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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC!
A fantastically moving novel. The images were so vivid I really felt part of the novel. This book evokes so many emotions, I laughed and cried. I could not stop turning the pages. All the characters were brilliant, especially Queen Hatshepsut, as so little is actually known about this only female pharoah, yet Pauline Gedge has really brought her alive. This is a...
Published on 8 Nov 1999

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars I love the story but the physical book itself started to ...
I love the story but the physical book itself started to fall apart from the first few pages. Not a very sturdy book.
Published 4 months ago by Helen


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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC!, 8 Nov 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
A fantastically moving novel. The images were so vivid I really felt part of the novel. This book evokes so many emotions, I laughed and cried. I could not stop turning the pages. All the characters were brilliant, especially Queen Hatshepsut, as so little is actually known about this only female pharoah, yet Pauline Gedge has really brought her alive. This is a fantastic book, and the first Pauline Gedge novel I have read, I have now invested in 5 more! I study Egyptology, and find that this book is very realistic and very well researched, down to the smallest detail such as Egyptian clothing and food. AMAZING...MUST BE READ!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent! It made me laugh and it made me cry!, 16 Jun 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
This book is wonderful. It brought to life the wonder that was Ancient Egypt and the power of the woman who crowned herself Pharoah. I love the way that Ms. Gedge makes the reader feel to be a part of the story...I was able to feel the pain and joy of all the characters. As for the characters, they were all very real and complex; there was nothing two dimensional about any of them. I especially enjoyed the character of Senmut, watching him rise through the ranks to eventually become hereditary Prince of Egypt. All in all, this story is excellent and I highly recomend it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written Bio of the great Queen Hatshepsut of Egypt, 13 Dec 2008
By 
gilly8 "gilly8" (Mars, the hotspot of the U.S.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
Pauline Gedge writes the most atmospheric, beautiful books on ancient Egypt. You feel as if you are there and part of the living breathing people around you. She paints the picture of the time, place, and people whether peasants or kings believably.

This book is a recreation of the life of one of the most unlikely real people of history: the Pharaoh Hatshepsut, a woman Pharaoh, who ruled for 22 peaceful, prosperous years. (NOTE: ignore the "product review" note on this book, its just not accurate.)

Little is known about the actual Hatshepsut as after her death those pharaohs who followed her did everything possible to destroy every remnant of her existance. Her name was gouged out of rock on palaces and monuments. Her face was destroyed in statuary. Her entire reign was, for many many years, a mere rumor.

Finally she was gradually rediscovered, and only last year her mummy was found, a great moment for Egyptian history.

Pauline Gedge has take the little that is known and put flesh and blood on the bare bones of the story as we have it so far. This book is so lovingly and beautifully drawn, Hatshepsut, the bright, happy child, the powerful leader, the lover of the commoner Senmut, has been made into a woman one would like to have known.

For me, this is one of my all time favorite books.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely fantastic!, 23 Aug 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
As a lover of ancient Egypt, I wanted to read a book that really brought me into the story of the heroic egyptian queen who became the first and only female pharoh. Pauline Gedge is a wonderful historian who paints the most vivid picture of what life, love, power and ambition really is and means. I have read all of her books and this is by far my favorite!!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book I read!!!, 14 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
I had loved Egypt since I was a little girl, but, when I read this book, at 11 years old, I really decided to be an egyptologist. If you read it you can feel that you are living in ancient Egypt, that you are really there, and, that you are Hatshepsut`s friend. I think Pauline would have been her friend if they had live in the same time, just as any reader of the book would be. Now I'm 16 and I would like yo say thanks to Pauline because with that book she change my life. There's nothing else I can say.....It is the best book I've ever read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A feminist in ancient Egypt!, 20 Jun 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
This book is a definite classic. Wonderful characters and incredible atmosphere make this certainly one of the best ancient Egypt novel written. I fell in love with the little queen and loved her story. Gedge has a knack for creating stories that always make you want to keep reading but not wanting it to end!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Top Ten Favourite, 7 Aug 2013
By 
L. Odell "little me" (Leeds) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Paperback)
Originally published in 1977 - I read this wonderful book in the early 1980s - and it has remained in my top ten favourite novels ever since (Gedge's 'Eagle and the Raven', and 'Stargate' are also there with it). Looking back now after the passage of 30 years, one of the things that peaks my interest is that, when originally pubished, very, very little was known about the life and death Hatshepsut. In the intervening years, a great deal has been discovered - and for the most part Ms Gedge's view of events have proved to be amazingly accurate. Some aspects are still contentious, particularly relating to the death of the Pharaoh-Queen - but given the track record (in this, and other novels) for getting lost historical incidents spot on - I'm happy to go along believing in the ending of the book - and the academics will have to prove to me that it's wrong!
(What I'd love now from Ms Gedge is a novel of Smenkhare - of whom I've seen an interesting, complex, and quite convincing theory that (s)he might actually have been Nefertiti - thus the second woman Pharaoh.)
More, please!
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5.0 out of 5 stars I love this book, 19 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Child of the Morning (Paperback)
Great detail and even better story telling. You really feel like you are actually there, in ancient Egypt. Great read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pauline Gedge is Fabulous, 24 Sep 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Child of the Morning (Hera) (Paperback)
My first encounter with Ms. Gedge was through a book entitled "Mirage". From the first chapter till now I have been a willing captive of her stories. "Child of the Morning" is a wonderful and sad story of one of the greatest queen's Egypt ever had.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High quality writing and intensively researched, 14 Oct 2010
By 
Iset (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Child of the Morning (Paperback)
Getting the sole bad point about this book out of the way first, some of the information on which Gedge bases the book we now know is inaccurate. Gedge, for example, has an enmity between Hatshepsut and Thothmes III, her nephew/step-son. This enmity was previously deduced from the evidence that the erasure of Hatshepsut's names from the king list occurred in Thothmes III's reign. But we know at present date that the chiselling out of her name occurred at the very end of his reign - hardly a rash act of impassioned hatred for his stepmother. Rather, it now appears that he had her names erased simply because a female Pharaoh contravened the idea of Ma'at (the Egyptian idea of order and the right way of things), and not because of any personal grudge or enmity. We also know now that whilst Hatshepsut claims in her monuments that her father, Thothmes I, intended for her to succeed him, this is a claim after the event, and no evidence from the actual time suggests anything other than Thothmes intended for his son to become the next Pharaoh. Hatshepsut made this claim years after the actual event, in order to reinforce her right to the Double Crown. There's a very good reason why I haven't marked the book down, despite this, whereas I might count it against a recently released novel, and that's because at the time Gedge was writing this book, in the mid-70's, the accepted theory of the time was exactly as Gedge portrays it and she can hardly be faulted for discoveries years and decades later revealing to us that this was not the case.

Hatshepsut, the protagonist, more than has the personality to carry the book. A young girl robust, curious, and outspoken, she grows into a woman driven, determined, and diligent. Hers is a strong personality, and she carries herself with a confidence and complete belief in her right to be Pharaoh as the Daughter of Amun. Common sense combines with intelligence to produce a diligent governance of Egypt. Her dominant personality overshadows everyone around her, especially other women - even when compared to Aset, who undoubtedly has her own physical appeals. Her submission to Thothmes, however, instead of getting rid of him, is somewhat disappointing, although of course Gedge had to stick to historical accuracy. Senmut is undoubtedly the secondary character, and some of the action is seen through his eyes, when we are not looking over Hatshepsut's shoulder. The controversial advisor has been portrayed here by Gedge as likable, rather than ambitious, and indeed he is. From a humble peasant, to we'eb priest, to architect, and hereditary prince, we are cheering for his rise throughout. His loyalty to Hatshepsut is absolute, as she is both cause of his good fortune, the woman he loves, and the upholder of Ma'at in Egypt.

Thothmes II is not an unlikable character, but he is certainly not one of admiration. He is lazy and enjoys a living in the lap of luxury. He struggles with both his academic education and his martial training, and even as Pharaoh he shies away from the tasks of government and going into battle personally. And yet Thothmes is more perceptive than most of the other characters give him credit for, and where he is a mouse in battle, Hatshepsut is surprised to find that he is a man in the bedroom, with a certain quality of charisma in this arena. Aset is another character worthy of note. She is sharp, like Hatshepsut, but where Hatshepsut is intelligent, she is cunning, where Hatshepsut exerts her authority in the open, she cultivates it insidiously behind bedroom doors... both dangerous but in different ways.

Thothmes III is the antagonist to Hatshepsut's protagonist at the end of the book, but in many ways he is a lot like her. He's incredibly sharp and intelligent, he takes an active hand in the governance of Egypt, he excels in both academic and martial pursuits, and holds a confidence all his own. The only difference is that he seems to be much more eager for war, where as Hatshepsut promotes peace. I would disagree with this portrayal though. At the time Gedge wrote the book the idea of Hatshepsut as a female ruler avoiding war and promoting peace, and Thothmes III as a red-blooded male war-monger, was a very popular perspective, but the truth was quite different. Hatshepsut never shied away from war, and did not promote peace because of her femininity, in fact she recognised that being a war leader was an important part of being Pharaoh. Conversely, Thothmes, though he was indeed a warrior-king, did not ruin Egypt with war, but won many victories and conquered for Egypt a sizeable empire. In any case, this creation of strong opponents to face Hatshepsut brought the tension of the story alive.

There's a good dose of action, but the book is more heavily weighted by character relationships. As with all of her books, Gedge makes sure that all her characters are fleshed out and given depth and realism, and don't appear as stereotypes, caricatures, or shallow and two-dimensional. Dialogue perfectly suits each character, not a line out of place. It's obvious that Gedge spends a lot of time and care in creating her characters, and by the time the book is published knows them like the back of her hand. Altogether, her research was, as ever, extensive and contributes to the wonderful level of detail in the descriptions - environments brought to vivid life, rich and fascinating culture of Ancient Egypt, and the vital characters.
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Child of the Morning (Hera)
Child of the Morning (Hera) by Pauline Gedge (Paperback - 31 Dec 1998)
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