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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moody is a master storyteller!
I originally started reading Mr. Moody's books from the Hater series and went on to purchase each volume of the Autumn series.
I bought this final volume, filling in what was missing from the previous books, telling stories from before, after and during the events that happened in the series. Once again, I couldn't put the book down.
Moody is a master of telling...
Published 6 months ago by Mika Saint

versus
4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but lack of writing skills let it down.
This book shows the events from other viewpoints in a bunch of short stories (usually about 4 pages).

They are good stories but the lack of vocabulary from the author really started to annoy me.

Just read a few pages and see how many times the words "bloody", "hell" and in previous books "dont know" are used. The character all seem the same.
Published on 30 April 2006 by AK


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moody is a master storyteller!, 14 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Autumn: The Human Condition (Paperback)
I originally started reading Mr. Moody's books from the Hater series and went on to purchase each volume of the Autumn series.
I bought this final volume, filling in what was missing from the previous books, telling stories from before, after and during the events that happened in the series. Once again, I couldn't put the book down.
Moody is a master of telling stories of every day life mixed with drama, trauma, crisis and ultimately the demise of people's lives.
I often find myself put off by author's writing styles, but from the first book of Moody's I read, I always found myself caught up in the writing. I've yet to find someone who can tell a story so well, be it in third or first person. Every thought, every action, every piece of dialogue feels real, and that's what makes these books so captivating and heartbreaking at parts.
I highly recommend the Autumn series, as well as the Hater trilogy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The reality of the apocalypse, people aren't that nice :D, 26 July 2013
Having read all of the previous autumn novels; the Human Condition does not disappoint. Told from the perspective of about 50 different people, it details the end of the world through the eyes of very ordinary people, leading every day lives, and for me, that is what makes this book and the whole series in particular, most horrific.

David Moody's style of writing is gritty and personal, his glimpse into the human psyche and direct story telling style indicate to me a writer who can capture and unnearth the peculiarities of the individual; none of his characters have superpowers or big guns, but their tales of survival and humanity in a world vastly different to that which they woke up to, is chilling and frank.

Moody's world is full of weak, ineffectual cowards, charismatic survivalists and those just too stupid to even accept the chain of events that has led to 99% of the population of England suddenly dropping down dead. At times heart breakingly sad, what would we all do when we have to contemplate continuing without our loved ones? How would the average person cope with being thrust forward into a world full of dead people?

In order to achieve maximum horror; readers need to identify with those people we experience through the pages, for me, gun toting he-men who can live off the land and gut rabbits, really do not resonate with how I would behave in a world that has died. This novel, (as in the previous Autumn books), illustrates how complex the human condition is and how we as a species would ultimately react; not the clichéd Hollywood fantasy with (perfect hair) either, with pauses for romance or a good old argument, just honest, frank accounts of the human condition.

If you enjoy realistic horror, coupled with first person accounts, tangled up with characters that display all of the diversity of human behaviour; then this novel is most definitely for you.

Autumn
Autumn: The City
Autumn: Purification
Autumn: Disintegration
Autumn: Aftermath
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A suitably grim companion piece to the epic Autumn series, 7 July 2013
By 
John Milton (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Autumn: The Human Condition (Paperback)
A little over a year ago, I read Autumn a bleak and powerful tale of the walking dead by British author David Moody. Now, having read the first novel and subsequent four follow-up books, I have just finished Autumn: The Human Condition which purports to be the final book in this epic series.

For those not familiar with the author or the series, David Moody took a massive gamble when he unleashed his zombie novel Autumn on the internet for FREE. The gamble paid off and more than half a million downloads, a handful of sequels and movie deals later, Moody has the kind of acclaim that many authors can only dream of.
Having read more than 1,500 pages set within the Autumn universe that Moody has created, I genuinely wondered where he could possibly take another entry in the series. Thankfully, the author delivers further high quality prose in The Human Condition, setting out almost fifty stories and weighing in at a mammoth 158,000 words; these are stories which narrate the untold experiences of survivors familiar to readers of the preceding entries in the Autumn series, new characters and also from an aspect less visited within the zombie sub-genre, providing a unique experience for fans of horror fiction.

Stylistically, the set-up for The Human Condition is slightly different to its predecessors in that this is a collection of differing tales with snapshots of survivor's stories, discrete tales unconnected with the characters from the Autumn universe; and explanations of what many of the key players from the preceding novels faced prior to coming to the reader's attention. Additionally, Moody provides the reader with something that fans of Autumn have craved for quite some time: the root cause of the downfall of mankind.

The strength of The Human Condition, as with all of the entries in the Autumn series, lies with the author's focus on what may be considered the ordinary. This is not a story about a scientist's race against time to find a cure for the zombie plague or of a unit of special forces taking down the walking dead or simply a collection of dialogue leading from one action setpiece to another; this is about how the apocalypse has impacted on "regular" people, with unsurprisingly differing outcomes. Replete with mental breakdowns, base emotions, murder, suicide and despair, The Human Condition is a suitably bleak addition to the Autumn series. That said, Moody does not neglect the more visceral and brutal aspects of this horror tome either. Death and dread are ever-present, disease is rampant and the hordes of walking dead continue to decompose, resulting in increasingly nightmarish cadavers plaguing the living and leaving behind unholy excretia and detritus wherever they roam.

It is difficult for me to look at The Human Condition objectively since I am such a fan of the series and feel that this title is a powerful and striking way to finish the overall narrative. I was concerned that a casual reader approaching this as a standalone title could perhaps be left confused by proceedings, having no appreciation of what has occurred in the previous five books. However, The Human Condition does offer an overview from the initial cataclysmic event to the tribulations of many of the key characters from Autumn, via some fantastic interludes illustrating the experiences of different people, some of my favourites being The Garden Shed, Angel and; Joe and Me.

Originally released in 2005, this latest edition of Autumn: The Human Condition contains fourteen new stories, developing further the dark and bleak universe that the author has created; garnering praise from many such as best-selling award-winning author Jonathan Maberry and will enhance the appreciation of Autumn from pre-existing fans and serve as a powerhouse of an introduction to the uninitiated.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Before, during and if you surive, the after - if not there is always the other way out!, 24 Aug 2009
It should be accepted that zombie literature is not done to any great skill..but it sure is fun! This aside, the human condition is exemplary to the classic Romero-style walking dead. This book is as oppressive as a mass of rotten bodies. My friend could not get through this book after reading the trilogy. I feel that this is because the book contains too many terminal events. The prequel shorts for characters involved in the trilogy are not as successful as the stories of new characters. For those wanting to know what happened to the soldiers in the bunker are in for a treat. The book is composed of thirty-six shorts including a few after the concluding events of the trilogy. It also has an appendix. Some material was available for a while online as 'echo's' but it does contain unique material too. This book is for those left wanting (needing!)more after the trilogy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Part Guidebook, Part Companion and Completely MUST HAVE, 23 Mar 2014
This review is from: Autumn: The Human Condition (Paperback)
This book was offered to the Ministry of Zombies in exchange for an honest review.

Firstly, I was lucky enough to get my hands on a limited edition hardback of this book and let me tell you it is one fine looking volume. In an age where cheap e-books rule, it’s a beautifully made real book with no expense spared.

Secondly, if you are a fan of the Autumn series then this is an absolute must. I didn’t know what to make of it when I first looked at it. There are loads of short stories – some almost vignettes – all set in the Autumn world. I wasn’t sure I was going to get on with it as it’s not a straight novel.

I dipped into a few of the short tales. Pretty good stuff. I picked another because I liked the title – it filled in a major blank for me about what happened to two main characters between the books. Another answered what went on in the bunker. I carried on like this for a week – picking up the odd tale and just enjoying it.

Then I read Joe and Me – that tale is one of the most important in the whole series of books. No spoilers from me but this collection is the perfect end to this series.

If you loved Autumn, get it. If you can get this limited edition hardback. If you don’t know the Autumn series – read it – it’s the best UK zombie fiction out there.

I can’t really recommend it any higher than that and you can probably imagine, I spend a lot of time thinking and reading about zombies!
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book to further your 'Autumn' experience., 13 Feb 2006
By 
Chris Hall "DLS Reviews" (Cardiff, Wales) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Autumn: The Human Condition is the forth book in David Moody’s post-apocalyptic zombie saga. The book is a companion book that explores various characters sub-plots during the time of the Autumn novels. The book evolved from the Autumn: Echoes series that has been available as a free download from David Moody’s website. The book draws reference to a lot from all three previous Autumn novels, mostly from the third instalment Autumn: Purification.
From the very start of this companion book, the mood and atmosphere is very downbeat and dark, as the reader is taken through 35 vastly different perspectives of the end of the world. The book is broken down into time frames, starting with the horrific beginning of the epidemic to the final hours of the few survivors. A thoroughly enjoyable and in-depth read throughout, you get to follow the path of one particular zombie, allowing the reader to empathise and try to understand a little more of the stages that the zombies went through in the previous three novels.
With the exciting news recently released of David’s next proposed Autumn novel, this book is a great piece of reading to take you further into his desperate world. There are a few chapters in the book that stand alone as fantastic pieces of fiction such as “Duck and Cover”, “Office Politics”, “The Human Condition” and “The Garden Shed”. Each give a very full and eventful tale from other survivors that were never visited in the previous books. There is also a final chapter entitled “Underground” that takes you back to the underground army bunker from “The City” and “Purification”, where you get to see the after effects of the devastating battle that was fought there. This particular chapter, in my opinion, is one of Moody’s most dark, horrific and gore filled chapters to date.
The book ends with a few pages of character references that simply details and reminds the reader briefly of who and where the characters in the book appeared in the other original ‘Autumn’ books.
The book is released through David Moody's own publishing company 'Infected Books' and runs for a total of 320 pages.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sadly, hopefully not the last, 29 Aug 2013
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Even though its rehashed,, it is still the leader of the genre, sadly It. Looks. Like. The. End. Sad really
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4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but lack of writing skills let it down., 30 April 2006
By 
AK (London, England) - See all my reviews
This book shows the events from other viewpoints in a bunch of short stories (usually about 4 pages).

They are good stories but the lack of vocabulary from the author really started to annoy me.

Just read a few pages and see how many times the words "bloody", "hell" and in previous books "dont know" are used. The character all seem the same.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cash cow, 17 April 2009
By 
Mr. G. Battle (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
There's no real reason to read The Human Condition. It's a disparate collection of short stories which seem to be chapters from the previous three books, modified somewhat, but rehashed none-the-less. So, with no new content, no singular plot, no continuity, there's little left to compel the reader. It's not a guide book either, since it offers very little new data. I'd struggle to find a reason to recommend this entry in the series, it's for Autumn fans only.
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Autumn: The Human Condition
Autumn: The Human Condition by David Moody (Paperback - 1 July 2013)
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