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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A CORNWALL TRAGEDY - 33 LIVES LOST OFF CORNISH COAST, 5 Jun. 2014
This review is from: The Mysterious Loss of the Darlwyne: A Cornish Holiday Tragedy (Paperback)
On July 30th 1966, England won The World Cup, but whilst the nation celebrated there occurred on the following day, Sunday July 31st 1966, one of the worst British sea tragedies of modern times.

This took place when the motor vessel, Darlwyne, was lost off Cornwall with all thirty one men, women and children on board.

Despite a massive air and sea search, The Darlwyne was never found…

This book brilliantly tells the tragic story of The Mysterious Loss of The Darlwyne.

Around 30 colour/mono pictures. Here's what a Royal Navy Spokesman said: "“It has been like looking for a needle in a fifteen square mile haystack. We feel sure the Darlwyne is out there, somewhere in that area.”

The story that has to be told...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A GOOD BOOK WITH AN APT TITLE, 24 July 2014
By 
R. Chetsingh - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Mysterious Loss of the Darlwyne: A Cornish Holiday Tragedy (Paperback)
I found this book compelling. It gives a clear factual account of the all-too-cavalier arrangements preceding the holiday
cruise in circumstances that proved all-too-dangerous to the cruiser overloaded with passengers. Martin Banks undertook
research which he fully documents in the list of sources. These add a further twist to his careful, dispassionate account of
a sequence of events that led to questions in Parliament and a necessary tightening of rules ensuring that vessels are
seaworthy. The loss of lives is thus framed in a context which makes the account well worth reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sometimes "Health and Safety" has a purpose, 29 July 2014
By 
Four Violets (Hertford UK) - See all my reviews
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For some reason my friend Mandy’s mother did not let her go on the Darlwyne on its last fateful voyage on July 31st, 1966. Had she done so, Mandy would have died along with the other passengers, for there were no survivors from the 31 on board. Mandy’s mother had been best friends with Carol Tassell since they were 19. Tragically, Carol died along with her husband and three children aged 14, 12 and 8.

My own mother still speaks with horror of the incident, it affected the Cornish very strongly as well as all the bereaved families. Mandy still talks of the barn owl who visited her mother at an open window on the night of the tragedy.

The awful fact is that the Darlwyne was not fit to be at sea, and especially in such dreadful weather conditions. Having managed to get to Fowey they should never have attempted to return, and in fact as someone shouted advice not to attempt it, someone from the boat yelled back “mind your own business.” Perhaps the thought of the cost of transporting everyone back by road was a factor?

It was incompetence, arrogance and ignorance that killed 31 people, many of them children, 27 of them guests at the local Greatwood Hotel. Who was held accountable? Some who I think should have been accountable for their share of the blame seem to have avoided it. Why was the 16’ dinghy found drifting, cut loose, were 4 people seen clinging to rocks survivors, later swept off again? When was the coastguard alerted and why were no lifeboats launched earlier? Then there were those who escaped the trip, pleading hangovers perhaps from celebrating England’s world cup victory the day before.

We all have negative views about health and safety but the incident helped prevent the ease with which unlicensed operators could dice with people’s lives.

Had mobile phones been around…. In fact had social media been around AFTER the disaster I’m sure there would have been far more of a hue and cry. Cornwall could feel so remote.

This account pulls together all the facts –as far as we can know them - and that is good – for it must never be forgotten.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A New Light On An Overlooked Disaster At Sea, 14 July 2014
This is a thoughtful and well researched account of a little-known disaster that occurred the day after England's World Cup victory in 1966. The writing is measured, and notwithstanding the terrible facts of the tragedy, the author never descends into overt sentimentality or tries to cast aspersions on the uncoordinated attempts at rescue. Although the book is (correctly) very factual, we nevertheless find ourselves drawn to the dreadful plight of the victims, and to the families left behind searching desperately for answers. An excellent book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An exhaustive account of a preventable tragedy, 15 Oct. 2014
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A well overdue examination into the tragic and needless loss of the boat Darlwyne and its passengers. This is a clearly written, fully referenced account using all of the rather scanty evidence available. How over thirty people could have drowned and such little effort be put into finding them or the ship remains as much of a mystery as the loss of the craft itself. Although Mr. Banks is careful not make any unsubstantiated claims in his excellent book, there is a suspicion that perhaps the tragedy could have been avoided if the whole of the country and not just this corner of Cornwall was not labouring under one almighty hangover following England's world cup win the day before. Might this account for the tardy response from the rescue services? It's hard to say but for now, this book represents the most authoritative account of the Darlwyne episode.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 15 July 2014
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Excellent research & very well written. Could not put it down!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and Informative, 7 Jun. 2014
Martin Banks writes with a clarity which keeps the reader engrossed in this factual documentation of a series of events which, linked together, led to the loss of 31 lives at sea in July 1966. He has cleverly interwoven Newspaper Reports, Photographs and comments from people connected to the area with statements from Politicians and Commentators at the time to produce a real flavour of the atmosphere surrounding this tragic occurrence.

A pearl of investigative writing
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5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting account of a bygone tragedy, 17 July 2014
An interesting and thoughtful account of a bygone tragedy. Although this sad loss of life at sea only happened in 1966 it had been forgotten until now. Martin has done a great service with his well researched book in bringing this event back into the public domain.
Gil & Sally Bushby
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5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent thought provoking read., 13 July 2015
An excellent well researched account of a long forgotten tragedy in 1966.
Martin Banks depicts the dreadful lack of health & safety procedures so prevalent in that era
allowing so may people to perish needlessly.An excellent thought provoking read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Cornwall's sad tragedy., 1 Oct. 2014
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I can remember this event happening so it was very interesting to read about all the background to it. At least good came from such a terribly tragic event ensuring it should never happen again. Well written book, may they rest in peace now.
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The Mysterious Loss of the Darlwyne: A Cornish Holiday Tragedy
The Mysterious Loss of the Darlwyne: A Cornish Holiday Tragedy by Martin Banks (Paperback - 9 Jun. 2014)
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