise ratio'.

Another reviewer likened the style to Douglas Adams. As a long time fan of that author (and I realise that having met the guy at book signings and thereby acquired multiple copies of his work only paints me as an erstwhile stalker rather than lending credibility as as reviewer of literature, but having virtually destroyed copies of his novels through re-reading I can claim more than a passing familiarity with his style) I didn't see this. If you took a Douglas Adams work and replaced his wry observations and absurdities with entire episodes of Panorama you might get a bit closer in terms of length and levity.

There is a good novel in here somewhere, but I grew tired of digging for it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Douglas Adams meets Clive Barker and Storm Constantine, 1 Mar. 2008
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Ventura Angelo (Brescia, Lombardia Italy) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Fallen (Paperback)
Brilliant urban fantay California-style, when a group of chic and drug-acquainted clubgoers meet with a fugitive demon-or fallen angel,if you like. Meanwhile from the Vatican Bishop Robert conducts a delicate investigation on the mysterious demise of a model student,whose last tape (tape? wouldn't it be a You-Tube video, nowadays?)is a rambling tirade about demons. The two storylines will interact dramatically, and for our friends Nick, Darren, Thea and Eddie times are going to be interesting indeed.
Written with a brilliant, humorous style reminiscent of Douglas Adams, original and intriguing as Clive Barker's stories, sensual as Storm Constantine can be, this novel, is certainly worth reading!
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The Fallen
The Fallen by Joshua Dagon (Paperback - 15 Sept. 2007)
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