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10 Reviews
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very approachable
This is a very different format to most books, being done in graphical / panel approach. Very effective, and very easy to read. If I had to nit-pick, this does mean that the overall **content** of the book is significantly less than the traditional text format (don't expect this to take hours to read!).

However!! There is strength in the simplicity and brevity...
Published on 1 May 2012 by Marc Gravell

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed
Maybe only worth 3 1/2 stars.

Consider each section more an essay on topics. Covered are:

- electro therapy and how it helps patients with depression
- homeopathy and how the treatment is nothing more than a placebo effect, which is unscientific
- Wakefield and how he convinced the world falsely to not give vaccines to their...
Published 4 months ago by Mr. B. Shepherd


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very approachable, 1 May 2012
By 
Marc Gravell (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Science Tales (Hardcover)
This is a very different format to most books, being done in graphical / panel approach. Very effective, and very easy to read. If I had to nit-pick, this does mean that the overall **content** of the book is significantly less than the traditional text format (don't expect this to take hours to read!).

However!! There is strength in the simplicity and brevity of the arguments raised (which are presented clearly and concisely), and I can very easily imagining giving this to someone who insists that homoeopathy is the "new medicine", and that the combined MMR is "dangerous", and they would have to work hard to come up with a reason not to understand it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed, 27 Dec. 2014
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Maybe only worth 3 1/2 stars.

Consider each section more an essay on topics. Covered are:

- electro therapy and how it helps patients with depression
- homeopathy and how the treatment is nothing more than a placebo effect, which is unscientific
- Wakefield and how he convinced the world falsely to not give vaccines to their children
- how chiropractic treatment is unscientific and a hoax
- crack pot theories that man didn't go to the moon
- the dangers of cracking and how these are conveniently covered up
- the evidence of climate change
- evolution and why it's true (very basic)
- science denial - why do people deny science? Media bias, political agendas and giving both side an equal say.

In truth I learnt a few things and got to revisit a few I already knew. However it really wasn't much of a comic, which is what it was supposed to be, that is unless you call the drawing of the narrator with a speech bubble a comic book figure?!

I found it rich that The author derides those working with or on behalf of pressure groups, with pre-conceived ideas, to promote set ideas. Really he is encouraging us to question right? So he's got endorsements from New Scientistic, but clearly backs an anti-religious/superstitious agenda (admirable yes). Okay, who gave him support, oh looks it's Coyne. Ain't he one of the outspoken atheists who derides religion and heavily promotes the saintly virtues of science? Yes he is, guess that explains the last chapter then. Appears our author is not immune to his own misgivings.

Whilst this book does include topics of science it really is just 200 pages of The authors own opinions and rantings. Yes he does introduce us to some scientific topics but his own opinions are things he himself suffers from.

Overall I got the book for £1. It's not really a comic as the art is terrible and virtually non-existent. To listen to this guy's opinions I wouldn't part with my pound willingly. More than that would be too much in my opinion! Take the punt at your own risk, just don't expect much - and certainly don't pay more than a quid!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Complex scientific issues made accessible., 28 April 2012
By 
Jazzrook - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Science Tales (Hardcover)
Darryl Cunningham makes effective use of the graphic novel format to discuss some important issues in contemporary science.
This fascinating, well-researched book covers controversial topics such as electro-convulsive therapy, moon landing conspiracy theories, climate change, evolution and alternative therapies.
'Science Tales' deals with complex ideas in an accessible way and this book is an ideal entry point for the general reader interested in understanding current scientific debates.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The (Re-)enlightenment as a graphic novel, 29 July 2012
By 
P. G. Harris - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Science Tales (Hardcover)
The idea of this book is very simple, brilliantly so.

Cartoonist Daryll Cunningham takes on a number of popular and common attacks on scientific rationalism and debunks them in comic book form. The book starts with an open discussion of the merits of Electro Convulsive Therapy, recognising that there are arguments on both sides but ultimately calling for a less primitive alternative.

Thereafter Cunningham goes straight for the jugular of the anti-science lobby, in turn tearing into topics such as homeopathy, the theory that moon landings were a hoax, and climate change denial. He ends with the big one, slaying the head in the sand ostrich of science denial.

This book is very much the first cousin of Ben Goldacre's wonderful Bad Science, and as such you will not like it if, for example, you believe that science is as much a belief system as religion, or that creationism and evolution are equally valid theories.

Science Tales is not a deep and detailed scientific thesis. It is a graphic novel which you will be able to get through in an hour or two. It does however get across some powerful concepts in a wonderfully simple and beautifully comprehensible fashion

Scientific Tales should sit alongside Goldacre's book in every school library. I cannot recommend it enthusastically enough. If you already "get it", you will find it highly entertaining. If you are ambivalent about the claims of science vs its challengers, I would suggest, if you are genuinely open minded, that you give Cunningham a go.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Science made simple, 17 July 2012
This review is from: Science Tales (Hardcover)
Another fantastic book from Darryl Cunningham, covering topics as diverse as the Moon Landings and Evolution.

I'm a global warming skeptic (not regarding the science, but concerning the business motives of the people who stand to benefit from it) and it was great to see his take on such a complex subject, told brilliantly simply. Cunningham also manages to take age-old concepts such as the theory of evolution, and distill it down to basic principles that even the dimmest person would understand.

The most important aspect of these books is the research involved in each subject - and the wonderfully sublime illustrations he employs to convey broad, commonly-misunderstood ideas - and to present them in an enjoyable, entertaining format.

My 10-year-old son read the book after me, and loved every single page. It may even have convinced him that Nasa actually put men on the Moon.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good Precis on some Scientific "Controversies", 26 Dec. 2014
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Great overview on a number of hoaxes, frauds and misrepresentations of science. The art will be familiar to readers of other books by Darryl Cunningham, and the coverage of the subjects, while necessarily shallow (these are only introductions) is accurate. It may be that some of the reviewers claiming political bias in the coverage should remove the beam from their own eye before removing the mote from Mr Cunningham's...

Would have been 5 stars, but some of the material was also covered in "How to Fake a Moon Landing".

Tremendous value in the 12 Days of Kindle.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 29 Nov. 2014
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Okay but a bit disapointed.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not as thrilling as i'd hoped, 25 May 2013
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This review is from: Science Tales (Hardcover)
It outlines some famous issues in the world of science, but it didn't really grip me or educate me more than i allready know. I think it's best watch shows like panorama or listen to BBC radio 4 documentaries to learn new /current stuff which is a bit more thought provoking.
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4 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The epitome of cheap demagogic populist writing, 6 Dec. 2013
I was so much looking forward to read this book and finally when I had the time and space I was surprised to discovered that I'm reading a tabloid for teenagers who believe anything that is thrown at them and - just like the author - absolutely convinced that they are right..
The most cynical and unbelievable thing was what is written on the back of the book: 'Thoroughly researched'... I didn't know if that's a joke but in this world we live in today anybody can say that they 'thoroughly researched'.. Well, paraphrasing Einstein: It is all relative!
In my country England, there's a huge number of so-called 'progressive' 'liberal' 'clever' 'forward thinking' who love this type of conspiracy nonsense and this group is unfortunately getting bigger and bigger, taking over the little that's left from the crumbling liberalism that kept this country at the forefront for many years. It is now all about sensationalism, incompetent journalism, consumerism, OTT writing, superficiality and bad taste.
Unfortunately Mr. Cunningham and co. cunningly make their way and their money through exploiting people's desires to 'feel' they are well informed and that they know what's really going on in a 'cool' and simple way...
He thinks that we are stupid and he is succeeding.. But who is badly informed here? The reader? The writer?
Probably both.
The equation is very simple: the reader is buying the information and the author is earning it. Just like in banking, it is about money and power, hell with the costumers, hell with fair information - they don't know anything anyway so why not banking on it?

It is very clear to anybody with a basic general knowledge that the 'research' that was done before writing this book was maybe just scratching the surface of any standard or scientific evidence and that whoever publish this book is a total irresponsible populist who only saw one thing in front of their eyes: a great opportunity to make money by abusing the readers ignorance.
Instead of enriching us you made us (literally) poorer!
How disappointing.
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4 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pointless waste of paper, 6 Oct. 2012
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This review is from: Science Tales (Hardcover)
The cartoonist discusses some of the topical science issues of the day, in comic book form. Really he could have just printed the words in the speech bubbles as the pictures, such as they are, add nothing to the narrative, Mostly they are just talking heads. That would make for a verey slim book though. - perhaps just 2 sides of A4. Although the arguments are well summarised I think most people are surely aware of the points he makes, so you wont learn anything new. Might be appropriate gift for say a ten year old.

The french and to a lesser extent the Americans know who to do mature comics.
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Science Tales
Science Tales by Darryl Cunningham (Hardcover - 26 April 2012)
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