Customer Reviews


7 Reviews


3 star
0

2 star
0

1 star
0

 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AN INFORMATIVE AND POIGNANT READ, 10 Sept. 2003
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Moksha: Aldous Huxley's Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (Paperback)
This volume brings together selections from Huxley’s Brave New World, Doors Of Perception, Heaven And Hell and Island, as well as magazine articles, letters, lectures and scientific papers. It also includes writings by Timothy Leary, Laura Huxley and Dr. Humphry Osmond. Leary’s interesting account of a 1960 meeting with Huxley at Cambridge is titled Mushrooms For Lunch, whilst the same year’s Harvard Sessions is a report of a psylocybin session where Huxley took part in a group experiment. Other very thought provoking chapters include Dr. Humphry Osmond’s May Morning In Hollywood and Huxley’s own Disregarded In The Darkness, Doors, Mescalin, Heaven And Hell and Brave New World Revisited. But the highlights of the book are Laura Huxley’s 1962 account of her husband in a psychedelic state and especially her moving account of his illness and death, titled Nobly Born. The appendix is titled Instruments For Use During A Psychedelic Experience and the book concludes with an index. This is a brilliant collection of this refined author’s best work and an insightful investigation into the use of entheogenic substances for the expansion of consciousness. I also recommend Huston Smith’s Cleansing The Doors Of Perception: The Religious Significance of Entheogentic Plants and Chemicals, William James’ Varieties Of Religious Experience the title Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness by Ralph Abraham, Terence McKenna and Rupert Sheldrake.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life and work of a great man, 28 July 2004
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
Moksha includes selections from Huxley's Brave New World, Doors Of Perception, Heaven And Hell and Island, plus a variety of magazine articles, letters, lectures and scientific papers. It also includes writings by Timothy Leary, Laura Huxley and Dr. Humphry Osmond. Leary's interesting account of a 1960 meeting with Huxley at Cambridge is titled Mushrooms For Lunch, whilst the same year's Harvard Sessions is a report of a psylocybin session where Huxley took part in a group experiment.
Other very thought provoking chapters include Dr. Humphry Osmond's May Morning In Hollywood and Huxley's own Disregarded In The Darkness, Doors, Mescalin, Heaven And Hell and Brave New World Revisited. But the highlights of the book are Laura Huxley's 1962 account of her husband in a psychedelic state and especially the essay Nobly Born, her moving account of his illness and death.
The appendix is titled Instruments For Use During A Psychedelic Experience and the book concludes with an index. This is a brilliant collection of this refined author's best work and an insightful investigation into the use of entheogenic substances for the expansion of consciousness.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Poignant read, 5 Feb. 2007
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This volume brings together selections from Huxley's Brave New World, Doors Of Perception, Heaven And Hell and Island, as well as magazine articles, letters, lectures and scientific papers. It also includes writings by Timothy Leary, Laura Huxley and Dr. Humphry Osmond. Leary's interesting account of a 1960 meeting with Huxley at Cambridge is titled Mushrooms For Lunch, whilst the same year's Harvard Sessions is a report of a psylocybin session where Huxley took part in a group experiment.

Other very thought provoking chapters include Dr. Humphry Osmond's May Morning In Hollywood and Huxley's own Disregarded In The Darkness, Doors, Mescalin, Heaven And Hell and Brave New World Revisited. But the highlights of the book are Laura Huxley's 1962 account of her husband in a psychedelic state and especially her moving account of his illness and death, titled Nobly Born. The appendix is titled Instruments For Use During A Psychedelic Experience and the book concludes with an index.

This is a brilliant collection of this refined author's best work and an insightful investigation into the use of entheogenic substances for the expansion of consciousness. I also recommend Huston Smith's Cleansing The Doors Of Perception: The Religious Significance of Entheogentic Plants and Chemicals, William James' Varieties Of Religious Experience the title Chaos, Creativity and Cosmic Consciousness by Ralph Abraham, Terence McKenna and Rupert Sheldrake.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cleansing the Doors, 10 Jun. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moksha: Aldous Huxley's Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (Paperback)
An absolutely excellent book. Don't buy it if what you are looking for are lurid tales of wild, drug-induced riotous living. This is a sober account of Huxley's experiments with mescalin, LSD and psylocybin, and, much more, reflections on the spiritual and philosophical insights gained. The letters to scientists and academics add context and the book is exceptionally clearly written, as would be expected from Huxley.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars And the truth will set you free!, 19 Jun. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moksha: Aldous Huxley's Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (Paperback)
This book cuts the propaganda and delivers the honest to god truth about god manifesting chemistry.

I hear the authorities are still in league with the priests to suppress this biography of the chemical of the gods and all political parties, on our little island, are still at it, like a troop of clapping penguins, carrying on the masquerade, and so it is our duty to give a copy, or to just speak the truth, to our friends and family. Those who think it is all an escape from reality are missing the point. Lsd opens the gates to another place, a place we can never put into words, but it is still there, all of the time; like an eternal mozart symphony, in the atmosphere, that our senses are all deaf to, until we take Lsd.

Trying to pin down weird experiences with words is like trying to eat fire with an axe. Weird experiences you see can never be embodied or wrapped up into digestible words. Zen Buddhists talk about the impossibility of describing liberation. The original doctrines of awakening came from Vedic India. When done correctly, these doctrines will break open your hopelessly dreary reality and set you on your way to Nirvana, Moksha, and God (take your pick) . Unfortunately, only the special adepts achieve this goal; in original Buddhism for example, Nirvana was not meant for the peasants. (Forget all that New Age Mad'ayana 'everybody for the ride' rubbish peddled in the west). Thank heavens then for psychedelics. Today we have the new-kids on the block; the psychedelic experience and, more excitingly, the Lsd experience. These molecules can open the gates to worldwide Enlightenment, that is, they are for the masses. Lsd is an especially fast track to the above. It is even more unfortunate then that the Lsd experience really is impossible to describe with a voice box and a pen. It's this impossibility of 'solid' evidence that leads those who refuse to step off the merry-go-round of consumerism to conclude that these things are mere hallucinations. It is all an illusion apparently.

Galileo experienced the same frustrations with his peers a few centuries ago when his fellow professors refused to take a look through his telescope. So it behooves us to remember that it wasn't the peasants who refused to look through Galileo's telescope but the scholars with their learning from Aristotle and the Bible. That was 400 years ago but this conservative archetype resonates today. Today it is the psychologists and philosophers, with their learning from Darwinism and Einstein, who refuse to take a glance at psychedelic drugs (they argue that it is all an illusion), whilst outside the academy, the peasants if you will, are partying hard!

So those today, who are claiming it is all an illusion, have to remember that the same thing was said about Galileo's discoveries. Casare Cremonini, the most renowned Aristotelian philosopher of the early seventeenth century, is remembered today as the professor who refused to look through Galileo's telescope (for this Galileo called him 'simplicio'). It was in 1610 when Galileo looked through his telescope and saw the moons of Jupiter. He then realized then that what Aristotle said must be wrong, and the Bible too. Galileo hurried to tell his fellow peers, including his good friend Cremonini, that what they have all been doing for 2000 years was completely wrong and that he had the proof, "look through here and see the proof for yourselves", Galileo would have said. But amazingly, instead of wanting to see these new truths for themselves, Galileo's peers stubbornly refused even to look through the lens! The churchmen of Galileo's day dismissed his telescopic insights as being an optical illusion or hallucination and so not worth further investigation. These medieval professors didn't have to look through Galileo's telescope because they knew what they saw with their own naked eyes (they just knew they 'knew' from 'pure reasoning' in those days!). For thousands of years the naked eye was the only tool available for science and it worked just fine; from advanced mathematics in Greece and India to gothic architecture and beautiful art, this progress was all done with the naked eye. We naturally induce that `this is all there is', but paradoxically, without evidence. This has become known as the paradox of inductive reasoning. It is not logical to infer from an observation, even if that same event happens a thousand times; but the old dogma just kept sticking around. So if Galileo saw the heavens in conflict with the prevailing Aristotelian dogma, then what he saw must be a hallucination. Because astronomers could already see, they concluded that a greater seeing was not possible and so a telescope was impossible! (Gremonini was well rewarded for his junk philosophy by the way. Just like today's academics). Today it is the professors of psychology and philosophy dons who refuse to look into psychedelic drugs. Humanity has made great progress with the naked (unperturbed) mind they say; indeed, we have built brain splittingly complicated intellectual atom smashers with just our normal conscious awareness and so conclude that this is it and that nothing lurks beyond the normal local mind space.

Well today telescopes (and microscopes) are legal and thus we have made progress in the material places. It's a crying shame then that the perturbing of mind is frowned upon by otherwise very intelligent people who really should know better. (Even some reviews of this book dismiss it as some sort of druggy fuelled stoner hippy fest! This is a stupid point to take, but as the saying goes, "against stupidity the Gods themselves contend in vain": Schiller). Today it is worldwide illegal to study these spiritual molecules or even to disprove this spiritual springboard hypothesis. Instead we only allow science which completely gives up the ghost in favour of advanced technology, but, in so doing, reduces all matter to flying atoms screaming through empty space, blind and indifferent to our whims. Nobel laureate physicist Steven Weinberg captured this weltanschauung beautifully when he said: "All the explanatory arrows point downward, from societies to people, to organs, to cells, to biochemistry, to chemistry, and ultimately to physics." He thus concluded, "the more we know of the cosmos, the more meaningless it appears". Thus science is meaningless for salvation. Are we not taught this version of reality in school?

Our loving British institutions are carved out of idiotic metaphysical millstones, grinding away at our spirits and, according to this world view, printing stamps of stupidity onto the minds of men; alas, this is a very hard stamp to shake off. This stupidity has forced psychedelics underground with the other good things of life! LSD is seen as evil because it does not fit the prevailing orthodoxy of our times, and even more so, Terence McKenna argued that it threatens our moral bourgeois institutions and the entire capitalist ethic of fearing your neighbour as you fear yourself. This stamp of fear runs deep in our nature. We naturally fear weirdness and clench our fist in moral rage at anything deemed divergent. This fear archetype is imprinted deep in our collective history. For example, in ancient Rome, charitable Christians had to contend with furious emperors and a blood thirsty coliseum. During the middle ages, hurried and harassed families had to dodge an oligarchic priesthood and a stern Church dogma; and today's free spirits must look over their shoulder, in fear of a furious busy-body class, cultural cardinals (politicians, media editors), and an overly enthusiastic police force. The stamp of human nature runs deep indeed.

I am glad that this book sets the record straight!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting writings by & about Huxley, 22 Feb. 2009
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This volume brings together selections from Huxley's Brave New World, Doors Of Perception, Heaven And Hell and Island, as well as magazine articles, letters, lectures and scientific papers. It includes writings by Timothy Leary, Laura Huxley and Dr. Humphry Osmond. Leary's interesting account of a 1960 meeting with Huxley at Cambridge is titled Mushrooms for Lunch, whilst the same year's Harvard Sessions is a report on a psylocybin session where Huxley took part in a group experiment.

Other thought-provoking chapters include Dr. Humphry Osmond's May Morning in Hollywood and Huxley's own Disregarded in the Darkness, Doors, Mescalin, Heaven And Hell and Brave New World Revisited. But the highlights of the book are Laura Huxley's 1962 account of her husband in a psychedelic state and Nobly Born, her moving account of Huxley's illness and death. The appendix is titled Instruments for use During A Psychedelic Experience; the book concludes with an index.

This is a brilliant collection of this refined author's best work and an insightful investigation into the use of entheogenic substances for the expansion of consciousness. Informative books on related aspects of this field of research include Supernatural: Meetings with the Ancient Teachers of Mankind by Graham Hancock, Plants of the Gods by Richard Schultes & DMT: The Spirit Molecule: A Doctor's Revolutionary Research into the Biology of Near-Death and Mystical Experiences by Rick Strassman. I also recommend Huston Smith's Cleansing the Doors of Perception: The Religious Significance of Entheogenic Plants and Chemicals.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book of one of Englands most thoughtful gentlemen., 11 Dec. 2000
This review is from: Moksha: Aldous Huxley's Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (Paperback)
Aldous Huxley suffered poor vision and his dream of becoming a sciencetist, Doctor was shatered. So he became a Poet and Author. He was always interested in Medicine and belived that Psychadelics were the way forward. This book is a monument to his lifes work, and shows his thoughts and also some of his creative genius. If you have had problems with drugs you will find this worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Moksha: Aldous Huxley's Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience
£12.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews