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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Douay-Rheims-Challoner Version Remains One of the Two Foremost Bibles of Choice for English-Speaking Readers, 2 Jan 2009
By 
Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada) - See all my reviews
The Douay-Rheims Bible, for those who have used it carefully and comparatively along with others of the relatively few reliable Bibles in English (there being far too many translations of a loosely paraphrastic, liberal bias-affected, and/or sloppily translated quality), whether of Roman Catholic or Protestant provenance. That holy missionary bishop of difficult times, Richard Challoner, immensely improved the text of the Douay-Rheims Bible; critics of the Douay-Rheims often ignore his contribution and only refer to the Douay-Rheims as it first was published in the years before the Authorised "King James" Bible (of 1611) appeared and before Bp. Challoner's great and scholarly improvements. The only Roman Catholic Bible that is on its level is the Confraternity Version, which, alas, the mediocre New American Bible displaced, to sad effect; the translation by Ronald Knox, also from the Latin Vulgate, has much literary merit (as, of course, the Douay-Rheims does as Challoner revised it), but cannot compare to the accuracy and reliability of the Douay-Rheims or Confraternity Bibles. The Jerusalem and New Jerusalem Bibles have much merit, and are translated, for the N.T. (and also the deutero-canonical books of the O.T. books), from the Greek, but even they have to cede place of honour to the Douay-Rheims Bible and the Confraternity Version (the latter being, of course, based on Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts along with an healthy regard for the Latin of the Clementine Vulgate).

The Latin text that underlies the Douay-Rheims Version is superior to the tawdry, corrupted Greek "critical texts" (usually the numerous editions of the Nestlé/Aland or the United Bible Societies texts, all having a liberal and Westcott-Hort corrupt preponderance of often quite aberrant readings for the New Testament). It truly is better to translate from the Clementine Vulgate's fine Latin text than from tarnished Greek "critical texts" that betray the sacred words of the New Testament, even if, ideally, it is best to translate faithfully from the Textus Receptus or Majority Text of the N.T., which the A.V./K.J.V. with such supreme authority and probity.

And the Douay-Rheims is a genuinely beautiful translation of God's word; as Challoner revised it, it rivals the stellar beauty of the A.V./K.J.V. that always has set the literary standard for the English Bible, and in some passages even surpasses the K.J.V. Baronius Press' beautifully printed and luxuriously bound edition (between a choice of variously coloured fine leather covers) of the Douay-Rheims-Challoner Version is perhaps the finest in physical quality presently available for purchase. Some typographical errors do mar it here and there, which may encourage some buyers to seek out another edition, e.g. those, in various bindings (including a sturdy paperback edition at a favourably low price), which TAN Books & Publishers has reprinted. This reviewer gives a more detailed assessment of the Douay-Rheims-Challoner Version in his Amazon user's review for some of TAN Books' editions.

One can only hope that traditionalist Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox and Protestants return to the twin jewels of literary beauty and accuracy that the Douay-Rheims-Challoner and Authorised Version Bibles represent, now as had been the case for centuries in the past.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very impressed!!!!!!!!, 5 Oct 2004
This review is from: The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate (Bonded Leather)
This edition of the Douay-Rheims Bible is quite simply the most beautifully presented book I have ever seen. The hardback binding is covered in Moroccan leather. The pages are of a remarkable quality making the bible a lot thicker than normal.
The Douay-Rheims version is easily as impressive as the King James version and is far more literal and accurate. I have 14 versions of the Bible and this is certainly going to be my preferred version for life!
Very, very impressive quality; quite remarkable for the price. Some of Oxford's leather bound Bibles are comparable but this Bible is definitely the best.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Luckily, The Supremely Great Douay-Rheims-Challoner Bible Is Available in Good Editions from Baronius & Also from TAN Books, 29 Nov 2006
By 
Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate (Bonded Leather)
The Douay-Rheims Bible, for those who have used it carefully and comparatively along with others of the relatively few truly reliable Bibles in English (there being far too many translations of a loosely paraphrastic, liberal bias-affected, and/or sloppily translated quality), whether of Roman Catholic or Protestant provenance. Fortunately, the rock-solid Douay-Rheims-Challoner Bible still is available in a choice of editions and bindings, Baronius' edition the most elegant and, due to improvements upon the orthography of the text that it reprints, even more readable than less expensive editions, such as any of TAN's hardback or paperback editions or printings (whatever date any of them bears, often more a matter of printing date than of siginificant dated edition variance). If Baronius' luxurious and costly leather-bound edition is too expensive for the buyter, TAN's is quite reasonably priced, if obtained from an American source; if purchased in the United Kingdom or in the Dominion of Canada (according, resspectively, to Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.ca) TAN's editions sell for up to three times the price listed for the United States, thus for buyers who opt for an U.S.A. source, TAN Books' hardback and paperback editions are all the more the best buy, for price combined with quite sufficiently good quality and durability, of the various range of options for obtaining a currently available edition of this surpassingly fine and lovely translation. Baronius Press has the most luxurious edition on the market, with improved type-face, but TAN's hardback and paperback editions or printings of those only slightly different editions, however dated, at their U.S. prices, will be the choice of most buyers of moderate means. If one can afford the beautiful Baronius edition, however, it will be that much more a treasure to cherish for one's entire life!

That holy missionary bishop of difficult times, Richard Challoner, immensely improved the text of the Douay-Rheims Bible. Critics of the Douay-Rheims often ignore his contribution and only refer to the Douay-Rheims as it first was published in the years before the Authorised "King James" Bible (of 1611) appeared and before Bp. Challoner made his great and scholarly improvements to the Douay-Rheims Bible. The only Roman Catholic Bible that is on its level is the Confraternity Version, which, alas, the mediocre New American Bible displaced on the market-place, to sad effect. The translation by Ronald Knox, also from the Clementine Latin Vulgate, has much literary merit (as, of course, the Douay-Rheims came to have as Challoner so gracefully revised it), but cannot compare to the accuracy and reliability of the Douay-Rheims-Challoner or Confraternity Bibles, since Knox' translation method was rather too free at times. The Jerusalem and New Jerusalem Bibles have much merit (including literarily), and are translated, for the New Testament (and also for the deutero-canonical books of the O.T. books), from the Greek (alas, in one of the mutilated "critical texts that modernist scholars wrongly prefer to the Ecclesiastical Greek "Received" Text, also called the "Textus Receptus", of the N.T.), but even they have to cede place of honour to the Douay-Rheims-Challoner and Confraternity Versions (the latter being, of course, based on Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts along with an healthy regard for the Latin of the Clementine Vulgate).

The Clementine Latin text, that underlies the Douay-Rheims Version, as already noted above, is superior to the tawdry, corrupted Greek "critical texts" (usually the numerous editions of the Nestlé/Aland or the United Bible Societies texts of the New Testament, all having a liberal and Westcott-Hort corrupt preponderance of often quite aberrant readings for the New Testament). It truly is better to translate from the Clementine Vulgate's fine Latin text than from tarnished Greek "critical texts", which tend to be more extreme than the more cautious critical text that underlies the Confraternity Version's New Testament) that betray the sacred words of the New Testament, even if, ideally, it is best to translate faithfully from the Textus Receptus or Majority Text of the N.T., as the translators of the A.V./K.J.V., with such supreme authority and probity, so did.

There are minor divergences between the American and British Douay-Rheims-Challoner texts, which have varied somewhat in editions over the years published in both countries. Good editions of British texts of the Douay-Rheims-Challoner translation long were available, including in inexpensive editions, from the Catholic Truth Society (C.T.S.). This reader's collection includes the C.T.S. edition in relatively small (but stoutly thick) format published in 1956 (with imprimatur and preface dated 1955), which states on the verso of the title page and in the preface, that modifications to the British Challoner text of 1955 are due to "certain emendations, mainly of a grammatical nature, to the [then] current Douay texts ... [and also] to provide for easier reading." Most traditionalist Roman Catholic and other readers probably will prefer the older 1899 American text, for which TAN Books and Baronius Press alike have opted to print or to reprint, to the slightly different 1955 or other British text. The prefaces of TAN Books' hardcover and later paperback editions differ, the latter lengthier, accounting for the 2000 paperback TAN edition's description as being an "Enlarged Softcover Edition", a difference that would affect few readers' choice to make a choice between these TAN editions. The buyer can always "tip in" a photocopy of the preface to the other edition, as this reader has done, to have both under one cover. Of course, Baronius' edition does not pose this wealth of forematter in varying editions or printings as is the case with TAN Books, since Baronius offers, so far, only one choice from its presses of edition or printing.

When all has been said, the Douay-Rheims, undeniably to the unprejudiced and discerning reader, is a genuinely beautiful translation of God's word; as Challoner revised the translation, it rivals even the stellar beauty of the A.V./K.J.V. that always has set the literary standard for the English Bible, and in some passages even surpasses the K.J.V. That is in no small part due to Challoner's effort to import into the Douay-Rheims Bible much of the beauty and clarity of expression in the Authorised Version; he succeeded in upgrading the style of the Douay-Rheims Bible without bowing to the A.V.'s slight Protestant/Anglican bias in certain passages. All who love the Bible should have both. The Christian should keep in mind that the A.V./K.J.V. included, in its Apocrypha, the deutero-canonical books of the Old Testament (as well as three biblical books or portions included only in the appendix of the Latin Vulgate Bible, but too often omitted in the deutero-canon of Roman Catholic Bibles as generally printed in Latin or as translated, and, when they do include the Apocrypha at all, as also omitted from the Apocrypha of Lutheran Bibles as well); some editions (albeit a bit hard to find in bookstores) of the A.V. Bible, mostly for the sake of Anglicans, Eastern Orthodox, and for some Lutherans, still include the Apocrypha.

One can only hope that traditionalist Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, and Protestants return to the twin jewels of literary beauty and accuracy that the Douay-Rheims-Challoner and Authorised Version Bibles represent, now as had been the case for centuries in the past.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Simply Beautiful!, 5 Sep 2011
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This review is from: The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate (Bonded Leather)
I own a number of bibles and this one is my favourite. The asthetics of the book itself are beautiful, everything a bible should be, and the translation and language are wonderful. A truly inspirational bible.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very nice, however ..., 15 Jan 2011
This review is from: The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate (Bonded Leather)
Very nice, however ...

Very nice looking book,
written in "plain" English, very good translation.
High quality digital print, nice pictures and maps.
Bible is very thick, nice expensive looking design.
However,
text pages are from ultra thin paper and book requires very careful handling.
Black leather covered hardback is rather soft. Leather does not feel, or smell, like real leather.
Book overall and its paper just does not feel or smell like "real" books usually do.
This is why, I'd give only 4 stars.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Bible, 26 Jan 2009
By 
N. B. Croad (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate (Bonded Leather)
This is mostly a very accurate translation. Although a translation of a translation this does not detract from its accuracy, and far surpasses modern versions intended to replace it. Readers of modern/protestant versions will find some of the names of the books a bit odd and the numbering of the Psalms becomes slightly out of sync, but again does not detract from it. Readers will find the Georgian English slightly more intelligable than that of the King James Bible and there are notes at the bottom of each page to explain passages of text that would be lost to all but the most erudite of scholars. There are lovely woodcut drawings scattered throughout and a super bible atlas in the back. This is a very valuable historical alternative to the King James Bible, whose original first edition actually pre-dates the KJV. If only folk knew how inaccurate modern versions are.

Interestingly some of the wording is similar to the Wycliffe bible of 1395.

And just one more thing. Since this Bible is translated from Jerome's Vulgate, it is well to remember that the Vulgate was translated from texts more akin to the Textus Receptus than the modern perversions translated from the Nestle/Aland text originally made up by a couple of blokes in the 19th century. However it is not the textus receptus and Jerome must have used some texts no longer available to us as well as something like the Alexandrian type texts prevalent at the time.
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The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate
The Holy Bible: Douay-Rheims Version: Translated from the Latin Vulgate by Richard Challoner (Bonded Leather - 1 Oct 2003)
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