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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most moving account of Bomber Command Ops I have read
This account of an Australian Navigator's experiences during a tour of 30 Operations in WW2 is the most moving and descriptive account I have read. The book concentrates on the individual and the toll that the raids over Germany took both on the person and the larger RAF community. It decribes in detail through honest words the fear that the aircrew were exposed to,...
Published on 28 July 2001 by iandida@moores84.freeserve.co.uk

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Story partly told?
This is a good book but one which ultimately left me wanting a bit more. I have read a lot on this subject and Don Charlwood has a remarkable story to tell, so the potential for something new was considerable. Unfortunately, to me the story (well written though it certainly is)feels a bit skimmed over. I think it is a literary trait for people from both war years to write...
Published 20 months ago by S. Dellow


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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most moving account of Bomber Command Ops I have read, 28 July 2001
This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
This account of an Australian Navigator's experiences during a tour of 30 Operations in WW2 is the most moving and descriptive account I have read. The book concentrates on the individual and the toll that the raids over Germany took both on the person and the larger RAF community. It decribes in detail through honest words the fear that the aircrew were exposed to, night after night and the reality that the odds against their survival were against them. It does not take much imagination to place yourself in the frame of a Lancaster as it sets out across the North Sea with a crew of men all thinking similar thoughts with the full knowledge that you may not return. I would recommend this book to anybody who wants an impression of what it was really like to face a tour of Operations in Bomber Command during WW2.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly Compelling Reading, 8 Mar 2004
This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
Don Charlwood's account of life in Bomber Command Aircrews is first rate. I could not put the book down. He covers the raids and tells it like it was. He tells of a cool dedicated professionalism where unpleasant deaths happened almost every night. No-one flinched. No-one asked to drop out. They knew they stood little chance of survival. The searchlights, flak and nightfighters lay in wait over Essen, Duisburg, Berlin but still they kept flying. More good friends disappeared each time.
Despite the carnage Charlwood maintains his essential humanity and convinces of the rightness of his cause. For a reader who wants to know what it was like to take on an implacable foe in world war 2, this is the book!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don Charlwood's Moving Account, 14 April 2011
By 
father2 "father2" (England Europe) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
Regardless of the rights and wrongs of Bomber Command's strategic bombing campaign during WW2, the crews who flew the bombers were involved in a brutal conflict where their chances of survival were minimal at best.

Don Charlwood came from Australia to fight in the RAF and after being initially trained in Canada came to England to finish his navigator training and was then assigned to 103 Squadron based at RAF Elsham Wolds (part of One Group). Flying Lancasters operationally with a crew from England, Wales and Australia - they faced the daunting task of surviving thirty operations to complete their first tour.

You can read as many histories of Bomber Command as you want, but nothing helps you to understand what the actual crews went through, like this book does. Reading as one after another, Don Charlwood's friends are cruelly cut down makes sombre reading, but stands as a testimony to their bravery and commitment.

You will learn about their superstitions, their closeness as crews, dicing, squadron life, the women who loved them and waited for their return, how death could strike seemingly anywhere to anyone. You will read with tears in your eyes how close friends are killed, the crushing impact upon Don Charlwood and how in one case he helps the new wife of one dead friend.

Don Charlwood shows how crews had their focus fixed, I would say obsessively, upon completing their tours and while they did at times consider the morality of what they were doing, that aspect of the bombing campaign does not seem to be at the forefront of their minds.

Methods used by Bomber Command to keep the crews in check is subtly explored. For example the constant threat of being labelled LMF (lacking moral fibre) which caused men to push themselves sometimes beyond endurance. Also when forced to return during an operation, or unable to go on an operation - even in situations completely beyond their control - the Wing Commander made the pilot pay with accusations of "being yellow" and worse.

On one occasion the pilot of Don Charlwood's aircraft was forced back due to engine problems. Once back at their base the Engineering Officer agreed with their assessment of the situation and stated that they had no alternative to returning. But the following morning the Wing Commander was furious & reported to Group that they failed to reach their objective through "lack of determination." The recommendations for commissions for the pilot and engineer were halted - through no fault of their own and without reference to the Engineering Officer.

Don Charlwood's book is not without its humour and one account stands out when the crews were watching the on-base cinema and are told during a film about road accidents that at the present rate of road accidents one out of every ten in the audience would be killed. Given the rate that the crews were dying it is understandable why the airmen fell about the cinema laughing at this statement.

If you only ever read one book about the men who flew bombers during WW2 for the RAF's Bomber Command make it this one because it is without doubt a very fine account indeed and rightly regarded as a classic. Don Charlwood has indeed not let the others down and has told the world about their sacrifices and the bond that existed between the "Twenty Men."
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don trained at Halfpenny Green, 15 Jan 2011
By 
Susan Sant (West Midlands, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
Living 20 mins away from Halfpenny Green Airport, one day I was walking over to the control tower when I noticed a bench seat. Being nosey I took a look. On it was a nameplate dedicated to Don. He trained at Bobbington. Airport's name was changed to Halfpenny Green after WW2 pilots got confused with Bovington! Google searched about Don and ordered his book No Moon Tonight. To date have bought 5 of them for friends and family. They've all found it a fantastic read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ordinary, everyday, heroism, 14 Mar 2009
By 
Uncle Dave (Surrey, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
I stumbled across this book whilst researching my father's wartime service in the RAF Regiment. Like the author, he too was stationed at RAF Elsham Wolds in Lincolnshire, and the I read the book to try and get an idea of what it was like to be there. Well, I got that in spades, but what I also got was a magnificent story of bravery. I listened as a child to the (very) occasional reminiscences of my father's wartime experiences and stories of the planes and crews that landed there; I was in awe then and I continue to be so now - particularly after reading this book.

How guys like Don Charlwood got into those planes and flew them to Germany and back, often night after night, knowing what the odds of survival were, I cannot comprehend; but like many my age I'm thankful they did.

Interestingly for me, Don's ancestors came from a small village in Surrey called Charlwood and I live only a few miles away. He visits the village and recounts this in the book, he would probably still recognise the place today, although Gatwick has grown and swallowed up most of the surrounding countryside.

A really good book and comes thoroughly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece, 16 Mar 2004
By 
ChrisM (Shropshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
I endorse the two previous reviews in their entirety.
I also recommend a later book by Don Charlwood where he goes over much the same ground but in more detail and with illustrations. It is entitled "Journeys into Night" but although listed by Amazon appears difficult to obtain in the U.K.
Both are wonderful books to which I was introduced by an Australian friend.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fine account of an unassuming Aussie airman at war, 15 Sep 2011
By 
HuddyBolly (Larnaca, Cyprus) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
The terrible ordeal of it's 1943 - 1944 offensive over Germany has been referred to as RAF Bomber Command's Passchendael.
Indeed the blurb at the back of 'No Moon Tonight' compares the book to Sassoon's 'Memoirs of an infantry officer' and to Remarque's 'All Quiet on the Western Front'.
There the comparison ends.

For the aircrews of Bomber Command the 'Front' was the skies over Germany and the cities over which they flew.

Don Charlwood, no less than Sassoon or Remarque, entered his war sure of the righteousness of the cause for which he had volunteered.
However, earlier than did Sassoon and Remarque, he soon began to question the methods that he and his compatriots were required to use in the hopeful expectation of victory over the enemy.
Unlike Sassoon and Remarque, Charlwood's unease was based, not solely on the terrible losses suffered by combatant forces, which in his case included the deaths of virtually all of the group of young men he joined up with; but now that unease also included the toll that Bomber Command was nightly, and increasingly inflicting on the enemy civilian population.

The book takes us from Operational Training, via Wellington bombers, to Squadron operations on Lancasters at RAF Elsham Wolds

Charlwood makes no pretentions to heroism, indeed he is unusually self effacing; a
constant underlying theme being his poor opinion of himself as a navigator.
He was in every sense but one, 'the average bomber aircrewman'.
But in that one respect he was far from 'average'.
It was the all important difference between him and all those other young men he joined up with.
Ultimately, it was the only difference that mattered.

During his period of operational flying with 103 Squadron at RAF Elsham Wolds, only he and his crew survived on the squadron to complete the 30 operations required for a full tour of Operational Duty, and an end,(temporarily) to operational flying.
The others of his group would become a part of the 55,000 aircrew who died on operations in RAF Bomber Command.

The book paints a 'broad brush' picture, rich on atmosphere but lacking in detail.
In a 1984 preface to this edition the author explains that when writing the book he felt the urge to make large cuts to 'prevent the exposure of so much that I had previously concealed', but states that he resisted the temptation (to cut).

What does this mean? He does not elaborate.

Perhaps, it refers to his expressed sympathy for the civilian victims of Germany's wasted cities.

One suspects though, that when he published his book in 1956, despite that sympathy for Germany's civilian victims, he did not wish to be associated with the Government inspired post war backlash against RAF Bomber Command that had been so cynically orchestrated to deprive Bomber Command and it's brave airmen from any recognition whatever, due them for the truly appalling sacrifices their Government had required them to make, as a vitally important element of the final victory over Nazi Germany.

Whatever his motive, one is left with the feeling that there was much more to Don Charlwood's war than is told here
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic, 12 Jun 2011
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This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
A true and moving account of a tour of operations with Bomber Command. It's written in the literary style of someone skilled in the craft of communicating on a deeper level to your usual first-hand account. In saying that, there's not a hint of pretentiousness about it. What it paints is an honest and compelling picture of life in Bomber Command from the viewpoint of a sergeant-navigator. The author never flinches from laying bear his own short-comings and his frequent episodes of crisis of conscious. He vividly describes raids over Germany and finds time to examine the relationships between crew-mates and the sorrow of the passing of friends.
All in all, it's a book I'm very pleased to have discovered, although a little late.. (Written in 1956)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding first hand account of the Bomber War, 2 Feb 2012
This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
This book is, quite simply, the most outstanding personal account of what it was like to fly as a member of a bomber crew at the height of the bomber campaign, that I have ever read. If you read only one book about the bomber war you should choose this one. The only other book that even comes close to describing the life of a bomber crewman as well as this one, is Lancaster Target by Jack Currie. No Moon Tonight thoroughly deserves its description as a bomber command classic!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A superb Read, 19 Dec 2010
This review is from: No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) (Paperback)
No Moon Tonight is a superb read.I have read this book several times
over a period of years and never once got bored with the read.You begin
to feel that you know the characters personaly and follow their careers
with great interest.Don Charlwood,s forebears came from Charlwood
near Gatwick which in itself adds greater interest to his account
of his experiences during his time with the RAF.I would recommend his book to anyone interested in true accounts of wartime experiences.

nb. I have not as yet read the other two books purched at the same time.
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No Moon Tonight (Witness to War)
No Moon Tonight (Witness to War) by Don Charlwood (Paperback - Aug 2000)
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