Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good introduction to the artist and his work, 2 Oct 2013
By 
Dr R (Norwich, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: William Orpen (Lives of Irish Painters) (Hardcover)
`Lives of Irish Artists' is a short series of books about modern Irish artists, from north and south of the border. They are a handy size, 12cm x 22cm, with 27 pages, 17 of text and 10 of colour illustrations, each accompanied by a short commentary. The essay is divided into chronological periods, each being reflected in the series of illustrations.

The book on William Orpen, 1878-1931, has been written by Bruce Arnold. Orpen had a greater influence on Irish art, through his teaching, than any other painter, was amongst the most successful portraitists of his time and was greatly affected by his experiences of trench warfare when he was an official war artist in the First World War. `Background and Education', at the age of 13, Orpen went to the Metropolitan School of Art and, in the 6 years he was there, he won every honour open to him. In 1898, he entered the Slade School of Art in London where he was again the outstanding student; `The Early Works', Orpen was able to paint in any historical style and to incorporate a gesture or a painterly detail into any work. Between 1900-06 he was influenced by Velázquez whose work he had seen in Madrid and he also painted a number of self-portraits. In retrospect, this points to his later success as a commissioned portraitist. He painted a great many nudes, in all cases delving into the sitter's character rather than just painting beautifully. Orpen's wife, Grace, was also artistic and the artist regularly drew her and their children. From 1902, he taught at his old school, the Metropolitan School of Art; `The War Years and After' in 1916, the artist went to the Western Front, continued to record what he saw until the Peace Conference concluded in 1920 and, as a result, he produced the greatest amount of war art ever, even more than Goya. This experience caused him to hate the political class that he considered were responsible for the carnage and, by the mid-1920s he was burnt-out and his work became formulaic, he took to drink, left his family and became increasingly reclusive.

The illustrations cover Orpen's career, "The Mirror", 1900, shows an early model, Emily Scobel, whom he hoped to marry, and is influenced by Dutch 17th century interiors; "The Bedroom", 1900, was painted in Normandy with the same influence and model; the portrait of Augustus John, 1900, was disliked by the sitter but this may have been a result of professional jealously; "The Wash House", 1905, was influenced by Velázquez and shows a new model Lottie Stafford, a real washerwoman; "A Woman", 1906, is one of the greatest English nudes, and is illustrated on the front cover; "Mrs St George", 1912, was painted without the use primary colours. The sitter exerted a great influence on the artist and became his mistress; "Early Morning", 1922, shows Yvonne Aubicq, a very popular model with gallery viewers; "Marshall Foch", 1918, the sitter was greatly admired by the painter and painted him in a relaxed, human and unheroic manner; "Sunlight", c. 1925, behind the figure pulling her stockings on, Orpen has painted his Monet hanging on the wall, indicating his success and wealth.

This is an excellent series, an introduction to the artist, with just enough illustrations to show the artist's style and development.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A very good introduction to the artist and his work, 2 Oct 2013
By 
Dr R (Norwich, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: William Orpen (Lives of Irish Painters) (Hardcover)
`Lives of Irish Artists' is a short series of books about modern Irish artists, from north and south of the border. They are a handy size, 12cm x 22cm, with 27 pages, 17 of text and 10 of colour illustrations, each accompanied by a short commentary. The essay is divided into chronological periods, each being reflected in the series of illustrations.

The book on William Orpen, 1878-1931, has been written by Bruce Arnold. Orpen had a greater influence on Irish art, through his teaching, than any other painter, was amongst the most successful portraitists of his time and was greatly affected by his experiences of trench warfare when he was an official war artist in the First World War. `Background and Education', at the age of 13, Orpen went to the Metropolitan School of Art and, in the 6 years he was there, he won every honour open to him. In 1898, he entered the Slade School of Art in London where he was again the outstanding student; `The Early Works', Orpen was able to paint in any historical style and to incorporate a gesture or a painterly detail into any work. Between 1900-06 he was influenced by Velázquez whose work he had seen in Madrid and he also painted a number of self-portraits. In retrospect, this points to his later success as a commissioned portraitist. He painted a great many nudes, in all cases delving into the sitter's character rather than just painting beautifully. Orpen's wife, Grace, was also artistic and the artist regularly drew her and their children. From 1902, he taught at his old school, the Metropolitan School of Art; `The War Years and After' in 1916, the artist went to the Western Front, continued to record what he saw until the Peace Conference concluded in 1920 and, as a result, he produced the greatest amount of war art ever, even more than Goya. This experience caused him to hate the political class that he considered were responsible for the carnage and, by the mid-1920s he was burnt-out and his work became formulaic, he took to drink, left his family and became increasingly reclusive.

The illustrations cover Orpen's career, "The Mirror", 1900, shows an early model, Emily Scobel, whom he hoped to marry, and is influenced by Dutch 17th century interiors; "The Bedroom", 1900, was painted in Normandy with the same influence and model; the portrait of Augustus John, 1900, was disliked by the sitter but this may have been a result of professional jealously; "The Wash House", 1905, was influenced by Velázquez and shows a new model Lottie Stafford, a real washerwoman; "A Woman", 1906, is one of the greatest English nudes, and is illustrated on the front cover; "Mrs St George", 1912, was painted without the use primary colours. The sitter exerted a great influence on the artist and became his mistress; "Early Morning", 1922, shows Yvonne Aubicq, a very popular model with gallery viewers; "Marshall Foch", 1918, the sitter was greatly admired by the painter and painted him in a relaxed, human and unheroic manner; "Sunlight", c. 1925, behind the figure pulling her stockings on, Orpen has painted his Monet hanging on the wall, indicating his success and wealth.

This is an excellent series, an introduction to the artist, with just enough illustrations to show the artist's style and development.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

William Orpen (Lives of Irish Painters)
William Orpen (Lives of Irish Painters) by National Gallery of Ireland (Hardcover - May 1991)
Used & New from: £3.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews