Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 28 May 2011
This is a review of the Kindle edition of "The Teacher's Tales of Terror" which only includes Chris Priestley's stories. It was originally published for World Book Day with Philip Reeve's "Traction City".

This short collection begins with an account of a mysterious supply teacher entertaining (and scaring) his class by telling them spooky stories for World Book Day. This story acts as a framing device for three others, as well as having a clever twist and providing the book's chilling final line.

Priestley is well versed in horror conventions and these are knowing tales in the tradition of Poe and M. R. James, best read by a roaring fire whilst the wind whips up a storm outside. Although written for children I thoroughly enjoyed them, and as a horror-loving child I would have adored them.

Readers familiar with Priestley will know what to expect: not very nice Victorian children becoming involved in sinister, ghostly, and sometimes horrific events. New readers who enjoy this taster have a treat in store as Priestley has published three other collections of tales: Uncle Montague's Tales of Terror,Tales of Terror from the Tunnel's Mouth, and Tales of Terror from the Black Ship. These come with the added bonus of David Roberts's beautiful Goreyesque illustrations.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 27 February 2013
This is really a single short story, with three embedded mini-stories. It only amounts to a 30 minute or so read, which I don't think is very clear from the description. The mini-stories aren't at all frightening, but I think that's the point - it allows for the juxtaposition between those fictional tales and the "terror" of the encompassing story. The more I think about it, the cleverer I think the structure of the work is. Still, it's a brief interesting distraction rather than something you ponder for days to come.

I'll have no trouble sleeping with the lights off tonight!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2011
The first thing that needs to be said is, these books, in my opinion, should not be taken too seriously. They are after all, first, to celebrate World Book Day, the second, they are tasters for the authors' main bodies of work.

Traction City - Philip Reeve. This lets us in on the basic setting for the bulk of the Mortal Engines series, and also allows us to see the loose, pacy writing style of Philip Reeve. It acts as a great teaser / tempter whatever, and I am sure many will be off to either Philip Reeve's page here, or on the bus to Waterstone's the second they put this book down. Ok, the story: a mad axeman of sorts (I know full well of course what he is, but perhaps it's unfair to go that far here) is on the rampage in the lower, rougher, dirtier denizens of rolling London. At the same time a suspected terrorist is apprehended, but is there a link? Read it to see. Back to the style; it's great that at times Mr Reeve abandons detailed descriptions, and it becomes a less is more caper. When you can pull of with aplomb calling a high tech weapon, 'An electric rifle thingy' then we know we have a great writer with us. Ok, take on board this is, as already said, a taster; it is not integral to events before or after, nor pivotal, you won't miss out if you never get this, but, it's a decent read in between the news and Corrie.

A Teacher's Tale of Terror - Chris Priestley. This is a different kettle of fish. The story features a character, a supply teacher, who turns up to teach for a day on one of those themed dressy up Victorian heritage days. He seems odd, out of place, sinister and unfriendly. He teaches a class, or rather, he reads stories to them, mild mysteries rather than true horror / terror. Of course things don't turn out quite the way you think, but - it's not that good, sadly. I simply do not know whether this is a 'Don't cast pearls ...' scenario and his 'proper' works are a gazillion times better, but, there is nothing here which would make many (in my opinion), do the scroll on here, or catch that bus to Waterstone's, ready with 'The complete unabridged works thus far of Chris Priestley, please, and make it snappy'. I am quite sure his main stuff is a gazillion times better, to be honest, but it is sadly not made apparent here. Three Stars methinks, and a tale you can sandwich in between Heir Hunters or those relentless real life medical emergency fillers, and Jeremy Kyle.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
This review is for the Kindle edition of "Teachers' Tales of Terror".

Although aimed at children these well crafted ghost stories have enough interest and chills to please an adult audience. Many of the protagonists in the stories are children, but this is to be expected. Nevertheless, the tales have suitably gothic settings: dark snowy streets, country houses at midnight and the narrow streets of Whitby. The author clearly understands how a classic ghost story works. For the price it's a must have.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 22 March 2011
I don't post reviews on Amazon to be honest but I feel the need to because there are a series of Sci-fi books that need a wider audience and more recognition (not that they havn't won awards anyway). This book is a short story written for World Book Day 2011 and set 20 years before Mortal Engines. I must say it was great to read a new story set in the time of the original books.

This is a good but brief (well it is a £!) introduction to the World of Mortal Engines (WoME) but as someone very familiar with that world it was still interesting, for me, and good to see a side to London I hadn't really seen before. it also acted as a slight tease for Scrivener's Moon and beyond possibly I thought. A pleasure to read all round! If you liked this then read Mortal Engines and its 3 sequels. The 3rd prequel Scrivener's Moon is out this year.

This a double book and the other story The Teacher's Tales of Terror was fun too!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The talent for writing that dark twist for a young adult is mind blowing when it comes to this man. He is the only author were I become depressed when I finish his book. I am an avid reader and when I was younger I craved this type of story layout and setting. If I could sit and read this gentleman's material every day for the rest of my life, I would positively do so with great enjoyment.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 9 February 2013
This absorbing story will while away an hour or two. The author explores some intriguing plot lines and certainly shows much promise but one can't help wondering if the conclusions to some of the tales (these are stories within a story) are not always completely satisfying and that the entire exercise is perhaps not a little rushed. A worthy and entertaining read nevertheless.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 26 October 2014
I loved how each story was linked together, all wrapped up in a story in itself. Not a dud amongst them and not having heard of Chris Priestley before I immediately went searching for more of his work as soon as I'd finished this one - one of my new favourite authors. If you like your spooky tales well paced, engrossing and with a twist in them, this is highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 30 September 2013
This is a great little 'extra' especially for anyone who's a fan of the original series. Slightly lighter in tone, though probably as it was published for World Book Day and so aimed at younger children, here are three more great tales (with a wrap-around story) to keep you going, until you discover 'Christmas Tales of Terror'!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 21 January 2013
This is a well written collection of stories that kept the pupils' attention. But there is an extra jolt for the teacher (and the reader) at the end of the collection. Each story stands alone and none should be read by folk of a nervous temperament. Scary stuff for a lonely evening by the fire.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Tales of Terror from the Tunnel's Mouth
Tales of Terror from the Tunnel's Mouth by Chris Priestley (Paperback - 7 Mar. 2011)
£6.99

The Dead of Winter
The Dead of Winter by Chris Priestley (Paperback - 3 Oct. 2011)
£5.99

Tales of Terror from the Black Ship
Tales of Terror from the Black Ship by Chris Priestley (Paperback - 7 Mar. 2011)
£6.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.