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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stirring and self-developing book
I read and read this book as an IT professional and really learnt about most of the problems I've been encountering. I hence moved from complaint to contributive proposition and got self-confident in any further action taken since. Moreover, most of the examples produced are common to major enterprises. I am convinced things could be better in some enterprises, had the...
Published on 17 Nov 1999 by ben-zwi.onu@st.com

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5 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I wonder how Dilbert would lead
There was strange assumption that organizations greatest problem is inefficiency that is caused by lack of co-operation and bad communication. Other problems such as management which living in different reality or work over loading of every person in organization. What if management decides to cut of bonuses and outsource to India? Thous currently very common situations...
Published on 24 May 2008 by Kerola Sami


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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stirring and self-developing book, 17 Nov 1999
By 
ben-zwi.onu@st.com (Saint-Genis, France) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
I read and read this book as an IT professional and really learnt about most of the problems I've been encountering. I hence moved from complaint to contributive proposition and got self-confident in any further action taken since. Moreover, most of the examples produced are common to major enterprises. I am convinced things could be better in some enterprises, had the management read this sort of best-practice-minded book. I have started disseminating the book around me and hope it'll help go ahead solving problems and sharing knowledge. It's clear problems mostly arise due to a lack of managerial culture.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensable, 20 Jan 2002
This review is from: Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge (Paperback)
Packed with useful advice, techniques and plans for collaborative working and altering the way your colleagues and organisation works. Useful section on analytical thinking: how to make those unstructured, going nowhere meetings more productive. They're also willing to say when trying to change your colleagues' attitudes you won't get it right or be successful all the time, but they make a great case for sticking at it. Very useful, I'll be referring to this for some time to come.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking how-to for implementing change, 9 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
This book is great! I have bought copies for several of my friends who are in dysfunctional companies. The chapter on "Purpose" is worth the price alone. You need to know your own purpose before you can come to understand the purpose of your organization. The authors provide excellent guidance in how to broach issues within an organization, how to nuture ideas without getting them squashed. How to move ideas and projects along in a team environment. I recommend this book to anyone who is trying to implement change and stay sane while doing it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clear, Simple Way to Learn Lateral Leadership, 21 April 2009
By 
A. O. P. Akemu "Ona" (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge (Paperback)
Have you ever been in a position where you did not have formal authority to change the behaviour of fellow team members only to discover, to your chagrin that telling them what to do is futile? Have you ever suspected - even slightly - that you may have contributed your fair share to the poor collaboration within your team? If so, then this book, "Getting it Done", is for you. Messrs Fisher and Sharp present a few simple techniques to help people like me, who answered in the affirmative to both questions above, influence the behaviour of my peers. They call these techniques, lateral leadership. These techniques are summarised below:

PURPOSE. Formulate the purpose of the team in terms of results to be achieved. In order to ensure that the rest of the team buys into the purpose, then it is essential that the team is involved in formulating the purpose. Furthermore, set purposes that will be attained in the short, medium and long term. It is essential to ensure a balance among the three time frames.

THINKING. The authors note with some wit that we, as individuals, think haphazardly and this is compounded when we work in teams. Therefore, it is important when collectively solving problems to think systematically from the data (the evidence for the problem) through diagnosis (possible causes of then problem) and direction (strategy to resolve problem) to what to do next (immediate tactics to realise the strategy).

LEARNING. This was the most useful insight that I gleaned from the book. The authors suggest that one learns from experience and review practice as often as possible in the team. This thinking may sound trite but it exposed my predisposition to separate planning the work from doing actually doing the work.

ENGAGEMENT. Our job descriptions almost never description all that we can do at work to improve collaboration. Even though one may have a `technical' job description one can still offer to engage with colleagues to improve collaboration.

FEEDBACK. Authors describe three uses of feedback: for evaluation, appreciation or change of behaviour.

The authors' style is easy to follow, punchy, matter-of-fact but somewhat tentative. They portray the book as `work in progress' and even go to some length to state that it (the book) may not be for everyone in the corporate hierarchy. The authors draw on their vast experience in teaching negotiation courses at Harvard. One potential drawback to the book's matter-of-fact style is that engaging case studies are thin on the ground. I thought that the paucity of human stories in the book deprived it of some intellectual bite.

Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed reading Getting it Done. I see this book as a reference that will help me develop some of the behaviours that I want to see replicated in my immediate team at work. For ease of reading, clarity of delivery and aptness to my work situation, Getting it Done deserves my 4 stars.
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42 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid Advice for the Most Common Business Problem, 27 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
Whenever I meet with bright, motivated business people who want to improve the world, they always complain about others in their organizations who will not cooperate in a change process. Get those reluctant people on board the progress train, and the more positive future will soon arrive. Almost never do these complainers realize that their own habits, perspective, and behavior are contributing to delaying the progress by making others oppose the initiative.
Getting It Done is a wonderful book for helping each of us see ourselves as part of the problem and part of the solution in situations when many people must cooperate. That's a first in my experience.
The book builds on that valuable perspective by suggesting what skills we each need to improve, and how we can implement a process that will lead to genuine, effective progress. That is very critical, because most improvements occur because someone has designed an effective process to ease their implementation. In new areas, by definition, there is seldom such a process. My suggestion is that you try this one if you have no other.
I also liked the way the authors went on to generalize about how lateral leadership (influencing peers) provides lessons for when you are the boss. The same lessons apply here as well. Influencing people through genuine involvement leads to both better solutions and to better implementation.
If you only read and learn to apply one book this year, Getting It Done should be that book. My reasoning is simple. If you cannot help those you work with to make successful collaborations, you and everyone around you will always operate at a low level of effectiveness. Also, your work day will be filled with stress, conflict, pressure, too much to do, and worry. That's not the way you want to live. Getting It Done can help you develop the skills to get the benefits of how all of us know and can do more than any one of us. When you are able to get that benefit from being in an enterprise, life becomes very interesting, rewarding, and meaningful. You will also feel good about living closer to your potential as a person.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars REALLY helpful for getting a team to work together, 3 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
Well organized, easy to read. This little handbook offers lots of ideas for how to influence (for the better) the way your team works together. How to get past the pointless meetings and reactive in-fighting among group members -- how to set goals and keep the group on track in acheiving them. The chapter on giving and receiving good feedback (separating appreciation, coaching & evaluation) was especially helpful. And all this oriented toward when you're not even the one in charge.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Some very useful tips for working better with others, 28 May 2008
By 
Adil Hussain "adilson05uk" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge (Paperback)
There is no doubting that working in a team we get more done than working alone. This book is packed with tips on how we can work/collaborate better with others. The advice is based on a method of "lateral leadership", which consists of three steps: "The first step is to organise and sharpen your personal skills at getting things done by yourself. The second step is to understand clearly your strategic goal of an organised way of getting things done with others. The third step is learning some tactics of participatory leadership." The first two steps I kind of skim-read. Techniques pertaining to the third step I found particularly thought-provoking and useful; techniques related to asking, offering and doing things that "stimulate others to become skillful at working together".

In summary: another good book from the Harvard Negotiation team; well-structured and plenty of examples to demonstrate the advice.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking how-to for implementing change, 9 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
This book is great! I have bought copies for several of my friends who are in dysfunctional companies. The chapter on "Purpose" is worth the price alone. You need to know your own purpose before you can come to understand the purpose of your organization. The authors provide excellent guidance in how to broach issues within an organization, how to nuture ideas without getting them squashed. How to move ideas and projects along in a team environment. I recommend this book to anyone who is trying to implement change and stay sane while doing it.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars filled with powerful tools and ideas, 11 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
Fisher, Sharp and Richardson have an astonishing ability to design simple but powerful tools for clear thinking and focused action.
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7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed it, 22 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting it Done (Hardcover)
The book is good and it improved my knowledge. I felt a little was lacking in the implementation aspects of leadership skills. I also read a book that would fill this gap and I recommend it....."The Leader's Guide: 15 Essential Skills."
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Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge
Getting It Done: How to Lead When You're Not in Charge by Alan Sharp (Paperback - 1 Mar 2010)
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