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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great sequel, great stories, great research!
I was really glad when this second book came out because it had complete stories written by some of the people themselves. There's a whole lot of different approaches to healing by the different authors that are very useful for understanding different ways to heal karma.
It also has a REALLY GREAT chapter about "Edgar Cayce on the Holocaust" written by...
Published on 3 Aug 1999

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting but somewhat disappointing sequel: lacks research
After having read Rabbi Gershom's "Beyond the Ashes", I looked forward to this book as perhaps providing the missing dimension of the previous book, namely the real life histories of those people who (apparently) suffered in the Holocaust and then reincarnated and accessed past memories. On the whole I was disappointed: this book contains 15 personal stories from 15...
Published on 21 May 2008 by Pablo


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great sequel, great stories, great research!, 3 Aug 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: From Ashes to Healing (Paperback)
I was really glad when this second book came out because it had complete stories written by some of the people themselves. There's a whole lot of different approaches to healing by the different authors that are very useful for understanding different ways to heal karma.
It also has a REALLY GREAT chapter about "Edgar Cayce on the Holocaust" written by Rabbi Gershom that tells how some of the things that Cayce supposedly said about Jews in the Holocaust were never said by him at all. Such as the Holocaust being a karmic punishment, etc. which Cayce NEVER said! It turns out that the source of these teachings was an American Nazi sympathizer who went to Cayce for a reading in the 1930's and misunderstood it, etc. Everybody who is into Cayce or New Age philosophy really needs to read this chapter -- as well as the rest of the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting but somewhat disappointing sequel: lacks research, 21 May 2008
By 
Pablo (Co. Down/ Navarra) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: From Ashes to Healing (Paperback)
After having read Rabbi Gershom's "Beyond the Ashes", I looked forward to this book as perhaps providing the missing dimension of the previous book, namely the real life histories of those people who (apparently) suffered in the Holocaust and then reincarnated and accessed past memories. On the whole I was disappointed: this book contains 15 personal stories from 15 different contributors which range from the possibly convincing to the quite definitely unconvincing and from the fascinating to the banal.
At the more convincing end of the spectrum, we have the famous story of the clock, where, through recurrent spontaneous dreams (supplemented later by hypnotic regression) the (Canadian) writer apparently accesses a past life as a Dutch Jew where an antique clock has a significant place in the hideout where he and his family sheltered from the Nazis. After the third dream he receives directions to a Canadian antique shop where the very same clock is for sale, the shopkeeper having picked it up from Holland where the authorities had sold off unclaimed items from World War II Dutch Jews.
At the other end of the spectrum we have a writer who describes himself as a "religious mystic" who suffered from a traumatic childhood, a serious weight problem, depression and low self-esteem. On reading Rabbi Gershom's "Beyond the Ashes" this writer started to believe that he "might have been a victim of the Nazi Holocaust in a past life" which he begins to explore by what he describes as "self-hypnosis". The following excerpt from his story reminds me a little bit of Gogol's "The Diary of a Madman" when the diary-writer wakes up one morning with the "realisation" that the missing King of Spain is in fact himself. It's really quite sad: "When I thought about my past life in the Holocaust, I somehow sensed that I had been an adolescent Jewish girl, between the ages of twelve and fifteen. Over the years, I have had many dreams in which I was a young girl". However much the reader may suspend judgment on some of the stories, it is quite clear that this poor man needs a different kind of assistance than that provided by the good rabbi. Its inclusion in the book casts serious doubt on the author's objectivity.
Then again we have the fascinating story of the contributor who has both "past life memories" of dying in a concentration camp and the undeniable talent of creating (acclaimed) sculptures of the Holocaust. In short, this book is something of a mixed bag. A significant number of the contributors are Gentiles with dysfunctional childhoods who "feel Jewish", and a number of non-mystical interpretations could explain many of the stories. In fairness to the book, many of the stories are very interesting, but I feel that Rabbi Gershom's comment that this "is not a book of dry systematic case histories" is something of a defensive cop-out and his claim that these are "in-depth personal stories" is somewhat deceptive: The 15 stories cover no more than 136 pages and a bit of systematic research and the inclusion of the details thereof would have enhanced the book no end (although one or two stories might have bit the dust in the process).
Rabbi Gershom has since branched out into studying how Jews are portayed in "Star Trek". One wonders why.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Astonishing testimonies, 18 July 2010
By 
Kjeld Hesselmann (Nykoebing, Denmark) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: From Ashes to Healing (Paperback)
The sequel is just as compelling as "Beyond the Ashes". In this follow up book Gershom let the storytellers come forward in their own words (lightly edited). The fifteen stories presented differ of course in personal details, but the overall impression is that now they have told their grim story, some burden have been removed, and each individual can move on in their life more light-footed.
I'm personally convinced myself, that reincarnation do exists. But the stories can also be read as testemony of the human psyche's eminent ability to draw significance out of obscure material. So as a sceptic one has not to feel out of place, but can as well as true believers enjoy the moveable personal stories.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bravo! More real-life reincarnation stories!, 18 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: From Ashes to Healing (Paperback)
Thank you, Rabbi Gershom, for more wonderful reincarnation stories. "Beyond the Ashes" was beautiful, and you continue to elate and inspire us with "From Ashes to Healing". More! More!
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From Ashes to Healing by Yonassan Gershom (Paperback - 31 Mar 1997)
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