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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Backwards and forwards in time, the Andreasson Investigation deepens
Ray Fowler's second book in the series analyzing the long and complex case of Betty Andreasson-Luca and her family was originally published in 1982, the same year as Budd Hopkins' "Missing Time" but five years before Hopkins' landmark book "Intruders" with which it shares some common themes and methodology.

In many ways this second book about the Andreasson...
Published on 7 Nov. 2010 by The Guardian

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but problematic
This second book about the abduction experiences of Betty Andreasson Luca and her husband Bob Luca proves much more fascinating than the initial book. In a sense, this book is a prequel to its predecessor because it deals with alleged abductions experienced during Betty's childhood. What continues to set the Andreasson Affair apart from other abduction stories is the...
Published on 28 Nov. 2002 by Daniel Jolley


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but problematic, 28 Nov. 2002
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Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Andreasson Affair Phase Two: The Continuing Investigation of a Woman's Abduction by Extraterrestrials (Paperback)
This second book about the abduction experiences of Betty Andreasson Luca and her husband Bob Luca proves much more fascinating than the initial book. In a sense, this book is a prequel to its predecessor because it deals with alleged abductions experienced during Betty's childhood. What continues to set the Andreasson Affair apart from other abduction stories is the pervasive religious connotation placed by Betty on her experiences. Her story remains rather unique in this respect in the abduction literature in general. It is perhaps for this reason that her story is rarely mentioned by other researchers. One cannot say whether the events Betty recalls actually happened, although the bulk of evidence indicates that something indeed happened, and it remains virtually impossible to determine if her own feelings that the UFO occupants are angelic emissaries from God are correct or whether her own fundamentalist faith has worked its way into her mental processes as a way of making the unbelievable more acceptable and easier for her to deal with.
I am rather ambivalent when it comes to Andreasson's experiences, largely because this book betrays to me several weaknesses in the case. For example, the author only personally attended one hypnotic regression session described here, relying mainly on tapes and videos along with the information provided by his associate investigator. Distance accounts for his inability to attend the sessions, but it presents a problem to me. Most importantly, the hypnotist, while a learned behavioral psychologist, had no experience with the hypnosis of alien abductees; many times, I felt he did ask leading questions and sometimes raced ahead of his subject, leaving his own trail of information for her to follow. The absence of Fowler at the sessions left the hypnotist out on his own too often, and this accounted for most of the problems I have with the regression sessions.
Fowler also seems to be of two minds when making his points. He stresses the unique importance of this case of high strangeness, but he often rushes through other UFO materials to find anything at all that sounds similar to something Betty reported. He does attempt to place the Andreasson Affair in the context of abduction literature in general toward the end of the book, but he seems to go off on tangents that have little to do with the case at hand. He also cites sources that are questionable at best (such as an article from the Weekly World News tabloid). This does not mean the story is not true, of course. If Andreasson's revelations are accurate, this is an extraordinarily important case. For now, all of this information is greatly intriguing and invokes more questions than it answers, but there is just not enough evidence for the reader to come to a definite conclusion as to the truth of this matter.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Backwards and forwards in time, the Andreasson Investigation deepens, 7 Nov. 2010
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The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Andreasson Affair Phase Two: The Continuing Investigation of a Woman's Abduction by Extraterrestrials (Paperback)
Ray Fowler's second book in the series analyzing the long and complex case of Betty Andreasson-Luca and her family was originally published in 1982, the same year as Budd Hopkins' "Missing Time" but five years before Hopkins' landmark book "Intruders" with which it shares some common themes and methodology.

In many ways this second book about the Andreasson case is more interesting than the first published in 1979, with its focus on one single extended abduction event from 1967. Here in AA2 Fowler and the MUFON team, including psychologist/hypnotherapist Fred Max, explore the lifelong abduction experiences of both Betty and her second husband Bob and open out the discussion to what this phenomenon might be. Betty's determination to understand her experiences through the prism of her own Christian-religious faith sets this case apart from many others and makes it problematic for some researchers; but Fowler, a Christian convert himself, nevertheless remains open-minded and keeps admirably to the scientific method despite the high strangeness of the data.

The detailed recall Betty has of her abductions under professional hypnosis continues to mark this case out as significant. She always was an excellent hypnotic subject. A few outlandish and frankly horrific details (such as the abductors removing her eyeball to insert implants into her brain, then re-seating the eyeball again into its socket) had never been reported to researchers prior to this case, but later came up again and again in other cases. Betty's detailed artistic drawings of her abduction adventures are another aspect of this case which marks it out as unusual and interesting.

In the final chapters, Fowler tackles some of the more puzzling and enigmatic day-to-day phenomena experienced by the Lucas and frequently attendant to other abductees. Chapter 12, "The Psychic Element in UFO Reports", could stand on its own as a most fascinating essay: the Pentagon's expressed interest in psychic phenomena experienced by members of a military helicopter team following an encounter; poltergeist activity and temporary missing items (like keys) which inexplicably reappear in full view after hours or days are common to abductees. Fowler explores theories about these and how they fit in with CEs. Chapter 13, "Mystery Copters and the MIB" details Bob Luca's attempts to get answers from the FAA and the military about the black helicopters which frequently circled over their homes (in CT and later in MA) and followed their car. The copters were unmarked, matt black, and flying well below the 500ft minimum altitude stipulated by aviation law. Many of Bob's close-up photographs of these black helicopters are reproduced in the book, as is his extensive correspondence with various authorities about the issue. He was certainly persistent, but without result. The weirdest phenomenon of all has to be the MIB, reported consistently over years by witnesses, experiencers and investigators and also a factor in this case.

The book concludes with a couple of chapters speculating on what might be going on, taking in the viewpoints of skeptics ("it's all psychological"), proponents of the ETI hypothesis and various religious paradigms, and Betty Andreasson's own beliefs about the events. All in all, this is a fascinating and thoughtful study of an important case and contributed significantly to understanding this strange but very real phenomenon. Ray Fowler is an intelligent man, a deep thinker and a good writer, and reading his books is always time well spent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nothing as strange as reality, 20 Oct. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Andreasson Affair Phase Two: The Continuing Investigation of a Woman's Abduction by Extraterrestrials (Paperback)
Having read this fourth volume about the Andreasson Affair I can't wait to get hold of book five. The story, as previously, is so incredible, and getting more so as each book is written, that it just has to be true. It works on so many levels - you can read as a story of fiction (if you like), you can read as an extensive piece of research, you can read it as a prediction for the future - something that we will all take for granted, in years to come. It stretches the mind to incredible lengths, rating alongside the complexity of physicists trying to fathom the origins of the universe through the Big Bang theories. Its not that heavy - just enjoy
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