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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seances with God
I am a non-animal based medical research scientist and therefore have high expectations of any book I have time to read. I found this book an excellent read and could not put the book down.The research that went into this book was phenomenal and it was laid out in a way that persons of all levels can understand regarding life after death, religions and mediumship...
Published on 30 July 2005 by Dr A C Hunt

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3.0 out of 5 stars Seances with God
I found this book to be interesting, but not that interesting. Part of the problem was centred on its style: it was very self-consciously attempting to appear academic. At times it was overy repetitious. I was more aware of the style than the content at times. As to the content, it was thought-provoking. At times I was bored, then put the book away for a while, and then...
Published on 7 Feb 2012 by Mr. B. George


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seances with God, 30 July 2005
By 
Dr A C Hunt (Glasgow, Strathclyde United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Seances with God: God Through the Ages (Paperback)
I am a non-animal based medical research scientist and therefore have high expectations of any book I have time to read. I found this book an excellent read and could not put the book down.The research that went into this book was phenomenal and it was laid out in a way that persons of all levels can understand regarding life after death, religions and mediumship. Examples of mediumship were given from the begiinning of time to present day which were real eye openers, including the messages tot he American President which caused him to end slavery!! This book makes clear that messages from the other realm underlie many of the world's spiritual religions. An encyclopaedic bible for anyone interested in psychic phenomena.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening, 4 Feb 2007
By 
Michael E. Tymn "Michael Tymn" (Kailua, Hawaii) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Seances with God: God Through the Ages (Paperback)
Although much of orthodox religion looks upon mediumship as the work of the devil, a strong case can be made that messages received through mediumship are the very foundation of organized religion. In Séances with God (subtitled God Through the Ages), Jacqueline Jones-Hunt, Ph.D., makes that case, offering an abundance of evidence suggesting that what today is known as mediumship went by different names in earlier times. "Besides the term medium and the more recent channel, other names have included shaman, witch doctor, healer, and medicine man in native cultures," she points out. "They have also been called fortune-tellers, oracles, seers, soothsayers, savants, and visionaries. In religious contexts, they have been known as priests, gurus, prophets, saints, mystics, and holy ones." She adds in light workers, initiates, teachers, adepts, and masters as names applied by esoteric schools.

Dr. Jones-Hunt, a member of the London-based Society for Psychical Research and the the Scottish Society for Psychical Research, begins with an overview of mediumship and related paranormal phenomena. She discusses fraud, cryptomnesia, the "game-playing demon theory," possession, obsession, Super-ESP, clairvoyance, trance, automatic writing, psychical research, the cross-correspondences, and various other aspects of spirit communication or purported spirit communication. She goes on to explore mediumship in ancient Egypt, Greece, India, China, and Japan. It was interesting to note an ancient Chinese author quoted: "Among men the dead speak through living persons whom they throw into a trance; and the wu, thrumming their black chords, call down the souls of the dead, which then speak through the mouths of the wu." The author doesn't mention it, but one has to wonder if this is the origin of the modern "woo-woo" reference to things mysterious.

Jones-Hunt points out that our ancient ancestors often bequeathed the status of god or gods upon otherworldly communicators. The ancestor worship in Japan is believed to have resulted from such spirit communication. The Greeks, including Pythagoras, Plato, and Plotinus, often deified their ethereal communications, the author adds, stating that "they would progressively gain spiritual and eschatological knowledge from these communicators. Their objective was to contribute to humankind's attainment of spiritual progress, thereby emancipating them from the endless wheel of rebirth and therefore ultimately restoring them to their rightful and original habitat in the Heavenly realm."

In discussing shamanism in such diverse places as North America, Hawaii, Indonesia, Siberia, and Oceania, Jones-Hunt draws upon other researchers in showing how the shamanistic altered states of consciousness were much the same as those of more recent mystics and mediums as well as out-of-body experiencers and remote viewers. She devotes a full chapter to the Emanuel Swedenborg, the renowned 18th Century scientist and inventor turned seer and mystic, discussing the parallels between his apparent clairvoyance and out-of-body travel with shamanism and more recent mediumship.

Much of the author's research was devoted to investigating the apparent mediumistic phenomena in the Bible. She suggests that much biblical terminology, such as God spoke, the lord spoke, the lord appeared, the angel of the lord was upon him, the gifts of the spirit, talking in tongues, enquire of the lord, can be interpreted as communication with spirits. Moreover, Yahweh and "the Lord" may have been celestial messengers rather than an anthropomorphic deity. "Modern observers of mediumistic phenomena are empowered not to perceive these narratives as subjective pictorial images but as objective experiences of communications." Jones-Hunt writes, adding that various books of the Old Testament which appear to prohibit mediumship are likely the result of misunderstanding, misinterpretation and mistranslations and are inconsistent with New Testament passages saying that the spirits should be tested and their messages discerned.

Likewise, there appear to be frequent references to the mediumistic trance state in the Bible, such as in Job where it states when deep sleep falls on men and For God does speak - now one way, now another - though man may not perceive it, in a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falls on men. In the New Testament, we read in Acts that Peter went on the roof to pray...fell into a trance...then a voice told him. Jones-Hunt suggests, as many other students of the Bible have, that Jesus chose his disciples based on their mediumistic gifts.

Jones-Hunt stresses that the stories of spirit contact through the ages do not offer absolute proof of survival beyond physical death, but they certainly offer strong evidence in that direction. "The historically memorable spiritual biblical figures laid the foundation stones for spiritual and eschatological teachings," she concludes. "The underlying unifying theme of these past and present mediumistic experiences, is that they teach that a God exists, that non-material existence occurs after death for all creatures, that forms of punishment do occur in keeping with perfect non-personal natural laws...that contact can be accessed during the material life and that these experiences can raise humankind's spiritual consciousness."

The Foreword of the book is written by Archie E. Roy, professor emeritus of astronomy at Glasgow University. "In our superior wisdom we smile pityingly at those who still clutch at the drifting matchwood raft of religion in all its many worldwide forms and dare not learn to swim stoically in the ocean of truth, accepting the reality that we are simply clever animals, our minds but the brain in action, struggling to survive in an aloof, uncaring physical world," Roy writes, going on to say that the "purest unmuddied stream of those teachings - the perennial philosophy - can be discerned as a consensus given by the highest of those teachers and sensitives - love one another; do unto others as you would have them do unto you; as ye sow so shall ye reap."

If only orthodox religion would open its mind to what Dr. Jones-Hunt so clearly discusses in this book, perhaps we might see a true and much needed spiritual reawakening in the world. If only...
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2.0 out of 5 stars HARDGOING, 9 Mar 2014
This review is from: Seances with God: God Through the Ages (Paperback)
I had high hopes for this book as an avid reader of all things spiritual, but it is repetitive and very - very - wordy, with a dry uninteresting approach to the subject history. Not recommended.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Seances with God, 7 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. B. George (Glasgow, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Seances with God: God Through the Ages (Paperback)
I found this book to be interesting, but not that interesting. Part of the problem was centred on its style: it was very self-consciously attempting to appear academic. At times it was overy repetitious. I was more aware of the style than the content at times. As to the content, it was thought-provoking. At times I was bored, then put the book away for a while, and then returned again. I suppose that the points that the book was making can be neither proved nor disproved; they are but suggestions for the mind to muse over. I give this book a qualified recommendation.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last the Spirit is back into man made religions, 23 Aug 2010
This review is from: Seances with God: God Through the Ages (Paperback)
I was not going to bother writing a review even though I enjoyed this thought provoking book so much. I borrowed it from a friend of mine and immediately new I must have a copy myself. When I went to the Amazon website I saw 2 excellent reviews which mirror my own opinion but found a completely unjustified rude objectionable review the bilious content of which could only be driven by ignorance and craven professional jealousy.
Dr Jones-Hunt PhD has 20 excellent reviews by internationally renowned academics in this field and I understand from Amazon that this book was sold out within two years. Need I say more but to contrast these glittering reviews with the discourteous ramblings of someone called Jocko who clearly has no literary, educatonal or social pedigree.
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